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Posted: 10/20/2001 8:45:20 AM EDT
I am looking for a toyota PU, what was the last year for the strait axle? How do these do off-road, its mostly going to be used on the street though. Is the good 4 banger the 22R? How many miles can they last if taken care of? Are there any things to look for that go wrong on these trucks?
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:47:55 AM EDT
These are good trucks and last foe ever,the bad thing is and way I don't but them is the power. They have very lil. even the full size.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:58:35 AM EDT
1985 was the last year for the solid front axle, however, you can do a conversion with bolt in parts to make ANY year Toyota (up to 1996/Tacoma) a solid front axle... I love mine, its an 1985, highly modded. If you need specifics as to what to look for, let me know.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 9:13:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2001 9:45:24 AM EDT by Arock]
There's a pickup truck Toyota makes but doesn't sell in the US. I drove one in South Africa last year and was VERY impressed. It's about the size of a Tacoma but it's less stylish. Looks more like the earlier design but on steroids. Many folks abroad are replacing their old favorite Land Rovers with the Toyota. It will carry a HUGE load. Bounce over remote terrain all day and just doesn't break. I have no idea why Toyota hasn't marketed this truck in the USA. I brought dealer info back from SA and inquired about importing a couple of them but it looks like a bureaucratic nightmare. Importing a used version looks easier. **Edited to say the truck i mentioned is a Landcruiser HZJ75 Pickup. AFAIK they are not sold here.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 9:24:34 AM EDT
I have 1990 Toyota Ext.cab p/u, it has 115000 miles and running perrrrfectly[:D] The only problem I have had with it, is the exhaust, I had to replace the whole thing about six times. Maybe thats because I 4 wheel on the beach[:D] Bottom drivers side door starting to rust pretty bad, but it is 11 years old. If I was to buy a new one, I would go for the Tundra.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 10:46:15 AM EDT
After driving the F-150, GMC 1500, and Dodge 1500, I went to the Toyota dealer and drove the 2001 Tundra. Looked no further.... The 4.7L V-8 has plenty of power...plenty. The truck is rated to pull 7,500lbs, and I have done so. Easily. I have filled the bed with pea-gravel(700+lbs) and again had no problem with power or handling. As soon as possible I'm going to add the TRD supercharger. I also get 22MPG on the highway. And the Toyota warranty beats the others that I looked at. Lew
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 11:10:13 AM EDT
My wife has a 1990. Never took it off road, but the thing is holding up like a champ. Rides a lot smoother than my 1987 Nissan.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 11:42:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2001 11:42:04 AM EDT by omar]
lets see. 4x4 Toyotas I've owned: (2) 1980 (one was a beater that I restored) (1) 1980 Toyota Trekker (fibergass back and prelude to the 4runner) (2) 1985 one regular bed bought new, and one longbed I bought that was totally thrashed and I partially restored 1990 V6 which I shouldn't have sold 1986 4Runner 22R(lost in divorce) 1999 4runner V6 The only thing that went wrong with the older trucks was the fuel pump on the 22r motor, and that was it. I bought the 1980 for $1100.00 with a failed four speed transmission that I replaced with a rebuilt 5-speed. I added a cap, new tires and painted it OD green for a total of $2100.00. [IMG]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1320253&a=11616093&p=41225703&Sequence=1&res=high[/IMG] That was the one I miss the most. I had a 2WD longbed with over 300K never opened up. I'm looking for a 1987-89 pickup or 4runner for weekend duty and as a restoration project as soon as my Neon sells. Just change the oil in them and don't buy one from a kid. Try to get a one owner truck. Don't buy one that has been "modified" other than tires. An unmodified truck is less likely to have seen sustained abuse. I take my trucks offroad frequently, but don't thrash them. Thrashing will lead to failure eventually, and I've been there in the past. Jim
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 12:43:37 PM EDT
[img]http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1391821&a=12234609&p=46278814[/img].
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 1:03:30 PM EDT
Like I said they are VERY good trucks but have NO! power if you need to really work it you need to look at something else. Don't lets guys like Tippie f* with you I did every thing he talked about with my S-10. You could do that lil. bit with a van if you had to. I'm working on getting the new Chevy HD, 8.1L big block,Allison trany,ect. now thats a damn truck!
