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Posted: 1/15/2002 4:24:46 PM EDT
Hey guys, I am looking for a beefy, medium chili recipe. Rich in stock and ingredients, but not too hot. If ya got one please post it. BTW, This pepper recipe is really low fat. The only fat is from the ground beef if you get fat free beef broth. There is a variation for ground turkey. Let me know if your interested in it (it involves pre cooking the meat in a combination of spices to beef it up). I know this is a gun forum, and I've thought about trying to keep an AR in the photos all the time, but I always seem to be in a hurry around picture time. [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid28/p3a44ed360d34aac11557b244d7c67098/fdfefed3.jpg.orig.jpg[/img] [b]Stuffed Peppers[/b] 8 Large Green Peppers [u]Stuffing[/u] 2 Cups cooked white rice 1.5 Lbs lean ground beef 1 Medium onion, chopped ½ Head cabbage (the top half, chopped) 3 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce 1 Tsp garlic powder ¼ Cup parsley ½ Tsp ground oregano ½ Tsp salt ½ Tsp pepper 1 Can Campbell’s beef broth 1 Can Spaghetti sauce 2 Cans Campbell’s beef broth (for a total of 3 in recipe) Arrange the uncut peppers in your deep baking pan to see how they fit. If all 8 fit snug, just cut the tops off and hollow them out. If there is room for a few more peppers, just cut enough of your largest ones in half so that you have enough peppers to fit tight, then hollow them out. If you end up doing that, cut the stem out of the top half: you will have a hole, but it doesn’t affect anything. Combine the stuffing ingredients in a large bowl. You really have to mix it well to distribute the meat evenly through the cabbage and rice. Stuff the peppers with the stuffing. Once the peppers are stuffed, pour one can of beef broth over the tops of the peppers slowly; you want it to soak in. Pour the last can of broth into the bottom of the pan, followed up by two cans of water. Spoon the spaghetti sauce over the tops of the peppers. Cover and cook at 325 for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Serve with the broth from the bottom of the pan. [b]Don't[/b] overcook this dish. The pepper skins will separate from the pepper meat, and that is unappealing. If you have an unbalanced or odd oven, spin it around every 20 minutes. This is a pic of the peppers ready to be filled... [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid28/p1e220c351a641f591c7bf0b41f491b62/fdfeff28.jpg.orig.jpg[/img] This is a pic of them stuffed, with half of them topped... [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid28/p88c1c302b548954e0098df4443d72786/fdfefef9.jpg.orig.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 1/15/2002 5:32:56 PM EDT
Dad nab it, you guys seem like [b]THE[/b] Chili goto guys. Cmon :-)
Link Posted: 1/15/2002 6:20:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ozzie223: Dad nab it, you guys seem like [b]THE[/b] Chili goto guys. Cmon :-)
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OK Oz-man. You asked for it, here it is. This is The Real Deal. Chile Colorado 20 large dried chile pods (Anaheim, New Mexico, Guajillo or similar) 3 lbs beef round, cut into chunks 2-3 large onions, cut up 2-20 cloves garlic, to taste Salt, pepper, comino (cumin), also to taste. Break the stems off the dried chiles and remove seeds. The seeds will make it hotter if you leave them in. Cover the dried chile pods with very hot water and allow them to soak for at least 2 hours til soft, or overnight. Put the softened chile pods in a blender with enough of the soaking water to cover, then blend until smooth, adding water until you get the consistency you like. Don't worry about too much or too little water at this point, you can add water or cook it off later. For a smoother sauce, you can strain the chile colorado sauce through a strainer to remove the skins. It will be a beautiful brick red color with a bright chili flavor, and not too hot. In a large pot or dutch oven, heat some oil or bacon grease, then add beef chunks and saute until well browned. Add onions and saute with meat til soft and golden brown. Add garlic and continue to saute. Don't let the garlic burn. Add the prepared chile colorado, bring all to a boil, then lower to simmer, cover and let cook until the meat is very tender. The onions will sort of dissolve into the chile colorado, making a thick, rich gravy. Add water, beef stock or beer as you cook until you get the consistency you like. Check for heat and add salt, pepper and cumin powder to your taste. Serve this with whatever you like to eat and drink with chili. You can vary the heat by the type of chile pods you use, and whether you leave the seeds in or not. Notice that there is not a bean or tomato anywhere near this recipe! Real chile doesn't need or want any of these adulterants. Keep them far away, and your friends will be [b]very[/b] impressed! You will accquire new status as the Chile God of your block. Enjoy.
