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Posted: 1/17/2002 12:37:03 PM EDT
Guys, I am tired of doing computer stuff. Its ok, but I dont see myself in it for more than 5 more years. At least being a tech. More and more, I am thinking about becoming a lawyer, or getting my series 7. What should I know about it? What tests do I need to take for getting into law school? I think wanting to fight the anti's using their tatics is part of it. Also stopping the JBT's in court too. Also, I like to B.S. Any help? c-rock
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 12:44:24 PM EDT
All I have to say is, we need as many pro-gun conservative lawyers as we can get in this country. hehe GO FOR IT! I think you will have to have an undergrad and take the LSAT. Check out [url]www.monster.com[/url] for help.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 12:44:45 PM EDT
Alright. But, come The Revolution, don't think you're gonna get any special favor over all the other lawyers we toss on the bonfire.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 12:46:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2002 12:47:30 PM EDT by Crappybob]
C-rock I too and boared with the IT field. it sucks for the long term and I am getting in on it while the pay is going down. along with the demand. I am thinking of taking up policital science. And running for some local offices at first then moving on up the ladder. I don't know what party I would run with though. Edited to say, go for it.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 12:47:17 PM EDT
My little brother got his series 7 and is making bank working at Vanguard.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 1:06:12 PM EDT
Find yourself a nice private conservative Law School..."And never ever let them know what your thinking"
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 1:06:32 PM EDT
You need a college degree- I assume you have that. Next you need to take the LSAT. Once you sign up for the LSAT and LSDAS (they help you with the application process, law school admission information, etc), then you take a prep course (follow it religiously). Once you take the exam and get your scores, you begin the application process. Take it one step at a time and focus on what you are doing. Before you know it, you'll be a 1L logging 100 pages a night! To sign up for the LSAT and LSDAS and to get info on prep courses, go to [URL]www.lsac.org/ [/URL]. PS: Go to med school!
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 1:14:29 PM EDT
C-Rock, go see your particular state's Bar Association website. You might start at the "American Bar Association (ABA)" site. I'm sure all of the requirements will be listed. I'm only on the AR15 site so frequently because I'm "studying" for the California bar. It is one bad mamma jamma of a test. Good luck. Hope you have patience. On the bright side, the law school women tend to be a bit on the wild side. They act like they're back in high school or something. PS, Hello, Steve from VA! Hope all is going well for you.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 1:33:52 PM EDT
I left journalism for law and haven't looked back. Yeah I know wiseguys, the only professions I am missing for bottom-of-the-barrel are politician and used car salesman. "And my mom thinks I play piano in a whorehouse." If you get in, three words that are key to success: Emanuel's, Gilbert's, and flashcards.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 4:13:32 PM EDT
If you get in, three words that are key to success: Emanuel's, Gilbert's, and flashcards.
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Heh heh...also: Roadmaps, Examples & Explanations, and BARBRI videos. And all the outlines from older students you can lay your hands on. As a current 2L, I can tell you it's not as bad as people will tell you. I have a lot of work, but it's not from classes. I'm one of those masochists that's on two law reviews and I'm an RA for a professor. Sleep is a precious commodity sometimes.
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 4:18:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
If you get in, three words that are key to success: Emanuel's, Gilbert's, and flashcards.
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Heh heh...also: Roadmaps, Examples & Explanations, and BARBRI videos. And all the outlines from older students you can lay your hands on. As a current 2L, I can tell you it's not as bad as people will tell you. I have a lot of work, but it's not from classes. I'm one of those masochists that's on two law reviews and I'm an RA for a professor. Sleep is a precious commodity sometimes.
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Shouldn't you be writing some outlines or something?
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 6:40:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Avtomat:
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
If you get in, three words that are key to success: Emanuel's, Gilbert's, and flashcards.
View Quote
Heh heh...also: Roadmaps, Examples & Explanations, and BARBRI videos. And all the outlines from older students you can lay your hands on. As a current 2L, I can tell you it's not as bad as people will tell you. I have a lot of work, but it's not from classes. I'm one of those masochists that's on two law reviews and I'm an RA for a professor. Sleep is a precious commodity sometimes.
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Shouldn't you be writing some outlines or something?
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There is no substitute for going to class. Learn it the first time, while it is being taught. Of course, this requires you to do all the reading. Or do what I did and marry the BARBRI rep. [:D]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 7:00:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Avtomat: Shouldn't you be writing some outlines or something?
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I do write my own outlines. It's an excellent way to learn/review/study. HOWEVER, in making my outlines, I use both commercial outlines and those of other students to flesh mine out. I don't copy them verbatim, I just use them to get different ideas and perspectives and to make sure I don't miss anything. It's common practice. Everyone (that does well) does it, and it's not cheating or unethical by any means. kikomax- Class is usually very valuable, more to understand the Prof's perspective and pet issues than to learn the law. I learned a long time ago that how much law you know has little to do with your exam performance. It's all about how precisely and quickly you can think, apply, and write under time pressure. In a way, the law school exam system creates the wrong behavior if the true goal is to learn law. Oh, and my BARBRI rep is SMOKIN! And currently single...