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 3:14:12 PM EDT
The last 3 trucks I have owned were 'yotas. 1: 1986 Extra-Cab short bed 4wd. 2: 1993 Extended Cab S/B 4wd. 3 and present: 1997 T-100 Ext Cab S/B 4wd. The 1st one had the 22RE engine in it (EFI) I agree, absolutely no power what so ever when it was cold. Once it warmed up, it ran fine, but I never tried hauling anything major in it. The 2nd one I loved very much. I went for it because it had the ext. cab, so I could actually (but never did) fit someone in the back. It have the 3.0 V6 in it. Toyota had to replace the entire engine it (FOR FREE!!) after a recall on all V6s from 1989 to 1995 for the head gaskets leaking. Sadly, while on vacation with my wife in Pigeon Forge, TN, it got borrowed, and hasnt been seen since. (Thank God I kep my toys that were along for the trip with me, but my medical jump bag and a spare set of turnout gear I kept in there were gone, not to mention everything else I kept in there [>Q] And that brings us to my final and present one: I do love my T-100. It have the 3.4 V6 in it, which is fine for what I do. I dont do that much hauling with it, although I did pretty much move all my belongings in it when I bought my house. It does well for power (Its not going to pull a house or anything) and has the room. The most surprizing thing is the turning radius. Gotta watch that tail swing on it, its almost as wide as a dual axle ladder truck. :o) Hopefully, I can hold onto this one for a while. Email me if you have any other questions. The Whistlepig [USA]
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 5:28:05 PM EDT
Q.what was the last year for the strait axle?A.1985 for the U.S. Q.How do these do off-road, its mostly going to be used on the street though. A.Quite well depending on modifications and good in stock form, depending on terrain. These trucks have a big following and many aftermarket parts are available. I would also have to say they are one of the Jeeps major competitors for off roading. Q.Is the good 4 banger the 22R? A. The 22R is a good engine and the 22RE is the fuel injected version. There was also a turbo version available for a couple of years 22RET? Q.How many miles can they last if taken care of? A.Hard to say, but I would say 300K if taken care of. My last truck had over 165K before it was totaled and my current 4Runner has 236K on it. Q. Are there any things to look for that go wrong on these trucks? A.Not too many things that I am aware of if not abused. I would check for factory recalls. I have heard that the 84-85 are prone to a little more rust, but I think this still falls under good care. Just like any vehicle they will wear out parts, but all of mine have been more than adequately relaiable. On the truck I replaced fuel pump and oil pump other than that, normal items of wear. On the 4Runner (1)Waterpump, (1)Starter, (1)Alternator, and (1)Clutch. All of these items were replaced well after 100K, which is plenty acceptable to me. HTH BMB
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 5:47:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2001 5:42:09 PM EDT by gus]
I bought an `84 SR5 shortbed new, and loved it. It was short on power, but had plenty for off-roading. I had it for three years and sold it because I was tired of paying for full coverage insurance. I've been driving beaters ever since. The only things that went wrong with my truck in 90k miles were: The bed began to rust badly (the only American made part on the truck), and the parking brake levers on the rear brake backing plates siezed up at their pivots. I just pulled the drums and freed them up with a little liquid wrench. In snow, there is nothing better than a Toyota 4X4. Period. My only complaint was that it rode like it had NO suspension (very stiff). That was a helpful trait off road though. When I sold it, it was bought for a 16 year old kid by his parents. 3 weeks later I saw it at the salvage yard - it had been rolled down a hill.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 5:55:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2001 5:51:56 PM EDT by SBR7_11]
22R and 22RE are good for beating around. Crank damper nose at the front crank seal gets grooved after while ond flings oil all over front. Watch tha timing chains also, and oil change, the hydraulic tensioner will allow chain to flop and slap/break the chain guides, thus will saw through cover and fill crankcase with coolant. 88-89 had crappy throttle position sensor, if # ends with 28030, get the revised 28050 sensor, it will allow you to check set timing again, as computer will see "idle" input. Piston slap noise cold, Toyota has changed piston design a couple times, don't worry about it. 88-95 V-6; Toyota covered all head gaskets, extended to 8 yr/100,000, most are do now, really late production may get DSM authorization. Seen a lot of motors replaced, people drove with the white fog out the exhaust till motor quit. 97- present 3.4 V-6; first 97 production had head gkt leak at driver side front of deck, all done there. Supercharger available, but don't drive your Tacoma in the snow, too much bottom end. Ok on 4 Runner, heavier truck. Tundra; V-8, based on the Lexus, Lexus use aluminum block, Tundra has iron block. No supercharger available yet, talk is fear of warranty claims on broken axles. Odd brake noise or vibration from rear, light weight drums, use 4-Runner drums, but this will make truck heavier and exceed weight claimed to gov't, something stupid there.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 6:04:53 PM EDT
I have 91 extracab w/125k, I haven't changed a thing on it yet except for tires (and of course the maintenance fluids). altought I know it's overdues for belts & such...
