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Posted: 2/23/2006 4:26:42 PM EDT
I am filling out an application for a reserve officer at a local police department. I don't think most of them do in Minnesota.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:33:25 PM EDT
Not that I'm aware of. I was a Police Reserve with a suburban PD, and we weren't allowed to carry a gun when on duty, even if we had a CCW. (though i don't think any of us did - this was 10+ years ago when it was rather difficult to get one) However, if the SHTF we were got dibs on the 12ga in the cruisers....

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:54:33 PM EDT
I served as a Reserve Deputy in both Tennessee and South Carolina. All of the Reserve Officers/Deputies were/are armed. In fact, in Tennessee and South Carolina, we worked solo and as totally integrated deputies
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:57:39 PM EDT
my cousin is reserve officer in cleveland, tennessee and he carries on duty....it must be department specific. I could not imagine going on domestic calls and such as just a ride along and not being armed as well and trying to make arrests...hinking.gif
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 5:25:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Brock63:
my cousin is reserve officer in cleveland, tennessee and he carries on duty....it must be department specific. I could not imagine going on domestic calls and such as just a ride along and not being armed as well and trying to make arrests...



Me neither.

I would like to support an officer on regular duty but it sounds like reserves are only used for DWI / arrest tows, crime / accident scene help, traffic control, and events. For those things I think moving vehicles are what I need to worry about most. I would rather carry that not carry but I would still do it without.

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 5:26:48 PM EDT
I was a Special/Reserve PO for a small town department for 18 years. We went thru a R/I Academy, qualified with firearms 2x/year (until later years when they dropped everyone down to 1x/year), was CPR and First Responder. We worked with FT POs as well as shifts (paid) and details (paid) where we were expected to do anything/everything that a FT PO did.

We were armed until my last year when a new chief came in and decided we were a "liability" and disarmed us while on duty. Most of us resigned either immediately or within a year. I lasted out a year and "retired" if you will. Within a few years he disbanded what was left of the force. Later he allowed up to 8 Special Officers work under a FT Lt., provided that they were on the Civil Service List, went thru the Academy, took a psych test, etc.

Even in MA, this varies greatly from town to town. Since MA has no state mandated firearms qualification program (they have a "recommended" one, but local PDs are free to do as they please), some towns work their Special/Auxiliary/Reserves unarmed (and untrained) and some are fully qualified and armed. All officers are supposed to attend the R/I Academy.

So, you need to inquire of the department you are interested in to get the answer that will apply to you.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:20:21 PM EDT
About 15 years ago I knew a P/T cop who carried... he was later involved in an off duty (and out of state) incident that restricted the carry ability of the part timers, and the evenutual decomissioning of the p/t unit in that town.

A few years later, the changed the P/T requirements - "grandfathered" officers (the 120 hour class) kept their status, all new candidates had to go through the (8 week - 320 hour) equivalent academy classes - some hands on, some on-line.

The "reserve deputies" who are part of the LCSD are prohibited from carrying, even though many of them completed the full time academy or are former (retired) F/T sworn officers.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 10:45:52 PM EDT
I'm a Reserve officer here in FL and the only difference here between reserve and full-time is the pay check. Auxillary on the otherhand is a different story.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 11:03:59 PM EDT
here reserves pretty much do everything that full-timers can do except high speed chases or deal with PI / fatal accidents

the only restriction they have is the number of hours in a year they can work
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 8:05:57 AM EDT
My department has about 20 auxiliary police officers. All are sworn, state certified and carry on/off duty. All uniforms, equpment and training is provided by the department. They receive no compensation while working for the city but can work paid "off-duty" details along with the full-time officers.

All of them are required to go through the regional academy (16 hours a week for 11 months = approx 700 hours total, same as the regular officers) and then pass a 400+ hour field training program (again, same as the regular officers). Once they finish the FT program they are expected to patrol solo.

They are required to carry off duty within one mile of the city and encouraged to carry off duty everywhere. Their powers, authority and immunities are specifically laid out in the State Code of Virginia under part B of § 15.2-1731 ( http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+15.2-1731 ). There is no similar code section for "reserve" officers or deputies. They are usually just part-time paid employees of their various departments where auxiliaries are part-time un-paid employees.

Here in Virginia, some departments have auxiliary programs that are similar to my departments but most do not. They may swear in the auxiliaries but usually do not arm them and they usually don't sent them through a full academy, armed or not.

If done right, where the auxiliary or reserve officers have to meet the same requirements as the regular officers, a reserve/auxiliary program can be a great asset to a department. If done wrong, it can be a big liability.



Link Posted: 2/24/2006 9:33:39 AM EDT
I am a reserve in a MN city. We don't get to carry. We are trained in the handgun and M4 and if SHTF there is a little button and if the officer doesn't take it, we can use the M4.