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 7:57:00 AM EDT
I have been thinking about becoming a lawyer
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Yike!....It's SHTF!
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 8:22:57 AM EDT
Hi CRock: You do the following: (1.) You get a Bachelors Degree from an Accredited 4 Year college. The better the college the better your chances are of getting into a good law school. Also here is a little tip: Most Admission officers in law schools are very sick and tired of seeing that the bulk of their applicants having Political Science, English Lit, Sociology or Pschology Degrees. They get excited when they get an applicant who has a Science or Engineering Degree. (2.) Apply only to accredited Law Schools, Apply to many as you can because you will get rejected from a lot of schools. (3.) Law School lasts for 3 years. In your 3rd year of law school you specialize in the type of law you will be practicing. Now, there is one area of law that is very lucrative , but most law school students are NOT qualified to specialize in. That is Patent Law. To specialize in Patent Law, law schools require that the law student had earned a BS or MS in a Science or Engineering Discipline. Since most law school students do NOT have this background, the supply of Patent Lawyers is low. But the demand for patent lawyers is very high. So..getting good pay, and finding a job as an in house Patent Lawyer (In-House is where you are working for a particular company), is pretty easy. Another good area of Law to specialize in is Tax Law, and Contract Law. Criminal and Constitutional Law are fun but you'll have trouble paying your mortgage. (5.) Once you've graduated, you will have your JD (Judicial Doctorate). And you will have to study for the BAR. This will take about 6 months of solid studying everyday. You really want to concentrate on Fundamentals: Constitutional Law, Court Proceedings, etc. (6.) Once you pass: you will then be fingerprinted and sworn in. The FBI will keep a record of your finger prints and run a background check on you. If clear, you will then get your license and you can then practice law in the Local and State Courts. To practice law in Federal Courts requires that you have been practicing law for a number of years and there is a procedure for being admitted to the Federal Bar. Oh yeah, when you represent clients, frequently a percentage of your clients will NOT pay you the money that they owe you in fees (either because they can't or because maybe they do have the money but they are jerks) so you can always expect to incur some losses.
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 8:41:09 AM EDT
Lawyers generally have very low work/life satisfaction. Many people go to law school thinking they will do something other than be an attorney. However, they get out of school and find that those "other" options are really limited, and they end up as unhappy (and therefore margianally successful) lawyers. I have too many friends who would rather being doing something else, but the only other thing they are qualified to do is flip burgers. And McDonalds does not pay $200/hr, so it is not much of a decision. Not all lawyers hate their job. Some are born for the law, and would be good for nothing else. Others work in a field that interests them, and seem to enjoy it. The average income of lawyers is very good, I think better than doctors now, but there is great income disparity. While the average lawyer might make $100,000, it seems like that breaks down into 12 guys making $30,000 and one guy making $1,000,000. The LSAT is very important for getting into a good school. The quality of the school you go to and whether you are on law review will determine the pay of your first job, and will have a big impact on how much you will make in the future. Take both the LSAT and law review very seriously. Of course, there are plenty of scrappy lawyers who do well, bombed the LSAT and slept through law school, but why not start with a leg up? I'd only advise you to do it if there is some specific area of the law that you are interested in - and there is enough business in that area to make a living. I doubt you are going to make it trying second amendment cases. There is probably not enough work, and the people the cops go after generally have no money. If you end up practicing in an area of the law that you are not passionate about, you are going to be back in the same situation you are in right now. Look carefully before you leap.
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 4:41:30 PM EDT
i just took the lsat and have one semester of undergrad to go. i got my ass kicked on it and scored a 148. for you in the know, should i take it again? am i dead in the water? and i would advise those of you who are going to take it, if you hate tests and have a hard time figuring out: if a,b,c,d,e,f are at a recital and a goes before d so when does t go?, then dont prepare as hard as you can for it, prepare harder than you can. but others have no problem with this test, wish i was one of em.
Link Posted: 1/19/2002 5:57:56 AM EDT
C-Rock join our group, Concealcarry, Inc in IL. John Birch is a 2nd Year law student. I kind of like it too. In the interm, I might consider paralegal work.
Link Posted: 1/19/2002 6:41:03 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Pompey: i just took the lsat and have one semester of undergrad to go. i got my ass kicked on it and scored a 148. for you in the know, should i take it again? am i dead in the water? and i would advise those of you who are going to take it, if you hate tests and have a hard time figuring out: if a,b,c,d,e,f are at a recital and a goes before d so when does t go?, then dont prepare as hard as you can for it, prepare harder than you can. but others have no problem with this test, wish i was one of em.
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I know a guy who took it three times. I practiced/studied for the LSAT for over a year. may grade never changed. my score was less than ten points higher than yours. My undergrad gpa was pretty high, and I was still able to get into a first tier school. I graduated in the top quarter. point is: bustin your ass can make up for a poor lsat score.
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