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 6:08:27 PM EDT
My '98 Tacoma 4x4 X-cab has a 2.7l 4 and it has *plenty* of torque. The 3.8l (?) 6 is even better, but mpg suffers. No problems with mine except one of the valve tappets or lifters ticks when the weather is cold. I really should have it looked at, but I doubt it is very serious, just annoying.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 6:13:29 PM EDT
Zip, I've worked in a Toyota parts dept. for the last 13 years. If you have any questions that aren't answered here, let me know, I can get the answers you need no problem.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 6:33:51 PM EDT
Thanks for all the info. So is the solid axle the best setup for off road stuff? What sort of MPG would you get with the v6? So what is the best motor, the V6 or the I4? Thanks guys
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 7:40:07 PM EDT
I don't know where some of you guys get the idea that the Toyotas have no power. My 93 with the V6 regularly pulls 5000 lbs. on a trailer. Pulls it fine, stopping it is the problem. Has 150,000 miles on it now, had the head gasket replaced under warranty, uses oil badly now, but its paid for and I can buy alot of oil for what one payment on a new one would be. The previous Toyota had the 22R engine and it ran flawlessly for 109,000 miles before someone pulled out in front of me and totaled it for me. The 22R four banger is fine for anything but heavy hauling. Probably will be more trouble free than the V6, but I need the bigger engine because I haul lead (for bullet casting) on a regular basis.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 7:42:38 PM EDT
Thanks for helping more American auto workers lose thier jobs.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 7:50:09 PM EDT
I currently have an 84 and probably put well over 300,000 miles on models 80 through 86. I rolled an 81 because a brake part that is designed to equalize fluid pressure between front discs and rear drums failed and locked up my front wheels as I tried to brake lightly through a turn after dewfall. If I had pumped the brakes, or not braked at all, I would have been fine, but thats lookin' back... The brakes don't do well when wet, as in rain, either. I replaced enough of those front oil seals to notice that they seem to last about 40,000 miles and that the leaking oil will cause the alternator to fail as well. The front pulley throws the oil right into it. On the 86 EFI it was a leaking power steering pump that killed the alternator, and those are expensive as they have a built in regulator. Keep the door hinge pins greased as they start to oval and drop the door out of alignment. The older style tailgate tend to break off the top lip of the tailgate if exposed to abuse, as well as the step style factory bumpers lose the sheet metal. The older 20R and 22R engines had a flawed design for the exhaust manifold and heatshield. It tended to get too hot and warp. Up to about 80 or 81 models Toyota had a secret warranty and would replace them every 40,000 miles for free. The newer design heat shield didn't cover the manifold with sheet metal. Can vouch for tensioner problem, had one go on me and the timing chain jumped a tooth.. Another engine I replaced had the wrist pin retainer clip not aligned vertically, which weakened it, it dropped into the oil pan and allowed the pin to score the cylinder wall. It is possible to defeat the door lock with a pencil or wire, easily. Any semi experienced car thief can sleepwalk through those. On the other hand, my current truck has 250,000 miles with no major component failure and even though the original clutch has been slipping for the last 50,000 miles, I haven't bothered to replace it. It has developed an odd electrical problem though.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:07:33 PM EDT
My very first vehicle was a 78 Toyota pickup, 20R engine, 2WD, long bed, and [yellow]YELLOW[/yellow]. My family still owns that beast. It just REFUSES to die! [:)]
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:15:13 PM EDT
I will never own another one again!Had a 94 ex cab 4x4 v6 Happiest day was buying it and selling it.I had a valve spring go out at 55k then agian on the same cylinder that was worked on at 100k their custumer service SUCKS.was under powered for towing 19' jet boat.bought american after that.
