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Posted: 2/10/2006 11:09:05 PM EDT
What personal tools if any do yall prefer? I was looking at a couple, one is called the "yes tool" and another is the "fire max 14 in 1". Thanx



The yes tool
http://www.edarley.com/edarley4/catalog.cfm?dest=itempg&itemid=8609&secid=128&linkon=subsection&linkid=377


The firemax
http://www.thefirestore.com/store/product.cfm?pID=2458

Link Posted: 2/10/2006 11:12:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 11:33:59 PM EDT
IMHO...save your money, and use the stuff they issue to you and the equipment on your truck.
(unless, of course your equipment is lacking)
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 12:07:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By madmedic:
IMHO...save your money, and use the stuff they issue to you and the equipment on your truck.
(unless, of course your equipment is lacking)



+1 I dont need to weight myself down with more tools. What I can grab off the truck will do great!
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 6:48:00 AM EDT
We have a Fire Max on the engine & have yet to use it. It seems like a sweet little tool for the "officers" who don't do much but stand around and watch j/k, I'm one of those officers and we don't stand around and watch

Otherwise I've got a couple tools on my person & everything else is on da engines we grab according to assignments or seat positions.
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 7:20:20 AM EDT
The Probar 30" Halligan bar I have is my personal tool of choice. A D-handle 5ft roof hook would be a second choice.
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 8:19:28 AM EDT
To me it really depends on what you ride, are you on an engine or truck?? For truck work I like a 4' New York roof hook, for engine work I use an 8lb sledgehammer or a closet hook.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 10:07:02 AM EDT
I usually carry a 8# maul that has be modified to have a more an axe blade to it.

when I was just a grunt on the rescue I also carried a 30" pro bar (the chief bought the pined crappy type for $20 more than a "real" bar costs)


Now that I am capt on the engine I am leaning to buying a 5' NY roof hook there is never a hook around when you need one, now where to stash it in the cab
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 10:05:28 PM EDT
30" halligan or the famous pick axe

both have the capability to save you from a fall by jabbin the pick in call me old fashoin but being the interiorattack/search and resue guy i use a pick axe most of the calls a halligan has its uses but lacks the cutting and smashing power of my trusty axe

i guess it all depends on the kind of building and also the duties you are exspeting to have to proform

size up
take care brother and stay safe
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 12:15:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockster19:
.... call me old fashoin but being the interiorattack/search and resue guy i use a pick axe most of the calls a halligan has its uses but lacks the cutting and smashing power of my trusty axe......



What are you "cutting and smashing" that a halligan bar cant destroy?
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 12:34:42 PM EDT
IMHO, stay far away from that FireMax POS! It was designed by some Orange/Osceola Co. guys that, while looks cool and seems like a good idea, don't know much about metalurgy(sp?).

Their rep. brought some by my department trying to sell them before they had a national distributor. The rep says that the claw part of it will pull hinges off of a commercial steel door in a steel frame, so we have our smallest guy there ( 5'5" 135lbs.) try it out. He put the claw on one of our doors here and pulled down without exerting much effort. Man you should have seen the look on the reps face when it broke into about 5 pieces.

We appalogised for breaking his toy and everyone just walked away!

556mm
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 10:39:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 556mm:
IMHO, stay far away from that FireMax POS! It was designed by some Orange/Osceola Co. guys that, while looks cool and seems like a good idea, don't know much about metalurgy(sp?).

Their rep. brought some by my department trying to sell them before they had a national distributor. The rep says that the claw part of it will pull hinges off of a commercial steel door in a steel frame, so we have our smallest guy there ( 5'5" 135lbs.) try it out. He put the claw on one of our doors here and pulled down without exerting much effort. Man you should have seen the look on the reps face when it broke into about 5 pieces.

We appalogised for breaking his toy and everyone just walked away!

556mm



yikes. sounds like the tempering process or whatever made it too brittle. hopefully they've fixed that. As for personal tools, i've used my Denver tool for a few years now and have been very satisfied with it. it's more of a back-up/self-rescue tool for me than anything.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 6:49:01 AM EDT
This one looks sweet:



STRIDER CR
The CR is designed to be a hard substance destruction tool. The materials and construction are intended to give optimum impact and prying strength.

The CR works as a system. The base of which is a .285” thick 6AL4V titanium head, with .775” thick cantilevered S7 impact bits. S7 is an incredibly strong material, most commonly seen on “Jackhammer” bits. The CR bits pivot on .312” diameter 416 stainless steel custom made shoulder bolts that have been tapered and crowned to protect them from impact and abrasion. The system is designed to remove all stress on the bolts by letting the bits pivot on the head and strike a steel anvil (bit) against a titanium anvil (head).

In addition to removing bolt stress, this cantilever action also allows for a multi-strike action of the bits. The initial strike is achieved with human force by swinging the tool against a surface. The secondary strike is caused by the inertial force of the collapsing cantilever system. By using this system, the axe is actually working as a human powered Jackhammer.

The user is protected both from impact shock, as well as electrical shock by a Delrin sleeve (handle) that fits over the titanium tang of the impact head. The sleeve is then filled with silicone which acts as a damper for impact vibration.



*Notes on the CR.

Feel free to impact any surface. (Sheet metal, glass, concrete, tarmac…)
The Edges are not intended to be “sharp”.
The heads are supposed to be able to move. (It’s the cantilever system).
Its supposed to make that rattle sound. (It’s the cantilever system).
The impact bits are made of S7 and coated with black oxide. They are not stainless.

bluelinegear.com/striderCR.htm
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:52:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jvic:
This one looks sweet:

bluelinegear.com/images/CR.jpg



those things always look cool. i've never had a chance to swing one though. i'm always a little skeptical that they are very effective since they are so light. When its go time, i always grab something w/ some weight to it.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 10:42:19 AM EDT
I have seen some pics of it used against a car an it opens up the sheet metal pretty nicely. Apparently it works good on safety glass as well...



Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:06:31 PM EDT
The strider CR is a loose "copy" of RMJ Forges www.rmjforge.com/Tactical%20Tomahawks.htm hawk. RMJ came up with the Hawk for Security Forces and that spawned the crash hawk.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 9:42:21 PM EDT
Shrike

dont get me wrong a haligan is a fine weapon of choice but i prefr a pick axe, for me its comfortable and its just the tooli would prefer if i had to make a hole for emergencies, we mostly deal with ald far houses and modern two story houses, and if i gotta cut through a wall i would rather swing an axe then try to "bash threw with a haligan"

i guess its preference and most of this depends on the call, and the structure and duty you have have to perform, some choose haligan most house fires i choose a pick axe, ive im going into a industrial structure i would definatly choose the haligan for the many uses it has!

all in the preference
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