I've been on a couple felony stops and been a part of the arrest detail, never had a weapon other than a baton and spray.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 10:18:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bowhntr6pt:
I served as a Reserve Deputy in both Tennessee and South Carolina. All of the Reserve Officers/Deputies were/are armed. In fact, in Tennessee and South Carolina, we worked solo and as totally integrated deputies



I'm not saying this to knock anyone, but I have a friend that's an auxillary for Tusculum PD., and I'm amazed at the power they give him.

He's allowd to carry, write tickets, make arrests, and so on. I see the need for extra help, and the volunteer status being convenient. What kind baffles me when you think about it though, is that they're letting an average person off the street play cop without any formal training other than riding with someone.
It just sorta seems unfair to regular full-time cops. It's disrespectful, in a round about way.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 2:16:21 PM EDT
If you recall they let Elvis (play COP) Nixon even made him a D.E.A. agent I forget what capacity though. Kinda ironic in a tragic way Elvis The D.E.A. and the way he died. This connection is a root of some of the conspiricy theorys about Elvis being alive.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 2:31:54 PM EDT
For Montana the answer to your question is hell yes we carry firearms.
Wear the same uniform except our brass is a different color, we also are welcome to any of the training that is put on for the regulars.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 2:37:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/24/2006 2:37:42 PM EDT by DigDug]
Depends on the department.

We have to stay certified on everything the fulltimers do. OC, Cuffing, PPCT, CPR, First Aid, Defensive Driving, Firearms Qual, etc...

And yes, we carry on duty. It is part of the uniform and is required. We wear the same uniforms as the full timers. Badge and brass all the same.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:28:11 PM EDT
In the Woodbury County Sheriff's Reserves, Iowa.... we do carry sidearms.

I know in Manona County (directly south of Woodbury), Iowa the Sheriif's Reserves do NOT carry under any circumstance. They are lucky to carry OC spray and an Asp.

Many LE agencies have a year of duty without the sidearm to make sure the reserve officer is *sane* enough to carry. Here in Woodbury County, we weed the bad ones out quickly so after the 9 months of the weekly meeting basic training.... we usually know the good ones from the not-so-good ones.

It is all based on the choice of the police chief or the sheriff.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:33:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Toydeluxe:

Originally Posted By Bowhntr6pt:
I served as a Reserve Deputy in both Tennessee and South Carolina. All of the Reserve Officers/Deputies were/are armed. In fact, in Tennessee and South Carolina, we worked solo and as totally integrated deputies



I'm not saying this to knock anyone, but I have a friend that's an auxillary for Tusculum PD., and I'm amazed at the power they give him.

He's allowd to carry, write tickets, make arrests, and so on. I see the need for extra help, and the volunteer status being convenient. What kind baffles me when you think about it though, is that they're letting an average person off the street play cop without any formal training other than riding with someone.
It just sorta seems unfair to regular full-time cops. It's disrespectful, in a round about way.



Actually, most states have very specifc rules regarding reserve officers and their yearly training. Here in Iowa, a reserve officer has the full rights and duties as a regular LEO, but the local LE agency usually keeps them in back-up mode more than anything. We have 23 members in our unit, but only 4 of us have the clearance to perform to the same level as regular deputies (due to our aptitude, experience, and familarity). No LE agency just gives a walk on volunteer a badge, a gun, and points them toward the street. No way.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:36:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jeager001:
For Montana the answer to your question is hell yes we carry firearms.
Wear the same uniform except our brass is a different color, we also are welcome to any of the training that is put on for the regulars.



That seems to be the same thing here in my county. We have silver 6pt star-badges, but the regulars deputies have gold 7pt star-badges. We also have a rocker patch that says "Reserve" above our shoulder patches. But again, it is all up to he local chief or sheriff.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 11:24:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JRBL1A1:

That seems to be the same thing here in my county. We have silver 6pt star-badges, but the regulars deputies have gold 7pt star-badges. We also have a rocker patch that says "Reserve" above our shoulder patches. But again, it is all up to he local chief or sheriff.



We used to have the rocker, but it went away because of safety concerns. People thought they could get away with more with reserves thinking that we didn't have the same powers as a full-time officer while we are on duty (they are wrong).
So, we just go with silver instead of gold, badge is the same except it is silver and says "Reserve Deputy" instead of "Deputy Sheriff" on it. Most people don't look closely enough to notice the difference.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:30:20 AM EDT
The dept that I will be going to has its reserve officers carry while working and requires us to maintain a current Mi. CCW. We also have to carry a 9MM or .40 S&W pistol that the dept accepts limited to a Glock,H&K,Sig,S&W, or Beretta. I know that some reserve guys only have a baton,spray, and a radio. I would not feel safe wearing a uniform performing police duties and not be armed. Some people only see the badge and they go on auto hate mode.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:17:22 AM EDT
Our reserve officers are all fully certified. They all carry on duty. The chief allows some to carry off duty, not all.



