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Posted: 8/8/2003 12:17:10 PM EDT
Now that I am the proud owner of an AR, and being that it's pretty pricey along with my other guns What is recommened for secure storage?
I'm looking at Gun Safes but not sure which one is better than another. Are any truly fire proof that will keep the guns from melting and the ammo from exploding?

Where does everyone store theirs?
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 12:37:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2003 12:41:58 PM EDT by Slacker]
I've got a $400 14 gun Sentry safe (not cabinet) bolted to the floor and wall. Its not firelined, but it'll slow down the crackheads. I have a large rider on my homeowners, nothing in the safe is one of a kind. Eventually I'll get a big ass Liberty, but that won't be until I buy my last house. I move around alot and the 400lb Sentry is about all I can move by myself. [img]http://personalpages.tds.net/~eflanagin/safeclosed.JPG[/img]
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 1:18:17 PM EDT
I have one of the big Libertys. Theres no place to hide that big boy. Its bolted to the floor out in the open in my bedroom.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 1:37:11 PM EDT
I took the shelves out of a closet and my 500 pound Treadlock sits in there. I've seen walk in closets converted into safe rooms with a safe door behind the closet door and a reinforced block lining.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 2:42:13 PM EDT
I also have the Liberty Safe. 72x35x30 Big Black Beauty. 12 1" locking bolts. Has all the room... 23 handguns, 6 rifles, 3 shotgun, and ammo. Also bolted down. Enough space for personal items that need to be handy.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 2:44:34 PM EDT
I have a Liberty Lincoln 35, and have it bolted down to a big concrete pad. It's nicely hidden, but I won't tell you where [:D]
Link Posted: 8/9/2003 6:09:45 PM EDT
Ammo, in the safe. [rofl] [rofl2] No way is there room in a safe for ammo.
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 1:59:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2003 2:00:32 PM EDT by coldblue]
Buy the best safe you can afford, but get one with a telephone style push button lock, not a combination one. Reason is, you can use your mom's birthday (six digits) as the push-button combo, so you never forget her birthday; and if you practice, you will be able to punch in the combo in the dark and gain access to your weapon. If you go with a combination dial, tape a small flashlight with red lens to the door so you can open it without switching-on room lights, and/or totally destroying your night vision conditioning.
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 2:43:40 PM EDT
First, no safe will protect the contents from fire indefinetly, but the better the fire rating, the longer it will last giving you the time necessary to save it from fire. Second, try to hide your safe from eyes if you can. The best safe is the one no one knows about. Thieves can't steal or break into what they don't know is there. If they can't find it, you don't even need the safe, that's only if it becomes found. I like the Liberty safes, and I bought the biggest and highest fire rating ones I could get, then bolted them down and hid them where I could. There are better safes, but it was available in my area, are good products, and I like that the hinges are internal. Thieves will try to cut the hinges, which doesn't help them since it's the door locking bolts that matter, but can save you from having to repair/replace because they cut them and couldn't get in. My next step is to build/modify a room and use security/safe doors, which will be semi-hidden even then. My first poorman "safes" where Knaack boxes - better than nothing. If you have a problem moving the safe where you want it, or need to easily move it in the future, look into the Zanotti safes, which can be broken down into 6 pieces and are made of serious materials, not lightweight cheesy sheetmetal. Third, push button (electric) locks are not always the best idea. In Alaska, where -50deg conditions can render the battery power or display in an electronic inoperative, a dial lock might be necessary. The darkness in Barrow lasts for a continous month and a half (no sunrise during that entire period) and trying to read an unlit dial is difficult, so lighting may be necessary. None of this applies to manual pushbuttons, which do not need light or power. Also, try NOT to use a common combo, like a birthday, SS#, etc, because that makes it easier for someone who can access that info to come upon the combo to get into the safe, just like a PIN number. If you must, try and convert the numbers into a letter system and use a mnemonic that is not related to anything else of yours. I mean use a system such as the letters assigned to a telephone pad, and make up a combo that will give you a word that you can easily remember (don't use your dog's name!).
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 3:55:52 PM EDT
Well, I wasn't worried about fire, I was worried about thieves while on vacation, etc. Now, being low on cash, I bought one of the inexpensive HOMAK safes with the two cylindrical locks. I took it home, put it 'back-down' on a coyuple of sawhorses, and painted it light machine gray. Then, I went to Montana Electric Supply, and got a big high voltage sticker, and a 'Square D' logo. I then fastened it to the basement wall next to the breaker box, and drilled it for a couple of conduits, and put some empty conduit into it, running into the wall. It's in plain sight, and never gets noticed. My Dad from Iowa was out a couple of years ago,(He's an Electrician) and wondered what kind of high voltage motors I was running off it, and laughed his ass off when I unlocked it.
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 6:00:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By montanaman: Well, I wasn't worried about fire, I was worried about thieves while on vacation, etc. Now, being low on cash, I bought one of the inexpensive HOMAK safes with the two cylindrical locks. I took it home, put it 'back-down' on a coyuple of sawhorses, and painted it light machine gray. Then, I went to Montana Electric Supply, and got a big high voltage sticker, and a 'Square D' logo. I then fastened it to the basement wall next to the breaker box, and drilled it for a couple of conduits, and put some empty conduit into it, running into the wall. It's in plain sight, and never gets noticed. My Dad from Iowa was out a couple of years ago,(He's an Electrician) and wondered what kind of high voltage motors I was running off it, and laughed his ass off when I unlocked it.
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[hail2] Now that has got to win a cookie! I love it!