Link Posted: 10/20/2001 8:22:08 PM EDT
Zip, Lots of good advice here. The Toyota solid axle trucks are quite legendary off road actually. The only weak link is the front birfield joints, which most normal users will never break. I have worked in a 4X4 shop where we regularly did V-8 conversions and the transfer case and axles last a good long time with that abuse. If you are not doing rock crawling type wheeling or super tall lifts, look at a newer IFS truck. They will be in better shape, ride better, and are more readily available in the extended cab configuration. The Taco's new 2.7L I-4 puts out about 150 HP and 177 LB FT of torque. The truck has plenty of scoot and will get in the high 20s for highway MPG. While not up to the task of hauling 4x8 sheet goods on a regular basis Toyotas are damn fine trucks that give a good long service life.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 11:55:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ernie: Thanks for helping more American auto workers lose thier jobs.
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Sorry to dissappoint you ERNIE, but the Tundra is built in EVANSVILLE, INDIANA, your state of residence via your info at left of page. Tacoma also built in the USA, Fremont, CA if I remember correctly, AND we use DELPHI batterys, DELPHI (Harrison Radiator-GM) radiators. As a side note, Camry, Sienna, and Avalon are made in KY, the Corolla in CA and Canada.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 12:17:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Whistlepig: The last 3 trucks I have owned were 'yotas. 1: 1986 Extra-Cab short bed 4wd. 2: 1993 Extended Cab S/B 4wd. 3 and present: 1997 T-100 Ext Cab S/B 4wd. The 1st one had the 22RE engine in it (EFI) I agree, absolutely no power what so ever when it was cold. Once it warmed up, it ran fine, but I never tried hauling anything major in it. The 2nd one I loved very much. I went for it because it had the ext. cab, so I could actually (but never did) fit someone in the back. It have the 3.0 V6 in it. Toyota had to replace the entire engine it (FOR FREE!!) after a recall on all V6s from 1989 to 1995 for the head gaskets leaking. Sadly, while on vacation with my wife in Pigeon Forge, TN, it got borrowed, and hasnt been seen since. (Thank God I kep my toys that were along for the trip with me, but my medical jump bag and a spare set of turnout gear I kept in there were gone, not to mention everything else I kept in there [>Q] And that brings us to my final and present one: I do love my T-100. It have the 3.4 V6 in it, which is fine for what I do. I dont do that much hauling with it, although I did pretty much move all my belongings in it when I bought my house. It does well for power (Its not going to pull a house or anything) and has the room. The most surprizing thing is the turning radius. Gotta watch that tail swing on it, its almost as wide as a dual axle ladder truck. :o) Hopefully, I can hold onto this one for a while. Email me if you have any other questions. The Whistlepig [USA]
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Dang! I don't like Toyotas but I think you may have had some bad luck with the first 2. The TRD w/V6 is not to bad they tell me. With nothing in the truck I bet it would be a good lil. off reader.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 12:25:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Right-Wing: Zip, Lots of good advice here. The Toyota solid axle trucks are quite legendary off road actually. The only weak link is the front birfield joints, which most normal users will never break. I have worked in a 4X4 shop where we regularly did V-8 conversions and the transfer case and axles last a good long time with that abuse. If you are not doing rock crawling type wheeling or super tall lifts, look at a newer IFS truck. They will be in better shape, ride better, and are more readily available in the extended cab configuration. The Taco's new 2.7L I-4 puts out about 150 HP and 177 LB FT of torque. The truck has plenty of scoot and will get in the high 20s for highway MPG. While not up to the task of hauling 4x8 sheet goods on a regular basis Toyotas are damn fine trucks that give a good long service life.
