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Posted: 11/17/2005 8:25:53 PM EDT

Not sure if I should post this in History or General.

Kind of an interesting site. Guy finds pictures in old cameras and develops them.
Link Posted: 11/17/2005 8:36:29 PM EDT
nice find

esp the "Argus A - a soldiers camera"
Link Posted: 11/17/2005 8:38:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/17/2005 8:59:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
nice find

esp the "Argus A - a soldiers camera"



I'm pretty sure that series was taken in Italy. Not sure though (never am). In it there are a few taken of what looks to be a POW compound with a shot of a Thompson in a guard tower/post.
Link Posted: 11/17/2005 10:32:40 PM EDT
Found that link on an old house discussion board awhile back. Really cool to see pictures taken so long ago and never seen before now.
Link Posted: 11/20/2005 5:15:17 AM EDT
I doubt that you will ever see 60 year old digital pictures. That's why I still like film. Something about the smell of fixer.
Link Posted: 11/21/2005 7:01:27 PM EDT
It is neat to do that, my grandpa has an old German camera he traded a German soldier or citizen(not sure which) couple packs of Camel's for right after the war. He used it for quite a while. I recently got it out and messing with it turns out there was a roll of film in it half used. Got it developed and it was pictures of my dad back in the late 60s or early 70s, absolutely hilarious. Turns out he did have hair at one point, lots of it.
Link Posted: 11/22/2005 9:39:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaweidert:
I doubt that you will ever see 60 year old digital pictures. That's why I still like film. Something about the smell of fixer.



Besides which, darkroom work is actually rather relaxing.
Link Posted: 11/22/2005 5:08:31 PM EDT
That is pretty cool. I found a box of old pics that were in the basment of my old house. I think that one of the jids must have made a time capsel of sorts. There were pics from when the house must have been new judging by the size of the trees. The Musscle cars on the street were awesome.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 12:51:18 PM EDT
I used to run a photo/camera shop in the 1990s and used to get a lot of people bringing in old rolls of b/w film that they had found in cameras. Usually VerichromePan or Panatomic-X- the occasional Agfa or Ilford roll, too. Old color films using outdated process (C-22, etc.) had to be sent to a special outfit in CO. I always got the customers to pay ahead of time, non-refundable, since I had no idea whether there was anything on the rolls and the B/W rolls I had to develop myself at home that night.

Got some amazing shots of Korean War era army base life, 1960s, 1970s local life, lots of bell bottom trousers, long hair, beards, mustaches, etc. Funny old cars, lots of fins and chrome. Occasionally pictures of long-dead family members, making some people start to tear up and sob when they saw them.


Speaking of old film, I occasionally use very old cameras with very old b/w film that's been frozen since the 1970s and 1980s. (I keep it in a spare refrigerator.) Mostly 122 size film in Kodak 3A Autographic and 3A Graflex cameras. Makes some interesting pics from those big negatives.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 12:55:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:

Originally Posted By gaweidert:
I doubt that you will ever see 60 year old digital pictures. That's why I still like film. Something about the smell of fixer.



Besides which, darkroom work is actually rather relaxing.



+1! It will be a sad day when the envirolibs finally outlaw it.
Link Posted: 12/21/2005 5:53:52 PM EDT
Digital photography and emailed pictures are all well and good, but they'll never replace the feeling one gets when looking through old pictures taken with cameras that were obsolete years ago.

I treasure a picture of 5 of my family members, all on horseback, wearing wooly leggings, pencil rolled stetsons, silk scarves and wool coats. The date on the back says Dec 24, 1908.
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