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Posted: 1/8/2002 12:24:57 PM EDT
There is only 3 rendering plants left in the L.A. Calif area; ever wonder what happens to the diary cows after they fall over? L.A. County tried to put one of those companies out of business a few years earlier and dead carcasses started to pile up on the farms. ========================================================== Los Angeles Times: Outcry Over Pets in Pet Food [url] http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000001483jan06.story[/url] THE NATION Outcry Over Pets in Pet Food Rendering: The practice of boiling down euthanized dogs and cats for industrial fat and protein causes an uproar in St. Louis. By STEPHANIE SIMON TIMES STAFF WRITER January 6 2002 ST. LOUIS -- It started with footage of Blacky and Scoop, melt-your-heart dogs with no one to claim them, alone at the city pound--and due to be put to death within hours. "No one wants them. Alive, that is," the reporter said. The film then cut to a rendering plant that boils down the city's euthanized dogs, along with dead pigs and cows from local farms and leftover bones, hooves and innards from slaughterhouses. The end products are used to make cosmetics and fertilizer, gelatin and poultry feed, pharmaceuticals and pet food. It was the pet food that got people. The report last month by KMOV-TV's Jamie Allman--headlined "What's Getting Into Your Pets"--suggested that dead dogs and cats from local shelters were ending up in kibble. As proof, Allman aired footage of a tanker truck entering the rendering plant, a truck emblazoned with the motto "Serving the Pet Food Industry." Pet owners went nuts. Thousands turned to KMOV's online polls to register their disgust. Scores more called animal control departments to demand an end to the practice. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch ran a cartoon showing a mangled collar poking out of a bowl of dog food. "It was unbelievable, the amount of reaction we got," Allman said. The Millstadt Rendering Co., a small family business that for decades had been taking the region's euthanized animals free, in what the owners thought was a public service, reeled in the face of so much rage. "A disaster for the industry," groaned Clifton Smith, a consultant to the firm. "There's too many people out there who think their pets are like children." Hoping to free themselves from the public-relations fiasco, the rendering plant announced just before Christmas that it would stop accepting euthanized dogs and cats. But the local animal shelters couldn't stop euthanizing. And so in counties and small towns throughout the region, animal carcasses began to pile up. "We were taken flat-footed," said Chris Byrne, an animal control official in St. Louis County. -- continued --
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 12:26:00 PM EDT
Every solution was pricey. Hauling the animals to the nearest industrial-scale crematory would cost the county more than $57,000 a year. Building a crematory would cost up to $100,000. And there would be the contentious question of where to put it. In the short term, with freezer space limited, the county has been forced to send its dead dogs and cats to a landfill. The city of St. Louis has taken the same route, arranging for a refrigerated trash truck to pick up the carcasses. This makeshift solution has prompted still more concerns. If the landfills are not properly lined, the decaying corpses could leach into ground water. If they're not promptly covered, scavengers can pick off the dead dogs and cats. And, as some have pointed out, chucking Fido in a dump scarcely seems a more dignified end than cooking him in a vat with dead cows. It's a conundrum for animal control officers like Richard Steveson, who has to find a way to dispose of up to 3,500 animals a year in St. Louis. "I like for everything to be done as humanely as possible, even though the animal has already expired," Steveson said. But, given the alternatives, he figures rendering was as good a method as any. He didn't know that the rendered material could end up in pet food, he said. "But even if I had, I don't know what I would have done about it." Lost in all the emotion have been the facts about rendering--and about pet food. Rendering has long been considered one of the most environmentally friendly ways to dispose of animal carcasses, because it recycles them into useful fat and protein. By far the bulk of rendered material comes from slaughterhouses. But some plants also mix in road kill, the trimmings from supermarket delis, dead farm animals and euthanized pets from shelters. Los Angeles city and county shelters send more than 120,000 dead dogs and cats to be rendered in a typical year. Members of The Pet Food Institute, who make 95% of the dog and cat food sold in the United States, use rendered material from livestock in their chow. But they insist there are no ground up pets in their pet food. "It's a matter of good business," spokesman Stephen Payne said. "We've decided that if this is upsetting to people--and it clearly is--we should take extraordinary measures to make sure it never happens." Still, it is not illegal to use rendered material from dogs and cats in pet food. And while no one keeps official figures, there's some evidence it happens. The Food and Drug Administration has found "very, very low levels" of sodium pentobarbital--the chemical used to euthanize animals--in some brands of dog food, said Stephen Sundloff, director of the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine. The agency is investigating whether the traces are "of any significance at all," Sundloff said. -- continued --
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 12:26:33 PM EDT
Overall, experts see little health risk in rendered pets entering the animal (or human) food chain, because the high temperatures used in the process kill most agents of disease. As for the Millstadt Rendering Co., its owners are trying to get back to business as usual. They maintain that the TV report unfairly linked their product to pet food (the tanker truck with the pet industry logo, they say, was headed to a separate rendering plant that handles restaurant grease). Still, they acknowledge they have no idea where their product ends up. It's sold to brokers who sell it to manufacturers. The way they look at it, they don't need to know the details--and the public probably doesn't want to. "We don't have anything to hide," Smith said, "but people really don't want to hear about rendering. It's an ugly thing." For information about reprinting this article, go to http://www.lats.com/rights
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 12:29:50 PM EDT
All this and we've got MILLIONS of starving North Koreans. Hell, they'll eat anything right about now. Anybody got a load configuration for a C141 cubed-out with kitty and doggy carcasses?
