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Posted: 3/3/2002 1:54:46 PM EDT
That's right, a walk-in concrete gun/ammo closet in my basement. The walls are 8" thick with steel reinforcement rods in a 1' grid. The inside dimensions are 3'6" by 6'4" with a ceiling height of 6 feet (I am 5'11"). After pouring the 6' high walls (two walls- in an "L" shape) into a corner of my basement, I poured a 5" thick cap over the top of it (also with reinforcement rods). I fabricated the door system and frame out of steel and set it in the forms before pouring the concrete. I could tell you how the door system works, but then I'd have to kill you. Took a total of 3 1/2 yards of concrete. It is now wired, but before I start putting stuff in it, I have to get a little heater or something to cook off the moisture. BTW, I am in the concrete business, in case you are wondering. Can't wait to use it!
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 1:57:35 PM EDT
How did you pour the ceiling? Did you have to take up a floor, or is this new construction? -elliott
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:01:29 PM EDT
Pics?
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:07:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By elliott: How did you pour the ceiling? Did you have to take up a floor, or is this new construction?
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The whole process was very labor intensive. My house is 50 years old (we bought it a year and a half ago) so everything had to be done the hard way. The Concrete Mixer drove up to the bulkhead and its chutes reached down into the basement. I had to fill up a wheel-barrow and move it to the forms then shovel the crete in. To pour the cap, I nailed a thin sheet of plywood to the floor joists and just heaved the crete up and over the walls by the shovelful. The plywood acted as a backstop and protector for the floor joists. It wasn't easy, but is definitely worth the effort. The finished product is fire proof and pretty secure from most thieves. Only the most dedicated bad-guys will be threats to this thing.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:09:52 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22: Pics?
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I do have regular photos of the bunker taken during the whole process, but no digital pics. There is a possibility a buddy of mine can post some pics (he has a dig camera).
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:11:08 PM EDT
Wow, that is a lot of work! How did you support the crete from inside? What thickness of wood, what type of wood, and how far apart are the posts you used? As you can tell I have been thinking about this recently. [:)] -elliott Thanks for the great info!
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:11:51 PM EDT
That sounds pretty good, man. The company I work for makes pre-fab jail cells, with #4 rebar in a 4 inch grid, pre-insulated, with plumbing and bunks already installed. I'd love to have one of 'em sunk into the ground, but they moved all the forms to the Georgia plant, and I'd have to pay for the shipping. I could get a "culled" one for like $1, though.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:20:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By elliott: Wow, that is a lot of work! How did you support the crete from inside? What thickness of wood, what type of wood, and how far apart are the posts you used? As you can tell I have been thinking about this recently. [:)]
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I placed 3/4" plywood on top of the concrete walls (remember the 3'6" inside dimension? Plywood sheets are 4' by 8' so the sheet overlapped the side walls by 3" each side and I cut the length down to 6'10" to overlap each end wall by 3"). I had five 2x6s bracing the center of the plywood. I took 2x12s and shot them into the walls after setting the cap height correctly. #4 rebar was used.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:21:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin: ... I fabricated the door system and frame out of steel and set it in the forms before pouring the concrete. I could tell you how the door system works, but then I'd have to kill you.
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So what did you do with the Ready-mix truck after you covered the driver up? [;)]
... I have to get a little heater or something to cook off the moisture.
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You're going to keep it in there, I suppose. Do you seal the concrete in an enclosure like this? It seems like on the one hand, a lot of moisture could get in, and on the other hand, you don't want to trap it there, either
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:33:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By prk:
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin: ... I fabricated the door system and frame out of steel and set it in the forms before pouring the concrete. I could tell you how the door system works, but then I'd have to kill you.
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So what did you do with the Ready-mix truck after you covered the driver up? [;)]
... I have to get a little heater or something to cook off the moisture.
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You're going to keep it in there, I suppose. Do you seal the concrete in an enclosure like this? It seems like on the one hand, a lot of moisture could get in, and on the other hand, you don't want to trap it there, either
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PRK- With the forms up and me shovelling the crete up and over said 6' high forms, unless you are superman with X-Ray vision, you aren't going to see squat. When I poured the cap a few days later, the door system was conspicuously absent, only the door frame was visible. Yes, the door "system" is totally removable while the frame remains poured right into the walls. Yes, I will need a permanent heater in the space. I just called my buddy and he says sometime later this week he will come over and take dig pics for y'all. He'd come over sooner, but is leaving for Atlanta and won't be back 'till mid-week.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 2:38:33 PM EDT
BTW, my standard response for those who are outside the circle of responsible friends is "I'm building a root cellar." Perhaps I can locate someone else who can post pics sooner than mid-to-late week.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 3:12:50 PM EDT
That sounds great. My wife is a Realtor and has a builder that she represents who puts reinforced concrete rooms in the basement as a standard feature. It really is a huge selling point for most as it can be used as a "panic room" or as a vault. Steel door frame built in as well. The average room size he makes are 10'x15'. I thought it was a great idea...