________________________________


Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:28:04 PM EDT
I went though this about 2 years ago in White Bear Lake, MN. I was told that per MN State Staute 626.84 Sub 1(e) a reserve officer could NOT carry a sidearm. I wasn't comfortable with that so I withdrew my application.

From 628.84 Sub 1

(e) "Reserve officer" means an individual whose services
are utilized by a law enforcement agency to provide
supplementary assistance at special events, traffic or crowd
control, and administrative or clerical assistance. A reserve
officer's duties do not include enforcement of the general
criminal laws of the state, and the officer does not have full
powers of arrest or authorization to carry a firearm on duty.



Let us know what you find out. If this were to change, either by law or department policy (can a dept policy over ride this? I would think not), I would reconsider my current position.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:32:51 PM EDT
I don't think anyone should be on the street, in uniform, without a weapon.

________________________________




Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:45:49 PM EDT
I am a Reserve Deputy Sheriff in GA and we are armed. In fact, I was issued a M14 (WRA ) during the G-8 summit here in '04. We are POST certified and expected to meet all of the standards and training requirements of the full time deputies. Most of us worked full time for other departments before moving back into the civilian sector but we still want to stay involved in le.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 4:24:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 4:25:29 PM EDT by ford_shooter]
Our reserve unit carries here in Iowa. New reserves like me get a firearm after working 40 hours in the county jail then riding 80 hours on the road unarmed with the full time deputies but we have access to the shotgun if it is needed. After the 80 hours on the road, we get our Sig 2340 and qual once or twice a year( can't remember for sure).
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 5:34:05 PM EDT
Way back in the day (28 years ago), I started out as a reserve officer for a small town police department. Back then, all you needed was a semester long college class on firearms use, laws of arrest and search and seizure. You also needed a first aid course. In the agency I worked for, reserves were primarily the backup units to the regular officers, but we did fly solo if approved by the Chief.

This was the preferred method of trying out prospective full time officers for a year or so to see if they could cut it as a regular trooper. Sometime in the 80's they changed the minimum requirements for reserve officers, so that you needed to complete an academy before they let you on the street. Most agencies did away with the reserve programs as they became too much of a liability in the eyes of the administration.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 10:11:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MNArcher:
Not that I'm aware of. I was a Police Reserve with a suburban PD, and we weren't allowed to carry a gun when on duty, even if we had a CCW. (though i don't think any of us did - this was 10+ years ago when it was rather difficult to get one) However, if the SHTF we were got dibs on the 12ga in the cruisers....




NO WAY!??! I would NOT get into a patrol car and work without a sidearm!! Unbelievable!
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 1:49:56 PM EDT
I saw the MN state law here a minute ago for reserves, so here's the MT one for contrast:



7-32-218. Status of reserve officer upon activation.
A reserve officer is vested with the same powers, rights, privileges, obligations, and duties as any other peace officer of this state upon being activated by the chief law enforcement administrator of the local government and while on assigned duty only.



The on duty only part was added to protect the full-time guys so the department would not try to get a whole bunch of free manpower to augment their shifts instead of hiring more full-time officers. Or, that's how it was explained to me anyway.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 7:55:15 AM EDT
Virginia code doesn't have anything about reserve's. Law enforcement is broken up into two categories, paid deputies and officers and auxiliary deputies and officers.

The state code pertaining to auxiliary officers is :

§ 15.2-1731. Establishment, etc., authorized; powers, authority and immunities generally.

A. Localities, for the further preservation of the public peace, safety and good order of the community, may establish, equip and maintain auxiliary police forces, the members of which when called into service as hereinafter provided shall have all the powers and authority and all the immunities of constables at common law.

B. Localities also may establish, equip and maintain auxiliary police forces which have all the powers and authority and all the immunities of full-time law-enforcement officers, if all such forces have met the training requirements established by the Department of Criminal Justice Services under § 9.1-101. Any auxiliary officer employed prior to July 1, 1987, shall be exempted from any initial training requirement, except that any such officer shall not be permitted to carry or use a firearm while serving as an auxiliary police officer unless such officer has met the firearms training requirements established in accordance with in-service training standards for law-enforcement officers as prescribed by the Criminal Justice Services Board.

(1968, c. 157, § 15.1-159.2; 1987, c. 421; 1988, c. 864; 1997, c. 587.)