Link Posted: 1/15/2002 7:15:59 PM EDT
Cerberus: yer chili is very close to mine but I use venison when I have it and also a tad of mexican oregano. I also add fresh roasted green chiles and a little chipotle for fire. [flame] A little tune I heard once at a chili cook-off had the line: "If you knew beans about chili, you'd know chili has no beans!" Damn skippy! [beer]
Link Posted: 1/15/2002 9:20:23 PM EDT
OK! Thanks :-) I heading to the commissary tommorow to check on chili pods (never cooked with them). I'm going to try both recipes if I can find the ingredients. If the commissary has their usual "120 boxes of chex for 19.95$" and no chili pods I'll have to wait and head downtown to Rapid City where I'm sure they will have it. The El Mexicano seasoning and chili pods are the only things I think I have not seen. I'll post pics from the gastrointestinal front lines once I aquire the items:-). I made cheddar cheese soup tonight, I'll get that up tomorrow. Thanks! The only family recipe for chili I have had had like 5 lbs of ground beef, 5 lbs of tomatos and multiple cans of Navy beans in it. You know Polish cooks, if you can't fry it or put it in a cabbage leaf they have no clue what your talking about.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 3:28:45 AM EDT
Chili Con Beer 1 Can Cattle-Ranch chili. 6 Cans cold beer. 1 Lazy-boy recliner. Open can of chili. Sit in recliner. Eat chili and drink beer.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 3:32:26 AM EDT
Kip's "Bad Boy" Chili This is my adaptation of a recipe by Kit Anderson on the BBQ List. I've tried a lot of chili recipes . . . this is the best, so far! 3 pounds - ground beef, 15/75 blend 4 or 5 - pork chops 8 - tablespoons vegetable oil, divided 2 cups - chopped onion 3 tablespoons - finely chopped garlic 4 to 5 tablespoons - Chile powder, best quality available 1 teaspoon - oregano, dried 1 teaspoon - cumin, ground 1 28 oz. can - tomatoes, crushed 6 to 8 - jalapeno chilies; *see prep. instructions below 4 cubes - beef bouillon 2 or 3 bottles - good beer, Killian Red is a good choice 1 teaspoon - salt 1/2 teaspoon - pepper, or to taste 1/4 cup - bourbon; this just happened! 1/4 cup - coffee, strong & black 1 square - chocolate, bitter, baker's type Beans of some kind; pinto, kidney or black; I mix black & kidney Pat the ground beef dry with paper towels. Cut the pork chop meat from the bone and cube into 3/4" pieces. In a large, heavy skillet, and in 1/4 of the vegetable oil, brown the meat in three separate lots; 1 1/2 pounds at a time and then, lastly, brown the pork cubes. With a slotted spoon transfer the browned meat to your favorite chili pot and set aside. In the skillet, add the last 2 oz. of oil and saute the onion and the garlic until just translucent, using low heat so as not to burn. Remove from heat and add to the skillet the Chile powder, oregano and cumin. Also add the green chiles; see below for how to prepare them. Stir until well mixed and then add the crushed tomatoes and the bouillon cubes. Stir once again and pour this into the chili pot with the meat. Add two of the beers, the bourbon and the coffee. Add the salt and pepper and the chocolate. Mix it all together, put it back on the stove and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to very low and simmer, partially covered for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. After about an hour check the consistency of the chili; add more beer to thin it out if necessary. Adjust to your taste. I like the chili fairly thick, not watery. One last thing . . .add the (fully cooked) beans about a half hour before serving. Don't cook the beans in the chili. * Chile pepper preparation: With a propane torch scorch the skin of each of the Chile peppers. The skin will turn black and blister. Burn the hell out of it. Allow to cook and remove and discard the membrane and seeds. Warning; don't put your fingers in your eyes after touching the chiles. I recommend plastic gloves to handle the chiles. Chop very finely and add to the pot. ENJOY! *NOTE: You can substitute dried, crushed red pepper if you don’t want to mess around with the fresh peppers. One tablespoon for medium heat. I don't care what anybody (Texans) says. I say, "It ain't chili if it ain't got beans!"
