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Posted: 8/7/2003 2:53:13 PM EDT
I'm wondering about these.
Worth the expense?
Lock time faster?
Longer wearing?
Any advice/info appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

Semper Ti
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 2:55:04 PM EDT
I'd rather have a new steel one and 2 spares than 1 titanium. YMMV
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 3:02:53 PM EDT
Ti is pretty much a gimmick because everyone sees it as a wondermetal...it is wonderful stuff but it is really more of a structural metal than a working metal. It has very poor wear properties and is subject to work hardening and embrittlement. Apparently, under certain circumstances the presence of hydrogen molecules in the form of certain contaminants can really weaken the grain structure of Ti. Just pass and get a high quality steel one. You'll be much better off.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 4:03:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/7/2003 4:04:50 PM EDT by thedr13]
I was wondering the same thing about Ti firing pins. I own a DPMS CAR HBAR and wrote to DPMS about it and they replied, That it was too light thus doesn't have the same striking force on the primer. May cause some non-firing rounds. I agree with the previous statement about having three steel back-ups. The Sportsmans Guide has three AR firing pins for $17.95. [sniper]
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 4:24:15 PM EDT
Ti firing pins are a bad idea for a lot of reasons, in my opinion and that of many others. Numerous posts on here to that effect. If you want to research in detail, you might find a lot of info by using the search feature.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 6:31:07 PM EDT
I have a TiN coated one in my 300 whisper and it works great. Using a JT low mass hammer and trigger setup. I figure if my power tool bits come coated with the stuff, it should increase the wear life of my firing pin. On the other hand, I have heard of but not seen some locals here in SC that have had troubles with their full Titanium firing pins in 1911 and Glock pistols. Light hits on the primers and FTF on military ammo. Stronger springs were needed, which seems to cancel out the reason for the Titanium in the first place.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 7:01:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TAC40: I figure if my power tool bits come coated with the stuff, it should increase the wear life of my firing pin.
View Quote
Just a note on personal experience. I once had to drill a lot of holes through hardened steel. Using a hodge podge of standard high speed steel 1/8" drills, I was drilling on average 3 holes per drill. Then I ran out. I went to Home Depot. The Home Depot I went to had all of the drills behind a counter. So I had to ask. Long story short, since I wasn't paying for it, I decided to try the TiN. They would only make it through 1 hole. Maybe. I was letting the drill do the work, but it wasn't going. I had to push on them to get them through. I won't buy them anymore.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 8:31:55 PM EDT
Titanium has always seemed a little brittle to me for use as a firing pin. Just my opinion though.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 10:57:24 PM EDT
I put them in a couple of my ARs. No improvement in accuracy or any other advantage that I could see. One of them got really beat up and the point chipped off. I replaced it with the old steel firing pin. IMHO they are a complete waste of money. Watch-Six
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 10:58:18 PM EDT
Best way to spend you hard earn cash if you don't really care where your money goes. I rather wasted on a lap dance then buy a ti pin. [:)]
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 11:44:03 PM EDT
Titanium seems to work great in the rotor heads of the Blackhawk and Apache but their application is a bit different than ours. Just stick with the hard chrome, spend your money elsewhere; yeh like a lap dance... Best regards, J
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 6:46:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Watch-Six: I put them in a couple of my ARs. No improvement in accuracy or any other advantage that I could see. One of them got really beat up and the point chipped off. I replaced it with the old steel firing pin. IMHO they are a complete waste of money. Watch-Six
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And that's the biggest problem with them. The tips tend to wear, get a little pointy, and pretty soon you're piercing primers with them. It's a gimmick, nothing more. There's no advantage over the plain-jane steel pin.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 7:03:06 AM EDT
Titanium firing pins are supposed to reduce lock time for increased accuracy. How much of an increase is debatable. It probably wouldn't be worthwhile in an AR type rifle. Perhaps in benchrest competitions where shaving off an extra .01" could be the difference between winning and losing. The other thing with titanium firing pins is that if it does pierce the primer, the hot gases will burn a pit or cavity into the firing pin. Shouldn't be a problem with hard primers.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 11:16:49 AM EDT
The decreased mass of the firing pin should decrease the chances of a slamfire when you are single loading the rifle.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 7:59:26 PM EDT
Quick refence note for the uninitiated: Titanium (Ti)is a metal Titanium Nitride (TiN) is not a metal but a a finish which is VERY hard and very lubriciant Just for info
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