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 1:19:32 PM EDT
"Soylent Kibble is... DOGS!"
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 1:33:14 PM EDT
One of the reasons I don't eat Jello (gelatin). It's made from fingernails.....okay, hooves mostly. You should see people faces when they realize I'm not bee essing them. As far as "Your Euthanized dog" that you took to the vet. They freeze em. Then take em to a plant that incinerates them. Had a neighbor who was a vet. Walked out to get my paper and several cats (not dogs) were in the back of his truck where he had forgotten and not stopped at the incineration plant after a late night. Cats were eating cats and dogs now thawed remains. He told me what he did with euthanized animals.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 1:39:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Coz_45-age-caliber: One of the reasons I don't eat Jello (gelatin). It's made from fingernails.....okay, hooves mostly. You should see people faces when they realize I'm not bee essing them.
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Damn Billy Cosby! [puke]
As far as "Your Euthanized dog" that you took to the vet. They freeze em. Then take em to a plant that incinerates them. Had a neighbor who was a vet. Walked out to get my paper and several cats (not dogs) were in the back of his truck where he had forgotten and not stopped at the incineration plant after a late night. Cats were eating cats and dogs now thawed remains. He told me what he did with euthanized animals.
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Damn neighbors! [puke]
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 1:40:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 1:51:45 PM EDT
The film then cut to a rendering plant that boils down the city's euthanized dogs, along with dead pigs and cows from local farms and leftover bones, hooves and innards from slaughterhouses. The end products are used to make cosmetics and fertilizer, gelatin and poultry feed, pharmaceuticals and pet food.
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Mmmmmmmmmmm...Altoids use beef gelatin, and so does tasty gelatin.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 4:45:07 PM EDT
And you wondered what the "other" ingrediants for hot dogs are? We have uncovered the mistery!
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 4:51:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:30:35 PM EDT
[img]http://wsphotofews.excite.com/037/Up/YX/7a/GQ75318.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:39:37 PM EDT
"Taco Bell"?
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:41:46 PM EDT
Out to the landfill. Of course, we have maybe 5 a month, and some owners elect to have their animal creamated, but most don't.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:42:55 PM EDT
I didn't want my dog incinerated so I paid for a burial $1000+!
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:49:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2002 5:50:28 PM EDT by M4]
There used to be a place in Petaluma CA called "Royal Tallow". They had a grinding maching you could seriously fit an 18 wheeler in to. Farmers dropped dead cows there, road kills were dropped there and often dead sea lions and elephant seals found on beaches too. They were all ground up together, boiled and the fat turned in to soap. The rest of the "stuff", I have no idea what they did with it. That was when I lived in the PRK way back when. Check the label of your favorite brand of soap before your next shower, could have a little of ol' Bessy in it if tallow is listed on the label.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:52:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 1:41:41 PM EDT
When I was growing up we had a local with an alligator farm. If ole bessy fell over from bloat she became gator chow. Worked pretty well.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 2:00:50 PM EDT
Hey now, it's my right to be a cannibal.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 2:01:27 PM EDT
oh yeah... Recycle your pets. Thank you.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 2:16:09 PM EDT
The problem is that traces of both the euthanasia drug, as well as the poison in flea collars has also been found in dog food. Apparently some plants don't even remove the collars from the dead pets before grinding and tossing them into the mix. Bits of metal ID tags and buckles HAVE been found in some commercial dog foods. Many concerned pet owners have taken to feeding home made foods to their animals, with astounding results in health, vigor, and longevity. They cook rice, ground meats, vegetables and even fruits, and many dogs' illnesses and symptoms disappear. We may very well be poisoning our pets with commercial foods. Isn't this also how Mad Cow Syndrome started? Grinding diseased carcasses for feed? Prions can survive cooking, you know.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 2:21:51 PM EDT
How was your Thanksgiving Turkey? It was probably a cannibal if you bought it in a store. Locally, the slaughter house takes the remains of the bird to a rendering plant. The remains are ground up and boiled, steemed and sterilized through heat. Then the remains are fed back to turkeys. Road kill and farm animals used to be tossed into the mix too. It is not allowed any more. These plants have TONS of harmful bacteria everywhere, they are breeding grounds for it. One truck driver had a tooth socket get infected through breathing the air and poor hand washing. IT KILLED HIM. The infection spread to his brain like wildfire. my $.02 [puke]
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 3:12:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2002 3:14:08 PM EDT by warlord]
Originally Posted By Hannah_Reitsch: Isn't this also how Mad Cow Syndrome started? Grinding diseased carcasses for feed? Prions can survive cooking, you know.
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Once I saw on a PBS documentary on Mad Cow, the prions can't be "killed," even though they are actually not living, by conventional means of boiling, chemcials etc. The scientist even buried in his backyard and come back 6 months it is still active. Prety scary huh?
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 3:36:38 PM EDT
Uuhhh........ever hear of Burger King?........[dracula]
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 4:02:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2002 4:03:42 PM EDT by reddobie]
2 of the 4 animal shelters in the Las Vegas Valley have their own crematory, the other 2 have thiers taken to the landfill. Also, it is legal to put dead dogs or cats, but no large animal in your trash pick up. This is done by cheap and uncaring owners.
Link Posted: 1/10/2002 4:21:55 PM EDT
I worked a summer job at the humane society one summer. They threw the carcasses in the dumpsters after putting them to sleep. They only killed the ugly and diseased ones usually. They tried to keep the cute ones longer for adoption.
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