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Posted: 3/3/2002 5:35:11 AM EDT
I found that the chainsaw will win every time. Saturday morning I was being the good husband when the wife asked me to cut some branches (about 25 feet up) from the oak tree in the front yard. One branch in particular was over a lamp post, so I didn't want the branch to drop on it and break it. I was doing fine until I got to the base of the branch. I thought I would cut it to a point where it was about to fall and push it away with my hands. Yeah, right. As the branch was falling, I moved the chainsaw to my left hand while attempting to push the branch with my right. Did I mention that the chainsaw blade was still moving? I ran my right hand straight across the moving blade, cutting deep into the area between the palm and the base of the thumb (The branch did miss the light post, however). After yelling, 'Oh, shit!!!', I climbed down the ladder (still holding the chainsaw). There was so much blood! Hosed off my hand to see the damage, but it wouldn't stop bleeding. Went to the ER, where they assessed the damage. Luckily no tendons or nerves cut, but it still hurt like hell. 7 or 8 stitches later, I was out. Still hurts like hell, though. Worse yet, I still had to finish what I was doing. Couldn't sleep last because of the pain, and I'm flying out to Wisconsin today. I can't even do some of the basic things for myself. You don't realize how important the thumb is til you don't have the use of one. Won't be able to ride the bike for about a week. That's what really sucks. Anyway, that's my story for today.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 5:41:25 AM EDT
At least you've still got a thumb! It would have been awful easy for that saw to take it the rest of the way off. I hope it gets well soon and booze for the pain usually works for me.....[:)]
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 5:42:26 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 5:45:23 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ponyboy: At least you've still got a thumb! It would have been awful easy for that saw to take it the rest of the way off. I hope it gets well soon and booze for the pain usually works for me.....[:)]
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You're right. Since I was up half the night, I couldn't help but think about what I could have lost. My wife thought she saw my whole hand fall to the ground. Actually, the worst thing was that my kids were out there and witnessed it. Scared the hell out of them. As for the booze, too bad I don't drink, or I probably would be wasted by now.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 5:47:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Paul: Ouch! Cut right though your leather gloves eh? Good thing you didn't lose that thumb. Next time tie the branch to a higher one, put it under tension so that it doesn't fall or swing at you and have at it. That wife wants her good husband alive. Three weeks ago my brother was cutting a sheet of plywood in his basement and fell onto the spinning table saw of death. The blade went clear though the meat between his wrist and elbow stopping only after chipping the bone. Cut all the nerves, tendons and blood supply except for a few. Eight hours and over $15,000 later of micro surgery the arm was saved. And no insurance coverage. Be careful people.
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Gloves? Oh, yeah, those things. Oops. And as for the rope trick, I use it all the time. But this time there wasn't a branch available. Glad your brother's OK. Makes mine look a papercut.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:42:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/3/2002 7:43:25 AM EDT by prk]
Originally Posted By Paul: Three weeks ago my brother was cutting a sheet of plywood in his basement and fell onto the spinning table saw of death. The blade went clear though the meat between his wrist and elbow stopping only after chipping the bone. Cut all the nerves, tendons and blood supply except for a few. Eight hours and over $15,000 later of micro surgery the arm was saved. And no insurance coverage. Be careful people.
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My old high school shop teacher, who was always reminding us of safety, was cutting a piece on the table saw in his basement. He told us later he knew he should have been using a push stick. Anyway, he hit a knot in the wood and it somehow cut off all of one and most of two digits. That made a big impression on me - if it could happen to him, it could happen to anyone.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:49:40 AM EDT
I don't suppose you feel that lucky, but your are. A fellow I met was recovering from a fall that occurred when in his rush to finish some lunch-time trimming for a friend, he cut on the wrong side of a rope he'd tied to a branch for safety. The branch fell a few feet, and then pulled him out of the tree. Since he'd already done a mess of cutting, what he fell on was a pile of other wood laying on the ground. Fortunately, though he broke and tore a lot, he came out OK, after close to $200K in medical care.
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 8:07:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 12:18:09 PM EDT
Damn.....already been said, but you are one lucky man!
