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Posted: 2/25/2006 1:43:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/25/2006 1:51:59 PM EDT by The_Breakfast_Fox]
By May, I will be EMT-B certified, and I might continue on to be EMT-I certified. I'm planning on joining the military after getting a bit of medical experience. Now, here's my question: would my experience in being an EMT be detrimental to joining as a Corpsman or Combat Medic, or would it help? I know that many procedures, scopes of practice, etc. are different in the military. Would it be easier if I joined with no knowledge, so I don't have to unlearn anything? Also, if I tried to sign up as (for example) a 11b, would I be "nudged" into 91w due to my certifications?

Thanks in advance!
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 3:08:15 PM EDT
I can't see any reason why it would count against you.
Unlike the private sector, Uncle Sam has no problem with someone being 'overqualified'.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 3:28:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Breakfast_Fox:
Now, here's my question: would my experience in being an EMT be detrimental to joining as a Corpsman or Combat Medic, or would it help?



It will help as you will already have the necessary fundamentals insofar as basic anatomy, medical terminology, and basic EMT/First aid. All of which will be in the military's medical curriculum.


I know that many procedures, scopes of practice, etc. are different in the military. Would it be easier if I joined with no knowledge, so I don't have to unlearn anything?


Granted, the military does not do things exactly as the civilian side does, but the difference is negligible at best. I was a Medic before I went into the military as a Corpsman, and found my medic training to be of great benefit. It put me way ahead of the learning curve and afforded me some down time rather than having to constantly hit the books like my fellow students with no medical training...

You will, however, best be served by listening and learning the military way rather than being the one in class who always says, "But that's not we did it in..<Insert City, County EMS/Fire system here>."


Also, if I tried to sign up as (for example) a 11b, would I be "nudged" into 91w due to my certifications?


Nope. You decide what you want as an MOS! He may want to steer you in that direction based on your EMT cert, but it is your decision as to what you want to do. The usual caveat applies: Get it in writing!

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:46:29 PM EDT
Actually EMT-B is a step in the right direction, but EMT-I or P will help, however the military only recognizes the National Registry not State Certs.

I got all my certs through .mil, but you will find that real mil medics with all but the support units get to do far more than any EMT/Paramedic will ever be allowed to do.

I served as both 91B for 4 years and Corpsman for 6, Navy Corpsmen are by far the better trained military medic.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 5:49:25 AM EDT
Amen to what has already been said. I was VA state and NREMT-A before I went in. It gave me a lot of downtime to do other things when the rest of the class was forced to study.

The downside was when I got out of the Navy, my home state (VA) refused to recognize my current NC state or NREMT. They were going to force me to go back through the entire 140 hours. I said hell no and gave it up entirely. I keep my CPR up for diving and firefighting.

As for scopes of practice. As a Navy Corpsman I could suture and perform minor surgery. I frequently gave narcotic drugs to patients I was transporting to other hospitals. An VA EMT-A cannot. Our Corpsmen operated as EMT-P's without needing the state or national cert. The Navy certifications covered us for IV's, Defib, Drugs, Intubation, ACLS. However, things were changing as I got out. All Navy corpsman were being certified to NREMT-A before leaving A school.
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