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Posted: 3/24/2006 5:26:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 7:17:26 AM EDT by trippletap]
This is one of a very few PD's that have a full service auxiliary program where they get state DCJS certified and do everything the regular officers do.

Go to the FPD website and download the application in PDF format here

The Fredericksbutg Police Department is currently accepting applications for Auxiliary Police Officers. Closing Date: April 3, 2006

Applicants must be at least 21 years of age, have minimum high school education, possess good driving record and criminal-free background. Applicants must be able to withstand an intensive screening process to include a written examination, physical agility test, polygraph examination, and psychological testing along with an in-depth background investigation.

The position of auxiliary police officer is a volunteer, non-salaried position.

Applicants must possess a strong desire to serve the community in the law enforcement field. Successful applicants will attend the Rappahannock Regional Criminal Justice Academy for 11 months of extensive training to obtain full certification from the Commonwealth of Virginia as a police officer. Training will be conducted during two four-hour evenings per week and eight hours on Saturdays.

Applicants are advised that this is a time-consuming, in-depth process that requires a great deal of dedication. Minimum monthly contributions of duty time apply. Minimum training time before independent duty is one year or more. After training, auxiliary officers are expected to provide a minimum of three years service.

A Police Department application is required and may be obtained from the Police Records Bureau, 616 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401, or by sending an e-mail to: application@pd.fredericksburgva.gov.

Completed applications must be returned to the Police Records Bureau (open Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.).

Applicants must be available on Saturday, April 8, 2006, for the first phase of testing.

Salary: N/A

Closing Date: April 3, 2006

edit to add the link that I forgot to include...
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 8:11:04 AM EDT
Wow that is a lot of training for auxiliary work, ecspecially for non-paid (if I read that correctly). I know around here auxiliary officers have about 2 weeks of schooling, about the same for FTO and then they are out on their own expected to do everything except chases, fatal accidents, unattended deaths and things of that nature.

So are you doing this, or is it just a post for others???
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 8:16:45 AM EDT
Sounds like a great program for those wanting to get into police work, to try it out, or to just help their community. I started as an auxiliary much the same way
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:15:08 AM EDT
It is indeed alot of training, but it is 100% equal to the training that the regular officers get in the full-time basic, just spread out over an 11 month period...the DCJS certificate is the same for each basic school.
The reason for this is that once the auxiliary officers complete the FTO process (also the same as the regular officers, ~400 hours) they do everything the regular officers do. They do criminal patrol, undercover vice/narc operations, follow-up investigations, etc... While they may be given a call that ends up having a traffic fatality or a murder, SOP is that a detective or a traffic investigator will be called out. Qualified auxiliary officers are also eligible for positions on the bike team and SWAT team.
It's a serious program and it generally takes about two years of training before they get released to patrol by themselves, but when they reach that point they are just as qualified as any other rookie officer in the state.




Originally Posted By LEO916:
Wow that is a lot of training for auxiliary work, ecspecially for non-paid (if I read that correctly). I know around here auxiliary officers have about 2 weeks of schooling, about the same for FTO and then they are out on their own expected to do everything except chases, fatal accidents, unattended deaths and things of that nature.

So are you doing this, or is it just a post for others???

Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:19:24 AM EDT
I added a link to the FPD website employment page for anyone who is interested.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:25:24 AM EDT
It's also a good program if an experienced LEO feels like getting out of full-time LE for a while (or for good) and still wants to keep their certification. In Virginia, LE certification requires 40 hours of training every two years, and if that lapses, you have to do the whole academy again. We had a guy get out for a while, then came back with about two weeks to spare. We sent him through a week's worth of training, put him on FTO for a week just to make sure he was up to speed, and he's been running like usual ever since.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:37:46 PM EDT
Actually, that has changed somewhat.

Yes the certificate expires if in-service training is not completed within 2 years but now DCJS will allow for a longer period of time since the last in-service training to ressurect an expired certificate. It depends on the amount of time that has passed and is looked at on a case by case basis.

An aquaintance of mine never got certified after he graduated from the SWCJA academy in 2001 since he was self sponsored and never got on with a dept. to complete the state required OJT.

He is about to get appointed to a department now and when the dept. inquired with DJS they said that if they applied for a waiver and he did something like 120 hours of specific in-service training he could get his certificate.


Originally Posted By Bonk2029:
It's also a good program if an experienced LEO feels like getting out of full-time LE for a while (or for good) and still wants to keep their certification. In Virginia, LE certification requires 40 hours of training every two years, and if that lapses, you have to do the whole academy again. We had a guy get out for a while, then came back with about two weeks to spare. We sent him through a week's worth of training, put him on FTO for a week just to make sure he was up to speed, and he's been running like usual ever since.

Link Posted: 3/28/2006 2:12:04 PM EDT
I stand corrected. Still, 120 is better than 800.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 5:45:17 PM EDT
It is a long process but in my opinion well worth it. I am about half way thorugh it myself. All I need to do is finish my FTO. It has been a blast so far and I look foward to getting out on independent patrol.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 12:59:19 PM EDT
FPD has an outstanding reserve program.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:20:53 AM EDT
You ain't lying there.....having to go back through the whole academy would truely suck.



Originally Posted By Bonk2029:
I stand corrected. Still, 120 is better than 800.

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