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 5:59:19 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 6:13:16 PM EDT
That movie ROCKS!!! Count yourself as one VERY lucky man. That chainsaw only nipped you as a gentle warning. They RARELY do that. I'm a "highly skilled woodworker". I make guitars from scratch as one of my hobbies. I have learned that to stay in one piece, you MUST force yourself to be paranoid about safety around sharp tools and especially power tools. I learned that early, and have never been bitten by a power tool and only nipped lightly by hand tools. I'm also an expert at sharpening all kinds of tools correctly, from cold chisels to wood chisels to Japanese swords (Substantial investment in special stones, books, individual instruction by a master) to straight razors. I keep my wood chisels so sharp that they can be used to shave and you won't feel any hair being pulled. I treat them all like the deadly weapons they are and follow the rules of FIREARMS safety with them. Assume they're always loaded (sharp) and will destroy (cut) anything they're pointed at. Jobs that require a chainsaw I handle by picking up the phone and calling a pro. Balancing on a ladder while holding a chainsaw in one hand and pushing branches away with the other, and trying to keep them all from intersecting, is NOT a game I am willing to play! Interesting link here. Check it out. Amazing, really. [url]www.sawstop.com[/url] CJ
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 6:53:22 PM EDT
I made an "error in judgement" with a chainsaw when I was about 16. As I was way back in the hills, I couldn't get to a hospital. To this day my leg can tell a change in barometric pressure. BE CAREFUL!! SRM
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:02:22 PM EDT
Being a good husband??? Being a good husband would be supporting the latter while your woman was up cutting the tree!! LOL... Hope she at least made you a meal..
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:10:50 PM EDT
Best wishes for a speedy recovery. I've been running saws in the woods for a long time and still have to remind myself "eye protection, ear protection, gloves, chaps" all the time, even on the simplest cuts. Take care and get well. You don't drink, but maybe some good prescription pain pills....
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:38:03 PM EDT
Geez, MC_Man, that made "Da Boys" head for cover just reading about it![shock] Could have been a LOT worse. Hope you heal soon. coyote3
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 7:52:44 PM EDT
Sorry you almost cut your hand off. Man that must suck. Please get well soon! It wasn't your trigger hand was it? this story reminded me of a weird game I found [url]http://www.chainsawwarrior.com[/url] Again, don't mess it up any worse and get well soon!
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 10:46:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 11:44:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/3/2002 11:45:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:36:15 AM EDT
I did something similar once. ONCE! Tell us the truth, did the pain about 15 seconds after the chain sunk into your hand hurt more? Or knowing you did a completely god damned stupid thing now hurt more? For me it was the later. Good luck in your recovery. I mean it.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 12:58:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/4/2002 1:01:45 AM EDT by Confederate]
Originally Posted By Paul: Ouch! Cut right though your leather gloves eh? Good thing you didn't lose that thumb. Next time tie the branch to a higher one, put it under tension so that it doesn't fall or swing at you and have at it. That wife wants her good husband alive. Three weeks ago my brother was cutting a sheet of plywood in his basement and fell onto the spinning table saw of death. The blade went clear though the meat between his wrist and elbow stopping only after chipping the bone. Cut all the nerves, tendons and blood supply except for a few. Eight hours and over $15,000 later of micro surgery the arm was saved. And no insurance coverage. Be careful people.
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Gloves? You've got to be kidding, gloves will do nothing to protect you from a running chainsaw. A good coating of whipped cream will offer you the same protection as leather gloves. Glad you got through it with only minor injuries
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 10:01:01 AM EDT
I run a Stihl 017 once or twice a week. I've yet to cut anything other than the tree, but I'm sure my time is coming. Keep the blade sharp and always read the saftey instructions. Hope your wounds heal clean and fast.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 10:20:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/4/2002 10:22:34 AM EDT by lurker]
i tangled with a table saw last year just before xmas. left hand. i still have all my fingers, (though theyre not all fully functional) so i got off easy. my exit criteria for physical therapy was to be able to shoot my 1911 left handed without dropping it, took about 4 months. table saw 1, hand 0 motorcycle 1, leg 0 i'm hoping not to get into it with my guns. always know where all your fingers are, or you might lose them. do [b]not[/b] use power tools when youre tired.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 10:36:19 AM EDT
If you didn't see it already, check it out: [url]www.sawstop.com[/url] Quite a fine safety design for power tools. I'll bet it can even be adapted to chainsaws. In fact, I'm sure it will be before too long, if it's not already available. Basic rule of woodworking, number one: Know where the blade is going, and keep all of your anatomy out of the blade's path. Rule two: Assume the blade will bind and throw the workpiece, AND the machine will move from the backlash. Keep your anatomy out of the possible paths of the tool and the work. Rule three: Count fingers and every other body part you like to have. Make your cut on your workpiece, and recount fingers, etc. If the inventory is the same, continue working. If something changed, find out where the missing part is, recover it, and call an ambulance. Take remedial action while waiting for them. Don't continue working. Rule four: No unwanted or untrained spectators when working with power tools. NONE. The LAST thing you need is to be startled by somebody behind you when you're feeding a 1x2 to a bandsaw. You'll be picking your fingers out of the mechanism. I prefer to lock the garage/workshop and hang 'DO NOT DISTURB UNDER PENALTY OF DEATH' signs on the garage's window to the house. I give instructions that nobody is to approach me or even call to me when I have any electric tool operating. And NEVER approach from an angle I can't see you at. CJ
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 10:50:55 AM EDT
Look at the bright side, you're still able to wipe your own a$$.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 1:27:42 PM EDT
I've owned several chainsaws over the years, and (knock on wood) the only serious thing I'v had happed is to knick the toe of my boots a couple of times. They are a MERCILESS machine, and people give me a weird look when I say that I consider chainsaws far more dangerous than handguns.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 1:40:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By platform389:
Gloves? Oh, yeah, those things.