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Dude! thats great. You could get an older truck and do a V8 conv. Your not gon'a really work the motor so you can't do that bad on gas. I only know Chevy but I bet it's the same with Ford to,you could get a 350 for NOTHING and parts are every damn place you go. I would not try a Toyota V8 yet I bet there high as heck and you would have to rig like hell to put it in a old truck. You should do it man! PS:I just like to make "stuff" do what you want[:)]
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 12:46:05 PM EDT
One of the current "cool guy" tricks for Toyota conversions is to use a GM Vortec 4.3 from a wrecked S-10. It mounts up exactly like a 350, but is considerably smaller, lighter, and easier to keep cool. The wiring is "challenging", but not impossible. My favorite one that I have worked with was a Ford Mustang 5.0 in a '85 Xtra Cab. It still got about 17MPG and would scare the hell out of the punk kids in their crappy old Camaros. Check out Downey Off Road, and Off Road North West. There is as much hard core Toyota stuff out there as Jeep - Maybe more. Personally, I would stick with a late model stocker. They tend to last forever.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 12:59:18 PM EDT
"One of the current "cool guy" tricks for Toyota conversions is to use a GM Vortec 4.3 from a wrecked S-10" O-REALLLLLLLLY! LOL I just wrecked one[:)] I think I would just keep the 4.3 in the S-10 have you seen the ZR2? I'm truck shopping to I may not be able to hold back.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 1:00:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/21/2001 1:38:21 PM EDT by palmer]
Originally Posted By SBR7_11:
Originally Posted By Ernie: Thanks for helping more American auto workers lose thier jobs.
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Sorry to dissappoint you ERNIE, but the Tundra is built in EVANSVILLE, INDIANA, your state of residence via your info at left of page. Tacoma also built in the USA, Fremont, CA if I remember correctly, AND we use DELPHI batterys, DELPHI (Harrison Radiator-GM) radiators. As a side note, Camry, Sienna, and Avalon are made in KY, the Corolla in CA and Canada.
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Darn it, ya beat me to it. Brother-in-law works at the Fremont plant. Alot of people are under the impression that if it's not an American company, then it's not made here and they take away American jobs. It's just not true. Yes most parts for Toyota, Honda, Nissan parts are made overseas, some parts are made here and they are assembled here in the US, which create employment. My brother is manager for Ford in NY and he said alot of Fords and Chevy parts are made in other countries. FWIW, in 1989, I had a 1987 Ford Bronco that gave me nothing but problems. I had three months and the rear differential cracked and head casket needed to be replaced. Three weeks after that, they had to replace the tie rods and the carb had to be rebuilt. I could go on and on about the problems I've had with an F150 I had a few years ago, so........ Like I said previously, I have a 1990 Toy/P/U for ELEVEN years now, only problem was the exhaust rusting out because of the salt water and driving on the beach.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 1:22:54 PM EDT
a2carbine Now is a good time to buy, with those gimmick interest rates. I see that Ford has a brand new FX4 package on the Ranger - intended to compete with ZR2 and TRD. It looks like more than just a trim package. I like the Chebbie, but I've got younguns' and it is illegal to put car seats in side facing jump seats - soooo it is Toyota or Dodge for me. BTW seen the factory supercharger you can put on a new Toyota V6? Can you say HOT ROD?
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 1:28:00 PM EDT
"I like the Chebbie, but I've got younguns' and it is illegal to put car seats in side facing jump seats - soooo it is Toyota or Dodge for me." O-I know all about it,I think I will go full size this time. I looked at some 4door mid size trucks but have you seen the crapy lil. bed you have left wwith them? Not muck of a truck.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 1:35:01 PM EDT
I have installed 2 or 3 supers already. They really get the bottom end, but not a whole lot of top end difference seen. Remember, we are installing them at time of sale, so we have to keep some limits, or warranty claims will bite back. On the P/U, you really don't want to be in the wet or snow, major problem keeping tires on the ground. With the 4-Runner, not too much problem there, as it has more weight overall and on the rear tires. The Tundra V8 is a different story, definitly too many balls, fear of warranty claims for rear axles supposedly, never keep the tires on the ground, hard to in normal aspirated model anyway.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 1:49:13 PM EDT
a2carbine, Nissan is offering the Frontier Crew Cab with a six foot box for '02. Between that and the factory SC, that might be one to look at. SBR7_11 How much boost do you boys set 'em up with? How is the fuel economy effected? Right foot pressure notwithstanding!
