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Posted: 11/23/2002 6:40:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/23/2002 6:48:35 AM EDT by M4_Aiming_at_U]
A two-part question.... I have been going to college studying criminal justice part time and also working part time. Due to my situation, I would like to postpone going to school right now, and begin working. Then possibly taking advantage of "Tuition Reimbursement" type of incentives that many L.E. Agencies offer later to finish getting my CRJU degree. 1. I have traveled to many states in the USA and the Maryland and Delaware area is NOT where I want to live long term. Is it likely that if I apply to an agency in CO, WA, OR or WY that they will even consider hiring me? I don’t mind traveling there for interviews. 2.Credit Checks? What’s up with some agencies doing this? I really don’t have a great credit history. I have never gone bankrupt or anything (or even come close) but lets just say that if I were to buy a house I would probably get a terrible interest rate. Will this affect my chances of getting hired? Thanks in advance for any help that you may be able to provide me.
Link Posted: 11/23/2002 9:57:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By M4_Aiming_at_U: A two-part question.... I would like to postpone going to school right now, and begin working. Then possibly taking advantage of "Tuition Reimbursement" type of incentives that many L.E. Agencies offer later to finish getting my CRJU degree.
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I've never heard of that. Most local Govt's are strapped for cash right now and it won't get any better in the near future. I'd say those programs where ever they exist will soon be gone.
1. I have traveled to many states in the USA and the Maryland and Delaware area is NOT where I want to live long term. Is it likely that if I apply to an agency in CO, WA, OR or WY that they will even consider hiring me? I don’t mind traveling there for interviews.
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Some places have a requirement that you must be a resident for a specific amount of time prior to your employment to be eligible. Chose an area that is growing and is predicted to grow in the future. Stay away from areas where the economy is based on old industry such as steel or heavy manufacturing. You also don't want a place where the economy relies on a couple of major employers. When the businesses shut down the local economy goes to shit along with the tax base.
2.Credit Checks? What’s up with some agencies doing this? I really don’t have a great credit history. I have never gone bankrupt or anything (or even come close) but lets just say that if I were to buy a house I would probably get a terrible interest rate. Will this affect my chances of getting hired?
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Good credit is a sign of financial responsibility and self discipline. That translates into what is likely a mature, responsible applicant. You don't want to bestow the responsibilities that come with being a Peace Officer on someone who has shown a propensity towards irresponsibility and immaturity. I've done a few back ground investigations on applicants. Good credit is not a killer but it is very important. All other things being equal, I will pick the guy with a good credit history over the one with the bad credit.
Link Posted: 11/23/2002 1:44:47 PM EDT
Most departments won't hire without at least a 2yr degree. So, get your associate degree, and have the dept pay for your BA, MA, etc. St.Johns Univ in Springfield La specializes in CJ degrees through distance learning. This is attractive to those working rotating shifts and is also much cheaper than the traditional classroom setting. As for a credit check, good credit shows responsibility....
Link Posted: 11/23/2002 4:05:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/23/2002 4:06:29 PM EDT by natez]
We hire without college, although it helps (and also makes you eligible for incentive pay). We have a hiring preference for Spanish proficiency. We also have $4500 a year in tutition reimbursement, and have take home cars, free dry cleaning, and all equipment and weapons issued. Our pay is very competitive for the area, and includes a graduated step system that brings officers into the mid range in two years, and performance bonuses at the end of the year. Cost of living is slightly higher than the regional average here, but our regional average is significantly lower than the East or West Coast areas. We probably won't do another hiring process until spring, but we have been hiring rapidly over the last several years, and have not had anyone "die" on our eligibility list since I have worked here. Credit history is important because they want to make sure that you are a responsible person who generally makes sound decisions, and personal finances are and indicator of that. They also don't want officers who can be easily blackmailed, either. If you had problems in the past but have worked through them, like typical college debt, they will consider the totality of the circumstances. Honsety is the best policy.
Link Posted: 11/24/2002 8:18:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sukebe: Good credit is a sign of financial responsibility and self discipline. That translates into what is likely a mature, responsible applicant. You don't want to bestow the responsibilities that come with being a Peace Officer on someone who has shown a propensity towards irresponsibility and immaturity. I've done a few back ground investigations on applicants. Good credit is not a killer but it is very important. All other things being equal, I will pick the guy with a good credit history over the one with the bad credit.
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Here is a clear cut answer on the credit question. Have you looked into specific departments? Some will hire without a 4 year degree. It is getting harder to find those that will though. Any military background?
Link Posted: 11/28/2002 11:21:27 PM EDT
2.Credit Checks? What’s up with some agencies doing this? I really don’t have a great credit history. I have never gone bankrupt or anything (or even come close) but lets just say that if I were to buy a house I would probably get a terrible interest rate. Will this affect my chances of getting hired?
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get your degree, it really does help. as far as the credit question, i agree with all the above responses, but here's my .02: a credit check reveals your debt to income ratio. it will tell me how much in debt you are and we already know how much you would make with our department. doing simple math proves that you can pay your bills on what you would be paid upon licensure in our department. another reason is that the larger credit risk (i.e. bankruptcy, late pays, repo's etc.), the greater chance that a candidate would likely accept a bribe (hurtin' for cash). good luck!
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:39:25 PM EDT
Check into the Georgia Police corps........i think they do that
Link Posted: 12/9/2002 6:49:14 AM EDT
Individuals exhibiting a poor history of financial responsibility are thought to be more susecptible to the temptations on the job and engage in corupt actvities in an effort to relieve those financial presures.
Link Posted: 12/13/2002 11:02:32 AM EDT
My dept (MD) does not require college. The only thing that has less to do with police work than the academy in college. I prefer to train ex military. Just my $.02
Link Posted: 12/13/2002 11:18:39 AM EDT
My dept. does not require any college, although a two-year degree is prefered. We also have some tuition reimbursment, although only essentially a two-year program locally, you have to drive to get your four-year. I think we do credit checks during the background, and while I'm not sure, what you're describing doesn't sound like it would be a huge problem, if you acknowledged that you'd had problems, and why. No residency requirement to be hired, we've hired a few people from out of state, although these have generally been people with previous LE experiance. I just saw the notice last night, we're hiring! We sometimes (not very often) hire people and pay there way through academy, but usually people have to pay for that upfront, and then get hired. dp
Link Posted: 12/13/2002 11:37:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/13/2002 11:38:41 AM EDT by Reactionary]
I don't have any LE experience, but I can tell you that if possible, it's usually better to get school out of the way first, and as fast as possible. Think about it this way. You can spend 3 or 4 years getting your degree and then start working a good paying job. 10 years down the road you're in good shape. If you work for a few years at low pay, then go back to school part time (working part time for low pay), 10 years down the road you are finally getting your degree and just starting to work for a decent wage. You will be better off over the long run by completing school first. I would stay in school, full time, get your degree and then find work. Of course if you have a family that might be out of the question.
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