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 3:33:14 AM EDT
Regardless of the recipe, instead of using plain ground beef, get yourself a whole tenderloin and have it ground fine. Boil it in your favorite beer and do not drain. The meat stock is much thicker and filled with beef.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 3:34:45 AM EDT
Stuffed Peppers A favorite of mine and the best recipe that I have run across for stuffed sweet green or red peppers. 6 large - green or red peppers 1 1/2 pound - ground beef 1/3 cup - onions, finely chopped 2 cloves - garlic, finely chopped or mashed 1 16 oz. can - canned stewed tomatoes 2 tablespoons - Worcestershire sauce 1 cup - sharp cheddar cheese, finely shredded 1 tablespoon - cooking oil, or olive oil 3/4 cup - cooked white rice salt and pepper to taste Cook rice, 2 parts water to 1 part rice until about 2/3 totally cooked. Fluff up with a fork and set aside to cool. Cut off tops of peppers; remove seeds and white membrane. Parboil peppers in boiling, salted water for about 5 minutes. Drain, spray with cold water to cool and drain again. Sprinkle insides with salt. Refrigerate to further cool. Brown ground beef in cooking oil with onion and chopped garlic. Do not let garlic burn, add it last. Add tomatoes w/juice, rice, Worcestershire sauce and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and simmer until rice is almost tender, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 10 - 15 minutes; add cheese and stir in. Stand peppers upright in a baking dish and stuff with mixture, packing tightly. Bake in a pre-heated 350 degree oven, 45 - 50 minutes, until peppers are tender and tops are brown. Remove from oven and sprinkle cheese to the tops before serving. These peppers freeze very well but the peppers that I want to freeze I stuff and wrap for the freezer without cooking. When ready to eat them, thaw them out in the microwave and then bake them as above.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 4:47:40 PM EDT
SkipperJ wrote...
Kip's "Bad Boy" Chili This is my adaptation of a recipe by Kit Anderson on the BBQ List. I've tried a lot of chili recipes . . . this is the best, so far!
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To be honest, this is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks much. All the things I'm used to in Chili (beans, ground meat, the mystery meat (this time pork,sometimes venison) beans ect. I'm still going to try Cerberus's recipe 'cause it looks "Texas" (no idea why I think that, just does,+ anytime I can't find the ingredients for a recipe I want to make it more) No one so far I've talked to knows what "El Mexicano" spice is, but I'll keep an eye out.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 4:54:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2002 5:08:38 PM EDT by Gloftoe]
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 5:26:28 PM EDT
Thanks for clearing that up Gloftoe :-) I was suspecting there is a larger "chili" issue with Texans. A quiet, raging beast of an arguement dying to poke it's head from the pile of kidney beans and roar it's message. If "Chili" is Texan, than real chili should have no beans. [b]Is[/b] chili Texan? I should add, I've only had it [u]with[/u] beans, never without. BTW ... here is that Cheese Soup recipe I promised. [b]Cheese Soup[/b] 3 Cups Chopped Vegetables (celery and carrots) ¼ Cup Butter 1/3-Cup Flour 1 ½ Tsp Paprika 1 ½ Tsp Dry Mustard 3 Cups Chicken Broth 1-Cup Milk 2-Tsp Worcestershire Sauce 12 Oz. Cheddar Cheese (block is fine, about ¾ a block) 1 Bunch diced green onion (about ¾ cup) [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid28/p53705a73767994fb5e65eb7f07b57922/fdfe45fa.jpg.orig.jpg[/img] Melt the butter in a skillet. Add vegetables and cook for 4 minutes on high to soften them up. Then add the flour, dry mustard and paprika, stirring until a red crumbly flour mixture covers the vegetables, cook about 3 minutes. Add the broth, milk and Worcestershire sauce, stirring constantly on high heat. Add the chopped up cheese (you can use Colby, Mild Cheddar, or a mix of white and yellow to change the flavor to your favorite). Keep cooking on high for about 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Cover, reduce heat to very low, and simmer for 20 minutes. If you used processed cheese the soup will be very smooth and rich. If you used hard cheese the soup will be grainy and thicker. If you used hard cheese, stir a few times in those 20 minutes. When serving, just pour the soup into a bowl with a ladle and sprinkle the green onion on top. I have also seen popcorn used as the garnish.