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 4:01:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/21/2001 3:59:31 PM EDT by SBR7_11]
We have no control as to setting the boost, factory set, the super has a by-pass valve on it. If you have seen the 3 piece intake on the 3.4 V6, the super replaces the upper 2 runner sections, and the throttle body bolts to the side inlet on the super. Watch out on the drive pulley on the nose of the super, when throttle flipped, the belt appears to want to jump off over the edge of the pulley, TRD and the super's maker have not modified the pulley with a larger fence. Have not had belt(s) come off, just looks that way. As to milege, should be bassicaly the same with plain driving, but maybe less with "hammer down" compared to normal aspiration, but the EFI and fuel trim via Ox sensors will help keep fuel in check...Note--TRD says PREMIUM FUEL ONLY.
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 9:23:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/21/2001 9:39:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 5:21:46 AM EDT
Back up with this one. I was wondering what year they switched to the EFI system? Has anyone put a lift on there truck? If i lifted it about 3.5-4" and put on 33" tires would I have to swap gears?
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 9:27:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zip: Back up with this one. I was wondering what year they switched to the EFI system? Has anyone put a lift on there truck? If i lifted it about 3.5-4" and put on 33" tires would I have to swap gears?
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I believe, and someone correct me if I'm wrong, that you could get EFI in '84 on the 2x4 and as early as '85 on the 4x4. Here is my truck, '84 SR5 3" suspension, 3" body, 33x12.50 swamper radials. I still have the stock 4.10 gears, and the 22R (with 213000 miles)turns them fine, just don't expect to go more than 70mph on the freeway. If you can afford it, I would change the gear ratio to say 4.56 or so, the truck would be much peppier. [img]http://mywebpage.netscape.com/a4xgatorusa/truckfront1.jpg[/img] [img]http://mywebpage.netscape.com/a4xgatorusa/truckrear1.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 9:45:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 9:47:05 PM EDT
Can anyone recommend a lift kit? Or maybe ones to stay away from. Are blocks bad? Are tuff-country EZ-ride lifts good? Also, is the EFI system better then the carb, in terms of power, mpg and reliability?
Link Posted: 11/7/2001 10:30:34 PM EDT
If you are going to wheel it, you might want to just put Chevy springs on the back and Jeep springs on the front. You will need somebody that can weld a bit, but this is a fairly common mod. The EFI is much better if you are going to wheel it, and has slightly more power. Carbs can get screwy if you are at steep angles. There is plenty of info on Toys on the Pirate forums. Just do a search. [url]www.pirate4x4.com[/url] [img]http://www.imagestation.com/picture/pa9698d7dc0f7758458c0232a3096f632/fe52f17a.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 1:23:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By texastactical: I have owned 7 Toyota 4x4s over the last 17 years. 84 4x4 rolled it! 79 4x4 sold it 85 4x4 rolled it! 86 4runner stolen 86 4x4 stolen 84 4x4 sold it 88 4x4 still got it! The 84 and 85s were my favs. "Iron" MIke
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So you rolled them?
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 6:48:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 8:27:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 8:44:44 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zip: Can anyone recommend a lift kit? Or maybe ones to stay away from. Are blocks bad? Are tuff-country EZ-ride lifts good? Also, is the EFI system better then the carb, in terms of power, mpg and reliability?
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Mine is riding on a 3" Rough Country kit. It came with 4 replacement springs, bushings, brackets, shocks, etc. I am very pleased with it. It rides very good(although my truck is a little heavier than most toyotas), has good suspension travel, and only cost $400. Ive wheeled the truck very hard and nothing has broken.
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 10:52:54 AM EDT
Hey reverend do you have any more pics of the truck? I tried emailing you but it wouldnot work.
Link Posted: 11/8/2001 1:37:49 PM EDT
I have a 97 2.7L Tacoma 4x4 and love it. Plenty of power for my purposes. Gets about 19mpg with the 31 metric tires. My next truck will likely be a Tundra. There really is a quality difference. A friend had an 84 Toyata 2 wheel drive and put over 450,000 miles on it before the body rusted away. The engine was still going strong.
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