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Posted: 6/7/2003 10:08:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/7/2003 11:25:37 AM EDT by 5subslr5]

Need some input/advice from the group regarding powder coating AR's. I have four or five guns that need to be refinished and see powder coating mentioned from time-to-time but I just have no experience with this process. (Fortunately there's a local guy here in Oklahoma City that I trust to properly apply the process but I just don't know enough to know if this is the way to go.)

How does the powder coating look ?? Is it shiny or can it be applied so the finish is dull ?? Any idea on endurance ??

If NOT powder coating any thoughts on a better finish ??


Edited to add: I do faithfully check when I post asking for advice. Like most of you, I've answered hundreds where you never know if the responses are even being read.

Link Posted: 6/7/2003 11:18:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/7/2003 11:19:42 AM EDT by uglygun]
Teflon/Moly or Brownells Alumahyde II would provide a better finish in my opinion. If you've ever seen a DPMS Arctic Panther I think your impression would be less than stellar. The biggest thing with the powder coated DPMS Arctic ARs was that the entire upper/lower was dipped before baking. It had that powder coating on the insides of the upper/lower which has got to do wonky things to the tolerances between moving parts. What's more, the powder coating appears to be a bit of a more shiney or glossy finish, have yet to see a dull/matte finish. I've refinished 3-4 guns using either the Brownells Alumahyde II or the Teflon/Moly coatings. When I was using the black Alumahyde II the finish or appearance was not far off from what you'd expect to see with a anodized black upper, very close finish approximation. Using OD Green and Earth Brown teflon/moly the finish comes out with a little more sheen than the Alumahyde II but no where near the gloss of powder coating. My guns with Alumahyde II and Teflon/Moly were done about 4-5 years ago, the finish is still going strong. With the Teflon/Moly or Alumahyde II, if I did get some spray into the interior it's unlikely I would be too concerned with tolerances getting thrown off because the thickness of finish is much smaller than that of powdercoat.
Link Posted: 6/7/2003 11:30:50 AM EDT
Properly applied powder coating does not involve dipping anything. Think of hanging your rifle on a wire. This wire is connected to an electrical source with a positive charge. Then, a paint sprayer is used to spray the powder onto the item being coated. This sprayer is connected to the negative terminal of the electrical source. This causes a static attraction for the powder to "stick" to the item being coated. Then, the coated object is baked. Upon baking, the powder melts and bonds with the coated item. Powder coating tends to be shiny due to how it is cured/baked. However, it is an extremely tough finish that is much stronger than other applied finishes. This is why it is so popular for motorcycle frames and wheels. The problem with the DPMS is that the parts are conveyor fed through a spray booth. The powder tends to fogand get into everywhere. If you were to have something custom coated, it would be done on an individual basis with a hand sprayer and areas that you don't want coated would be masked off. This will prevent overspray and potential clearance problems. It is up to you, but I would not be afraid to have one powder coated.
Link Posted: 6/7/2003 11:32:09 AM EDT
Why not refinish with the factory anodized/parked finish?
Link Posted: 6/7/2003 12:13:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By PsyWarrior: Properly applied powder coating does not involve dipping anything. Think of hanging your rifle on a wire. This wire is connected to an electrical source with a positive charge. Then, a paint sprayer is used to spray the powder onto the item being coated. This sprayer is connected to the negative terminal of the electrical source. This causes a static attraction for the powder to "stick" to the item being coated. Then, the coated object is baked. Upon baking, the powder melts and bonds with the coated item. Powder coating tends to be shiny due to how it is cured/baked. However, it is an extremely tough finish that is much stronger than other applied finishes. This is why it is so popular for motorcycle frames and wheels. The problem with the DPMS is that the parts are conveyor fed through a spray booth. The powder tends to fogand get into everywhere. If you were to have something custom coated, it would be done on an individual basis with a hand sprayer and areas that you don't want coated would be masked off. This will prevent overspray and potential clearance problems. It is up to you, but I would not be afraid to have one powder coated.
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I'm almost certain this guy uses a hand sprayer but I'll be 100% sure on Monday.
Link Posted: 6/9/2003 1:17:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DevL: Why not refinish with the factory anodized/parked finish?
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I may wind up doing just that. However, since I do have a local guy that I trust thought I would also see what this knowledgeable bunch thought about powder coating. (When I don't know about something I head here for advice - saves a lot of money and aggravation !)
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