The auxiliary officers who fall under part "B" have 24/7 police powers.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 2:39:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 2:41:21 PM EDT by Spenc79]
I'm a reserve deputy in Iowa. Our S.O. allows us the same privelages and responsibility as full time deputies. We fill patrol shifts with another reserve, full timer or ocassionally by ourselves, help with investigations, the drug task force and pretty much anywhere else they need help. We have a 6-12 month probation period of no uniform, no weapon. Iowa has minimum training requirements for reserves, and it is my understanding that the state reserve association is working on getting more strict training requirements. The local PD reserves carry, I think, but can only ride along with fulltimers and don't do much more than traffic control.

Edited for spelling
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:43:53 PM EDT
We call our reserves "unpaid sworn". They are sworn but not paid and so have all the rights and priviledges of regular staff including off-duty weapon carry policies.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:20:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DigDug:
Depends on the department.

We have to stay certified on everything the fulltimers do. OC, Cuffing, PPCT, CPR, First Aid, Defensive Driving, Firearms Qual, etc...

And yes, we carry on duty. It is part of the uniform and is required. We wear the same uniforms as the full timers. Badge and brass all the same.




+1 Here in Arkansas. We have to purchase our own weapons and we carry them while on duty. They have to be either Glock 22 or 23 and we qualify with them 4 times a year plus night shoots.

Link Posted: 3/3/2006 6:02:39 AM EDT
There is a reserve police oriented law enforcement website now that may have some good info about reserve/auxiliary programs.

http://forums.reservecops.com/

It's open to anyone, but reserve, auxiliary and full-time LEO's can get into secure forums there as well.

Link Posted: 3/3/2006 12:29:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JRBL1A1:

Originally Posted By Toydeluxe:

Originally Posted By Bowhntr6pt:
I served as a Reserve Deputy in both Tennessee and South Carolina. All of the Reserve Officers/Deputies were/are armed. In fact, in Tennessee and South Carolina, we worked solo and as totally integrated deputies



I'm not saying this to knock anyone, but I have a friend that's an auxillary for Tusculum PD., and I'm amazed at the power they give him.

He's allowd to carry, write tickets, make arrests, and so on. I see the need for extra help, and the volunteer status being convenient. What kind baffles me when you think about it though, is that they're letting an average person off the street play cop without any formal training other than riding with someone.
It just sorta seems unfair to regular full-time cops. It's disrespectful, in a round about way.



Actually, most states have very specifc rules regarding reserve officers and their yearly training. Here in Iowa, a reserve officer has the full rights and duties as a regular LEO, but the local LE agency usually keeps them in back-up mode more than anything. We have 23 members in our unit, but only 4 of us have the clearance to perform to the same level as regular deputies (due to our aptitude, experience, and familarity). No LE agency just gives a walk on volunteer a badge, a gun, and points them toward the street. No way.




No way, you say?

You're welcome anytime to pay a visit on a Friday night, and I'll show that person. NO TRAINING, whatsoever, other than on-the-job, and he has already written tickets, carries a gun, and a uniform no different than the rest.

I think it's BS.

I'm working my ass off just to get hired to an agency, and then go through the academy. All he did was "know the right person".
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 1:48:21 PM EDT
Oklahoma County Sherriff reserve deputies carry weapons, are state certified as a reserve officer and commissioned by the Sheriff. The training reserves receive is identical for full-timers -- except they don't get LEDT certified. Law block, defensive tactics training, firearms and all other training requirements are the same as any other full-time LEO in Oklahoma. Many reserves also go on to get LEDT certified, too. The only thing that distinguishes a reserve from a full time deputy is one word on their commission card: "Reserve" Deputy Sheriff. Badge, uniform, responsiblities and law enforcement authority is the same as any other state-certified LEO. Reserves have the same yearly training requirements as full-timers, too. Reserves work patrol, bomb squad, tactical unit, investigations, community services, warrants, etc.

OCSO reserves pay for all their personal gear -- uniform, weapons, body armor, etc.. The only thing they are given are their badge & commission card. Everything else is out of their pocket.

IMO, wearing a police uniform without being armed is just STUPID. Too many nuts out there who would love to kill a cop.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 7:18:37 PM EDT
When I was a Reserve, we were fully comissioned Officers. Hence, we were outfitted exactly like the full timers.
Link Posted: 3/4/2006 6:47:16 AM EDT
I'm not sure about other agencies, but our Sheriff reserves can carry, but they must provide their own sidearm.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 6:39:27 AM EDT
It seems that different states have different training requirements for "reserves" and "auxiliary" officers. In NC, they are required to have the same basic training as full time officers and therefore have the same authority.

I worked as a reserve for 8 years and carried a handgun whenever I was on duty.

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