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Posted: 12/18/2005 1:37:29 PM EDT
I have developed my own steel targets. I would buy them but all my money goes for ammo and new guns. I live near a set of railroad tracks.If you walk along a set of tracks for a few hundred yards you will find the metal plates that the rails are spiked to laying on the side of the railbed. These make excellent targets and are very durable. The first time I used one I built a frame out of one inch black pipe and hung the target with the heaviest chain I could buy at lowes. It did alright but after about 700 rounds or so the chain was shot to pieces and the frame was falling apart as well. The steel was also so dented that some of the SKS rounds and 308's from my friends g-3 were going through. The next time I tried this I built a large wooden frame from 2x4's and suspended 2 of the plates from it. I also used white primer and then blaze orange paint on the metal. I used heavy nylon clothes line to hang them with. This worked great. The nylon got shot through a few times but for the most part would take several hits before it broke. The wood frames were also pretty damn durable and held up to a full days shooting.They are actually still sitting at my friends range.I've seen a few other posts about the railroad plates so I know it's not a new idea but thought it was worth mentioning. I put them out at about 80 yards and have never had a problem. I was very proud my last time out because I managed to hit 3 of 7 from my colt officers model at that range. The plates are about 6 inches by 15 inches(best guest) and about 3/4 to 1 inch thick.Hope this helps somebody
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:06:44 PM EDT
looked like good steel up here too. Except someone stole 3 tons of it from a nearby town! I don't need targets that bad.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:07:53 PM EDT
Don't railroad plates belong to the railroad?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:20:37 PM EDT
I shot a one of those with my M4 once, after just a few strikes it shattered into pieces. Maybe I had a bad one.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:35:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By txgp17:
I shot a one of those with my M4 once, after just a few strikes it shattered into pieces. Maybe I had a bad one.



I've experienced the same thing----I think they are iron castings that are relatively brittle.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:55:10 PM EDT
The ones on the railbed are old ones that are just tossed to the side. When they replace ties and track they use all new materials. I know because my dad worked for the railroad for 40 years. All you have to do is walk the tracks a little and they are just lying around.I've never seen one just shatter or break apart and I've put the ones I've used through some serious shooting. They were always suspended so they would swing but I used quite a bit of ss109 from sellior and belliot on them with no problem. They may be made out of different qualities of steel depending on who made them. Im pretty sure they are steel and not iron. The 308's made a hell of a dent and bulged the back a little but no breakage and they are thick enough tht they dont warp. They are also heavy at propably 20 pound a piece.Has anyone else had them shatter when shot? I've not heard that before.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:53:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/18/2005 3:53:34 PM EDT by gmtmaster]
I have an entry and exit scar on my right leg from shooting railroad plates. The crater and are dangerous..I will never shoot them again..
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 5:59:34 PM EDT
As I recall there was a post a while back on return fire from railroad iron: was that you gmtmaster?
Link Posted: 12/19/2005 6:14:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By weilmd:
As I recall there was a post a while back on return fire from railroad iron: was that you gmtmaster?



Yes.

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