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Posted: 2/26/2006 3:57:37 PM EDT
I am recently transferred to patrol from the Criminal Investigation Division.(Not my choice, but man my stress level is almost nothing)
I am mid level supervisor of the 3-11 shift. We field 5-13 cars a night, they are assigned to the officers but left at the station.
Now, my question to other supervisors or officers for that matter. We recently had a standoff situation where several patrol units were left near the inner perimeter, locked, running, with the headlights on. This created a safety concern for all officers on the perimeter as the lights were backlighting them. Well, the only keys to the units were with the officers(deployed on perimeter) and at the station. My idea is to have an extra set of keys made to the assigned units and keep them in my warbag on the front seat in the event of a similar situation. Does anyone else do this? or have any other ideas?
I am also thinking of asking my officers to voluntarily give me their medical information and contact information to be placed into a foldder and secured with me in the event they are injured. Does anyone else do this?
Anyway maybe this sounds dumb to more experienced supervisors and advanced departments, but I am trying to take care of my guys as most of them have around 2 years of experience on the streets anyway.

Thanks for reading this long post and for any replies.

Stay Safe.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 4:54:05 PM EDT
our supervisors have access to all the keys for all the units, we also have medical and emergency contact info in radio and can be accessed as needed
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 7:11:44 PM EDT
In the old days, all our cars had common keys for each agency. It eliminated situations like you describe - as well as the unoccupied squad parked in the way of the ambulance or engine that needs to leave the scene in a hurry...
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 7:25:48 PM EDT
We kept a key box at the office with 2-3 keys for each car by car number. Once we went to take home cars my sergeant carried an extra car key for every officer on his squad. Medical and emergency contact information is checked/updated once a year at inspection time. Adminstration gets a copy of the information and sergeant keeps a copy of the medical/emergency contact information.

Link Posted: 2/26/2006 7:56:54 PM EDT
Our supervisors had access to all keys stored in a key box but for the last three years, all patrol units have the same key.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 8:16:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/26/2006 8:17:26 PM EDT by LEO916]
Each of our officers are assigned two (2) keys to each car. We have 2 marked cars, and one unmarked car and I have my own cruiser for my K-9. So in the cold winter we can keep the cars running and lock them, but have a key on you. I like it this way so i can keep the car running for my dog in the winter, but still lock the doors. But someone would have to be stupid to get in my car when it was running with a k-9 in it anyways.

The medical thing, all medical information is kept by dispatch, so in the event you need it, they can access it.

Hope the stand-off was successful and no one was hurt

Be Safe
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 8:36:01 PM EDT
i really appreciate the replies. The suspect in the stand off decided how it would end. She is recovering in a trauma ward but will live.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 7:50:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 7:58:30 PM EDT
All our vehicles are keyed the same. Seems a smart thing to do.

Med and contact info is in personnel file.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:05:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tango7:
In the old days, all our cars had common keys for each agency. It eliminated situations like you describe - as well as the unoccupied squad parked in the way of the ambulance or engine that needs to leave the scene in a hurry...




We have a huge fleet and common keys.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 7:25:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tango7:
In the old days, all our cars had common keys for each agency. It eliminated situations like you describe - as well as the unoccupied squad parked in the way of the ambulance or engine that needs to leave the scene in a hurry...



+1 All are cars are still keyed the same. The reasons are many while the limitations are few.
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