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 3:20:58 PM EDT
Man that sounds great, I was wondering about concrete and moisture, would painting the inside walls help any?
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 3:25:54 PM EDT
How long would someone have to fill a 6 or 8" thick wall before it started screwing up by taking too long? -elliott
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 3:26:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Zardoz: That sounds pretty good, man. The company I work for makes pre-fab jail cells, with #4 rebar in a 4 inch grid, pre-insulated, with plumbing and bunks already installed. I'd love to have one of 'em sunk into the ground, but they moved all the forms to the Georgia plant, and I'd have to pay for the shipping. I could get a "culled" one for like $1, though.
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pics? website? info more info!!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 11:47:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By elliott: How long would someone have to fill a 6 or 8" thick wall before it started screwing up by taking too long?
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It took me and my dad 45 minutes to fill the two walls up to the 6' height.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 11:48:46 AM EDT
Garandman is getting some pics through snail-mail. Let's see if he can scan them and then post them. He should get the photos today or tomorrow.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:31:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:37:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Wobblin-Goblin:
Originally Posted By Jarhead_22: Pics?
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I do have regular photos of the bunker taken during the whole process, but no digital pics. There is a possibility a buddy of mine can post some pics (he has a dig camera).
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could you include a floorplan so we can see how it functions.[;D]
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:44:21 PM EDT
Well I don't have the luxury of a basement, but my gun room is part of my workshop. Workshop is 38 x 26 concrete block construction on a 6" slab, 12' tall walls with truss, plywood, shingle roof. Gun room is 10 x 10 poured solid walls with rebar in every cell, 6" thick poured ceiling with rebar reinforcement. Mini-split self contained AC system, walls were dryloc'd for vapor barrier. Currently has a standard steel prehung that opens into the room - working on a vault door that attaches to a steel frame that was attached during the concreate pouring. Can anyone tell that the original owner was a brick mason? Ryan
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:50:21 PM EDT
When u said Bunker, I figured you made enough room for all of us??
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 6:01:00 PM EDT
The most important part of any Vault or bunker is of course the DOOR! And it just so happens that I am a contractor and have a door that would be anyone's dream door. It is a Diebold Titan series vault door and frame. It measures 6'6" x 3'10" by 8" thick. The door is secured by a full-height, stainless steel-clad locking bar that engages both vertical jambs and also has a three-movement, 144 hour manual time lock if needed. The weight of this door is approximately 7500lb. This door sells for over $18,000 new and I will sell it for $3500.00.(if you would like to get a idea of what it looks like go to www.diebold.com and do a search for vaults and look at the "Titan"} You could not buy this door from Diebold because I was told that it is not sold to the general public. The only reason that I am selling it is because I already have one in my home. Serious inquires only!! (207)465-2497 leave a message because all calls are screened.
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 4:53:09 AM EDT
The weight of this door is approximately 7500lb.
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Is that a typo? I don't see how you could move something that heavy into your house.
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 4:20:20 PM EDT
No typo it's 7500. You have to remember that no matter how thick your vault walls are, and no matter how much rebar you use if your door won't hold up it's no good. As for moving it, it just takes time and the right dolly's ect..I sure if you went to your local rental store they could help you out with moving it around. The nice thing about this door is it is already framed so all you have to do is set it, and just make sure it is somewhat level. This is the same type of door that banks use. It also has some type of mechanism that if it is drilled or heat is put to it, it detects that, and drops some kind od secondary locking system. This door is ideal for someone who wants the best and wants to be the envy of all his friends.
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 7:33:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2002 7:37:02 PM EDT by bulldog1967]
Originally Posted By Parabellum: No typo it's 7500. You have to remember that no matter how thick your vault walls are, and no matter how much rebar you use if your door won't hold up it's no good. As for moving it, it just takes time and the right dolly's ect..I sure if you went to your local rental store they could help you out with moving it around. The nice thing about this door is it is already framed so all you have to do is set it, and just make sure it is somewhat level. This is the same type of door that banks use. It also has some type of mechanism that if it is drilled or heat is put to it, it detects that, and drops some kind od secondary locking system. This door is ideal for someone who wants the best and wants to be the envy of all his friends.
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[img]http://www.diebold.com/oppssol/images/titanvaultdoor_b.jpg[/img] NICE! If I had a place to put it I'd be buying it from you! Bulldog OUT
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 9:50:35 PM EDT
pics? website? info more info!!!!!!
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[url]http://www.tindallconcrete.com/[/url]
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 10:21:44 PM EDT
Can I sell you a "Tin Hat" rack? Just kidding!!!!!
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