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Yeah, those things. Preferably double palm and not the super cheapie types. Chainsaws take no prisoners. [IMG]http://216.40.201.155/s/cwm/3dlil/ugh.gif[/IMG] Edited to add link: [url]http://www.memphisglove.com/big-jake-kevlar.html#item3[/url]
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 1:41:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/4/2002 1:45:25 PM EDT by DVDTracker]
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 4:40:31 PM EDT
That's nothing. I was using a post-hole digger last year and as I rammed it towards the ground, I hit my foot with it and chopped 3 toes off.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 5:42:07 PM EDT
Chaps,and a lot of other logging safety items are made of,believe it or not,kevlar or ballistic nylon. They will stop a saw chain cold in less than half a second,but they wont do any good at all when they are thrown over the tailgate of your truck.Believe me,I know. Left leg,just under knee cap,272husky with a 20"bar.Lots of stitches,lots of pain. They say, he who hesitates is lost,but I say "He who hurries with a chainsaw is an IDIOT."
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 6:25:54 PM EDT
[chainsawkill] Sorry, I'm suprised that somebody didn't beat me to it. [chainsawkill] [chainsaw]
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 6:32:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ShootinShane: That's nothing. I was using a post-hole digger last year and as I rammed it towards the ground, I hit my foot with it and chopped 3 toes off.
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Someone was supposed to ask me "What did ya do then?" And I would have said "I called a tow truck." (toe truck) HA, HA. This is not a true story.
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 7:47:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 8:38:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/4/2002 8:38:50 PM EDT by cmjohnson]
Lawnmowers...eek! I remember a story that appeared in the paper about a young mother who was riding a tractor, pulling a bush hog (large lawn mowing attachment) and she had her baby with her on the tractor. The kid fell off and she couldn't stop in time. Results were as bad as you could imagine. Bush hogs don't leave much but mulch. Your imagination may fill in the details if you wish. Moral of the story: Leave the kid inside. No silly icons will do it on this one, thanks. CJ
Link Posted: 3/4/2002 10:53:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ShootinShane:
Originally Posted By ShootinShane: That's nothing. I was using a post-hole digger last year and as I rammed it towards the ground, I hit my foot with it and chopped 3 toes off.
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Someone was supposed to ask me "What did ya do then?" And I would have said "I called a tow truck." (toe truck) HA, HA. This is not a true story.
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This one?? [img]http://www.leconsulting.com/arthurhu/screen/toetru15.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 12:05:11 AM EDT
LMAO! That is beautiful.
Link Posted: 3/5/2002 12:51:30 AM EDT
NICE STORIES THE TRUE ONES AND NOT SO TRUE. LESSON ONE SAFETY BEGINS AND ENDS WITH NO.1 LESSON TWO SAFETY BEGINS AND ENDS WITH NO.1 LESSON THREE etc. As a arborist here in alaska i see alot of silly accidents. Like that other member, call a pro but even pro's mess up.Had job one day to do this 12inch house tree so i thought hey i will go do it and still get to my daughter play, so got to job site at this house and forgot my work boots"steel toed" so i just used my dress boots wolvervine"durashocks steel toe" and got with job easly record time.So the owner comes out to talk while i'm taking off safety equipment "chaps helmet etc." and ask if i can get this branch that he reconsidered, so i say yea. fire backup chainsaw without chaps but with ear helmet.Started cutting branch"then thinking about my daughter forget about what i was doing and nicked my dress boot horrible gash on them. "but finished job got to the play and after wards was in lobby with other parents where all could see my boot.[:I] lessons learned don't wear boots daughter and wife bought for b-day to do work. WILL NEVER LET U FORGET p.s.but no blood great thing hope u others recover quickly
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