Link Posted: 1/16/2002 5:30:29 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Gloftoe: [Looks "Texas" to me because there's NO BEANS IN IT! You want chili, make some chili. You want beans, make some beans. CHILI AIN'T GOT NO BEANS! -Gloftoe
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Major Double Amen, Brother Gloftoe! Ramblin' Wreck, thanks for reminding me I forgot the oregano. And Ozzie, if you can't find chile pods, I'll send you some. Just be kind enough to tell this Florida city boy where he might find some prairie dogs in beautiful (when Daschle's not there) SD!
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 6:15:04 PM EDT
Thanks much for the offer Cerberus :-) I have only been to one store so far, and there must be 3 grocery stores within 100 miles, so I'm not done checking yet heh heh. If if [b]IF[/b] you could shoot on base, my freezer would be so full!!!ARGH! There are herds of whitetail, wild turkey groups of 15 or so each, and a WHOLE FIELD of groundhogs here. The groundhogs are so bad, people complain about the road next to the field not being cleaned regularly because so many hogs get hit, the leave a red smear 300 yards long there. The base commander always says " we are aware of the groundhog problem and are working to eliminate it" yada yada yada. They still have a deer kill program in town (Rapid City). If you have a "problem" deer they will send over a hunter to shoot it, the meat going to the local jobless shelter. Any of the tourist hunting areas are also good groundhog area's, as the primary groundhog ingredients is soft earth and water. You have to go to the buttes or plains to be alone while varminting. The few areas I have been to, I would be glad to part with heh (most adjoin federal land I shoot on.)
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 6:30:36 PM EDT
As far as chile is concerned, all I have to add is that some people actually put spagetti noodles in the stuff... but then, I'd rather that than beans...
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 6:44:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jhasz: As far as chile is concerned, all I have to add is that some people actually put spagetti noodles in the stuff... but then, I'd rather that than beans...
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[b]Abomination[/b] Dictionary: abomination \A*bom`i*na"tion\, n. 1. The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; 2. That which is abominable; anything hateful, wicked, or shamefully vile; an object or state that excites disgust and hatred; a hateful or shameful vice; pollution. Bible: disgusting, i.e. filthy; especially idolatrous or (concrete) an idol :- abominable filth (idol, -ation), detestable (thing). Ohio: Cinncinatti Chili with cocoa, cinnamon, spaghetti and other, um, ingredients What [i][b]were[/i][/b] those people thinking???
Link Posted: 1/17/2002 11:12:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2002 10:05:20 PM EDT by DVDTracker]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 1:44:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cerberus:
Originally Posted By jhasz: As far as chile is concerned, all I have to add is that some people actually put spagetti noodles in the stuff... but then, I'd rather that than beans...
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[b]Abomination[/b] Dictionary: abomination \A*bom`i*na"tion\, n. 1. The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; 2. That which is abominable; anything hateful, wicked, or shamefully vile; an object or state that excites disgust and hatred; a hateful or shameful vice; pollution. Bible: disgusting, i.e. filthy; especially idolatrous or (concrete) an idol :- abominable filth (idol, -ation), detestable (thing).
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I did not realize this was a discussion about the clinton's, boxer, fienstien, schumer, et al.[:)]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 2:23:32 AM EDT
DAAAAAAAAAYYYYUUUM DVD! It's a Good thing I'm on dial-up, or that recipe would have taken FOR FREAKIN EVER to load! [:D]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 3:17:58 AM EDT
OK what you guys need to do is FedEx me an example of your best recipe's, I'll eat it and decide who has the best![thinking]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 3:47:21 AM EDT
Waverunner - We report (the recipe), you decide. [:D]
Link Posted: 1/18/2002 3:51:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GWF: I did not realize this was a discussion about the clinton's, boxer, fienstien, schumer, et al.[:)]
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Exposure to these individuals and to really bad imitations/bastardizations of chili have identical physical effects: [rolleyes][rolleyes][puke][whacko] I defense of diversity, you left out the Race Warriors, Jackson, Sharpton, et al...