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 6:40:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By montanaman: Well, I wasn't worried about fire, I was worried about thieves while on vacation, etc. Now, being low on cash, I bought one of the inexpensive HOMAK safes with the two cylindrical locks. I took it home, put it 'back-down' on a coyuple of sawhorses, and painted it light machine gray. Then, I went to Montana Electric Supply, and got a big high voltage sticker, and a 'Square D' logo. I then fastened it to the basement wall next to the breaker box, and drilled it for a couple of conduits, and put some empty conduit into it, running into the wall. It's in plain sight, and never gets noticed. My Dad from Iowa was out a couple of years ago,(He's an Electrician) and wondered what kind of high voltage motors I was running off it, and laughed his ass off when I unlocked it.
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[hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ha­il2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ [hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][ha­il][hail][hail][hail][hail] [hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ha­il2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ [hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][ha­il][hail][hail][hail][hail] [hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ha­il2][hail2][hail2][hail2][ [hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][hail][ha­il][hail][hail][hail][hail]
Link Posted: 8/10/2003 7:04:41 PM EDT
I don't won any guns. I just defend the right of other people to have them
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 8:59:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By montanaman: Well, I wasn't worried about fire, I was worried about thieves while on vacation, etc. Now, being low on cash, I bought one of the inexpensive HOMAK safes with the two cylindrical locks. I took it home, put it 'back-down' on a coyuple of sawhorses, and painted it light machine gray. Then, I went to Montana Electric Supply, and got a big high voltage sticker, and a 'Square D' logo. I then fastened it to the basement wall next to the breaker box, and drilled it for a couple of conduits, and put some empty conduit into it, running into the wall. It's in plain sight, and never gets noticed. My Dad from Iowa was out a couple of years ago,(He's an Electrician) and wondered what kind of high voltage motors I was running off it, and laughed his ass off when I unlocked it.
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ROTF! That was a stroke of genius. Post a pic if you have one.
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 10:35:32 AM EDT
I used to be a safe technician so I'll try to help if i can. First of all the keypad style locks are probably the best way to go. With the keypad style you can access your safe much more quickly than with the older combination style locks. They are also regarded as being more secure because there are no mechanical parts to allow for surreptitious entry. Look for safes with a UL rating. Underwriters Laboratories does very comprehensive testing. The weight shouldn't play a big factor if you aren't planning on moving any time soon, but be sure to bolt it down. Also make sure that there is at least one layer of hardplate between the door of the safe and the lock body. Maybe the most important part is that you make sure that the insulating material in your safe does not use a composite mixture with a high moisture content. (=rust)
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 10:47:06 AM EDT
I have an American Security Safe that I've had a long time so it's not really fire rated but it will hold it back for a while. I have mine in a exterior corner wall in a room that no one can see. Only family members know where it's at or even know that I have one. Being on a corner wall, if the house ever catches fire, it will ventilate a lot quicker on a corner wall than it would sitting in the middle of the house or against an interior wall. I did learn that when I was in the Fire Department. Plus, it would be alot easier to remove from the debris if that did ever happen. Let's hope that it doesn't. Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 1:42:25 PM EDT
I purchase the mother of most safes a Cannon 54. 6'X50"X28". Empty the sucker is like 1300-1400 lbs. and now its more like a ton, with the shit that is in there.
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 8:41:17 AM EDT
Not to bad mouth gun safes, but, a freind of mine lost his house when some knucklehead tried to burn his safe open with a torch. The guy that burned down my buddies house knew when he wasn't home, knew he had guns, and had plenty of time to do whatever he needed to do to get them. His neighbors didn't hear a thing untill the F.D. showed up. I made a false return air duct in my basement that I store my guns in. I have no indications whatsoever that I have a gun in the house. A good alarm system can be defeated, but, 99.9% of your B&E dorks won't even try.
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 9:58:09 AM EDT
I have a 1000 lb liberty, the safe hold the weapons, nightvision as well as hard currency. I agree with 552 Its in the bedroom and bolted to the concerte floor. I have a 45 in the frig.
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 11:11:29 AM EDT
I have been looking also for a safe. I was looking at the Browning Angled Back # SP30SOF. I will look at the Liberty Safes now that you guys talk about them. Buying the safe isn't the problem. Delivery is expensive. $200.00 to move it just into my garage. If I want it brought into the house and depends which landing I want. The cost could go another $400.00. To me that's highway robbery. If the company or shop you buy from is going to sell a safe delivery should not be that much IMHO.
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 11:18:12 AM EDT
This is something I just went out and bought last night myself... I was sitting at work thinking about the collection of firearms I have at the house..sitting in their nice, shiny, pretty aluminum cases...two shotguns, two pistols, and of course, my new Bushmaster... And I got paranoid, so I called up some friends and went to Academy for something I can use at the house...it's a rental house, and I know i'll get something bigger, better and more fireproof than this Sentry... But It'll work in the meantime...I have it in the hall closet, the closet enterance is occluded when the hallway door is open, and I have clothes in front of it... I don't think I'll need to get into it in a hurry...since I keep my 1911 and 12 guage in the bedroom for those night time visitors... Academy had them on sale..$299, 14 gun safe, not a great fire rating, spin type combo...but it'll work till I get my house built...eventually I will build my house.. And at that point...I'll have floor safes in different area's...
Link Posted: 8/12/2003 12:57:38 PM EDT
Used to store my rifles in a Sentry metal cabinet. Bolted to the closet floor, with a heavy chain and extra lock wrapped around it for extra measure. Presently I have a Remington Express metal security cabinet and a $15,000 rider on my townhouse's insurance. Bulk ammo is in the basement, up on cement blocks in case of water leakage. CKMorley
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