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Posted: 11/20/2003 3:29:40 PM EDT
I searched the forums, and took alot of advice from previous posts, such as printing out the rules regarding declaring rifles and such. However, I am left with a few questions...

1.) How do I approach the check-in counter about "declaring" my rifle. More specifically what to say ???

2.) Ive got it it dissassembled, and in a gun case which i have fitted with two padlocks, are they going to consider the fact that I placed the locking mechanism as a no-no?

3.) Ive also considered asking a police man to escort me to the check in counter, so that I have no problems with the people panicking or anything... Yea or Nay???

Im really looking forward to this trip, as I am taking my father shooting for the first time in like 30 years, and I dont want to screw up anything I could have avoided from the get-go, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 3:47:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/20/2003 3:47:49 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 3:50:12 PM EDT
Thanks. Would it be better to have it assembled?
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 4:01:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 4:11:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/20/2003 4:20:10 PM EDT by Leisure_Shoot]
When are you travelling? If you have time, it has been suggested to ship it to a FFL at your destination. This will allow you to not worry about theft, as you can insure it. And you don't have to worry about being hassled. If you fly, I have heard it suggested that you contact the airline and request directions in writing, that you can take with you, so that when they tell you that you can't lock it, you can show them that you can. Or when they put a large sticker on it that says RIFLE, you can say that is wrong and back it up.
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 4:30:43 PM EDT
actually, I am leaving at 9 in the morning... I probably should be able to find the rules regarding the issue of locking it, and the sticker issue online I assume? I probably should have shipped it, but it got to close to the wire.
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 5:07:39 PM EDT
I've only flown Delta and United with a weapon (an AR) to check in, and only once each airline, but I had it locked in an aluminum case, and had no problems. Brian
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 5:16:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 6:06:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/20/2003 6:10:38 PM EDT by vatolocal]
Here is what you do. Have your AR in a hard gun case. It can be assembled if you want. It is your choice. Remember that tens of thousands of passengers check in rifles and handguns every year. You don't need a police escort. Don't waste the officer's time. They will know you have a rifle just by seeing your case. Keep the gun unloaded (common sense). Tell the ticket agent that you have a rifle you want to check in. Have your locks with you that way you can lock the case after they place an "unloaded firearm" paper inside. It's a real simple process. Don't sweat it. If you have ammo, it has to be in orginal packaging, and in a crush proof container(hard suit case). You can usually check in 5lbs of ammo. Like I say don't sweat it. Also to have it shipped to an FFL is absolutely silly, when you can legally have it fly in the belly of the plane with you. Have a safe trip.
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 11:26:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By vatolocal: Here is what you do. Have your AR in a hard gun case. It can be assembled if you want. It is your choice. Remember that tens of thousands of passengers check in rifles and handguns every year. You don't need a police escort. Don't waste the officer's time. They will know you have a rifle just by seeing your case. Keep the gun unloaded (common sense). Tell the ticket agent that you have a rifle you want to check in. Have your locks with you that way you can lock the case after they place an "unloaded firearm" paper inside. It's a real simple process. Don't sweat it. If you have ammo, it has to be in orginal packaging, and in a crush proof container(hard suit case). You can usually check in 5lbs of ammo. Like I say don't sweat it. Also to have it shipped to an FFL is absolutely silly, when you can legally have it fly in the belly of the plane with you. Have a safe trip.
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Basically what I did today, flying America West. I told the ticketing lady "I have firearms to check in", she just asked me if my weapons were unloaded and had me sign the statement to that effect. They did want the ammo and weapons separate, it didn't matter in what checked bag the ammo went in. Mr. Supervisor then took my case and key in the back, probably physically cleared them, locked the case then came back out front and gave me my keys. Then he and another ticketing girl gave the original girl a hard time because she put the firearm tag on the outside of my case, which they said is a NO GO. My case did come out of the baggage carousel, along with everyone else's bags. An easy, relatively painless experience. Chris
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 4:35:45 AM EDT
First let me introduce myself. Just retired from Department of Homeland Security, (TSA) after being forced there in August 2002 from the office of Civil Aviation Security for the FAA. Up till August 02, I was one of the Senior Special Agents in the regional office in Chicago IL for 12 years. Prior to that I was the lead special agent at Los Angeles. Believe me when I say that nothing has changed since September 11th. Any and all persons wishing to transport any legal firearm still must go through the same procedures as before. 1. Get to the airport earlier than you would usually have done. (I can not tell you the number of times folks have gotten into trouble because they were running late and were sent to the gate without being able to check there firearm in properly. They are stopped at the checkpoint and in every case arrested and missed their flight). SO GET THERE EARLY! 2. Go directly to the ticket counter. You can not check a firearm in at the curb. 3. Let the ticket agent know that you have an unloaded firearm in your checked bag. At this point I’d add that it is always good to contact the airline ahead of time to see what their requirements are. Remember, the federal government gives them the minimum standards they must comply with. They can and some go way beyond these standards. 4. Don’t fail the attitude test (remember the last time you were able to get out of a ticket because you were “nice”). Remember everyone has a boss. If the ticket agent turns out to be really dumb, ask for a supervisor or a G.S.C. (Ground Security Coordinator). All airlines are required to have at least one GSC per flight. These folks know the rules – they can and will help if needed. 5. Most times you will not be requested or required to open your case in public (not safe to do it anyway). If you have a problem with them opening the case without you being present (they shouldn’t anyway) ask to speak with the GSC. 6. Remember, the airline has the right to refuse passage. So get there early and be nice. This doesn’t been you have to take a lot of crap – remember you can always ask for the GSC. 7. Another tip – bring some duck tape. After the case has been cleared through security have then lock and duck tape it. Hope this helps future travelers. Please remember to keep you cool. Also by getting there earlier you might be able to change your seat to a better one (I always preferred the emergency row has it normally has more leg room).
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