Link Posted: 1/20/2002 8:37:52 PM EDT
Ok ... DVD tracker, until you learn how to use imaging software, you are banned from my cooking posts. Cmon dude, show a little dial up sense :-P Otherwise, since most guys won't download the thread anymore 'cause it takes 45 miutes, maybe we can make a new one before DVD Tracker posts on it. Otherwise I guess I will have to post a new recipe, on ANOTHER THREAD, as no one on dialup will suffer this ones burden. LOL!!!!! RIP ;-P
Link Posted: 1/20/2002 10:05:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/20/2002 10:18:24 PM EDT
Man cannot live on beer and chili alone. Well, not for very long in confined spaces anyway. So without further ado, here's the most delicious brownie recipe it has ever been my pleasure to prepare: Attorney General John Ashcroft's Very Chocolate Brownies: [URL]http://www.virtualcities.com/ons/mo/gov/mogvja1.htm[/URL]
Link Posted: 1/21/2002 4:23:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2002 4:27:44 AM EDT by BenDover]
Originally Posted By cerberus: Ohio: Cinncinatti Chili with cocoa, cinnamon, spaghetti and other, um, ingredients What [i][b]were[/i][/b] those people thinking???
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Cincinnati Chili is not a Texas chili. Originating with the city's minority Greek population, it is completely different. The chocolate is to mix the oil and grease to keep it from floating on the top. It is not for flavoring and you can't even taste it. There are many chili parlors in Cincinnati and each has its own secret recipe for its own chili. The most popular local chain is Skyline Chili, but there's also Cincinnati Chili, Dixie Chili, Empress Chili, Gold Star Chili and other chains to choose from. The best is still in the neighborhood joints though. [url]http://www.skylinechili.com/[/url] [url]http://www.goldstarchili.com/[/url] The way it's served is different, as well. Cincinnati chili is traditionally (and universally) ordered in accordance with a list of five available "ways". For reasons that are as obscure as they are rigidly adhered to, these "ways" are the same regardless of where the chili is being served. Early this century, many Greek immigrants to U.S. cities made their living running coffee shops, hash houses, lunch counters, diners, and other predecessors to the fast food industry. During the post-war years, the popularity of chili con carne had spread into the Midwest. In Cincinnati, Nicholas Lambrinides, the owner of the Skyline, a Greek diner specializing in spaghetti and meat balls, decided to cater to the growing demand for chili. He knew that chili was some kind of spicy ground beef and beans, and that was enough. What he came up with was this dish spiced with Eastern Mediterranean spices, and offered variations ("Ways") as follows: One Way: Served all by itself in a bowl. Unlike southwestern chili, the Cincinnati variety is usually not ordered this way Two Way: Served on a bed of spaghetti, with oyster crackers on the side Three Way: This is the classic Cincinnati Chili, topped with a mountain of shredded cheddar cheese. Four Way: Add either red kidney beans or chopped fresh onions Five Way: Add both beans and onions One recipe version: 2 lbs. lean ground beef 1 quart water 1 28oz. can tomato sauce 1 28oz. can peeled whole tomatoes 2 onions, chopped finely 2 tblsp. cocoa powder 2 tsp. cinnamon 1½ tsp. ground allspice 1 tsp. cumin (seed or ground) 2 tblsp. chili powder 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground black pepper 1½ tblsp. white vinegar 2 toes of garlic 3 bay leaves DO NOT brown the meat first, just combine everything in a large pan or crock pot, and cook slowly for 4 - 5 hours, covered. This is even better if you put in the refrigerator overnight and reheat it. Remove the bay leaves and garlic before serving.
Link Posted: 1/21/2002 7:59:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2002 8:27:40 AM EDT
BenDover, Obviously, there can be no mistaking the Cincinnatti product for real chili, but I do appreciate your explanation of it's origins, The Greek angle makes it all clear, and explains the unusual (for chili) spices and presentation. I have in fact eaten at Skykine Chili here in Ft. Lauderdale. All I can say is that if their version is close to the original, I won't be making a trip to Cincinnati for chili any time soon. No doubt there are better versions made than Skyline's, but none of them count as "real" chili in my book. FWIW, my chili recipe is not really "Texas" chili either. It is more typical of the thick, rich Chile Colorado served in New Mexico and Northern Mexico proper. I have a recipe for a Chile Verde that uses roasted fresh green chiles, pork, onions and whatever else you want to add, like fresh cron or chunked potatoes. It's really good if you like a lighter, but still spicy, chile.
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