Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/28/2001 8:14:24 PM EDT
I was thinking of starting of reloading my own ammo and I don't know where to start. The rounds I'd like to reload are going to be 308win and 40S&W. Now should I know I should start off saving my brass when I go shooting and everything but what will I need to get started? About how much money do's it cost to start out? Last I think if I did reload I'm going to be one of thou people that may load about 5,000 rds and I'll be happy for a year or so. Thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 9/28/2001 8:19:51 PM EDT
Started reloading 308 3 years ago. Accuracy improved from 2.25 to .75" @100 in my FAL. I don't think I'm saving any money other than now I'm enjoying my rifle instead of selling it at a loss and buying something that does shoot. Never mix brass lots. Buy new brass. Document every round manufactured. Count how many times you reload it. saved up brass is garbage. Unreliable. You gotta be really anal to make this work for you!
Link Posted: 9/28/2001 8:23:35 PM EDT
Just save the non-military brass. The military primers are hard to punch out. I do reuse usually commerical brass from my range shooting.
Link Posted: 9/28/2001 8:24:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By grimshaw: Started reloading 308 3 years ago. Accuracy improved from 2.25 to .75" @100 in my FAL. I don't think I'm saving any money other than now I'm enjoying my rifle instead of selling it at a loss and buying something that does shoot. Never mix brass lots. Buy new brass. Document every round manufactured. Count how many times you reload it. saved up brass is garbage. Unreliable. You gotta be really anal to make this work for you!
View Quote
Thanks for the info
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:00:52 AM EDT
This is another aspect of shooting sports. The process is not difficult to learn, but you have to be 100% ATTENTIVE & FOCUSED on what you are doing, i.e. you shouldn't be watching TV, talking with your buddies on the telephone etc, but I usually listed to the radio. IT CAN BE DANGEROUS. And you must keep your work area neat, clean and organized. Where to start? Go to a gun store that carries books, and get 2 books on reloading, because for me I want to double-check what the other manual says just to be on the safe side. I personally suggest the Lyman Reloading Manual and the RCBS manual. These manuals will also list loads with for different powder/bullet weight combinations. Read the manuals. Dillon Precision, a maker of reloading equipment also makes a video for a nominal charge on how to reload using their machines[url]www.dillonprecision.com[/url] you may want to buy their video and see the process. I believe the NRA also has a reloading video available for a nominal cost also[url]www.nra.org[/url] Talk to some of your fellow shooters about reloading, and ask them questions, and see if they if would teach you how. Here is the process for straight walled cases such as 45ACP, 38/357 Rem. Mag: 1) tumbling step. Clean all your cases with a tumbler, optional, some skip this step, but I like it because it makes your cases look shiny, and it gives me a chance to cull out the defective ones such as cracks in the case mouth, etc. This step should be done outdoors and/or away from living space and away from food handling area to prevent lead contamination, i.e. in garage, patio etc. 2) The sizing step. Squeeze the expanded fired cases back into pre-fired dimensions and poke out the old primer. 3) Priming step. Push in a new primer. 4) Belling step. Flare the case mouth, so that the new bullet goes in easily. 5) Powder charge step. charge the case with the recommended quantity of smokeless power. THIS IS STEP THAT YOU MUST PAY STRICT ATTENTION TO. You MUST charge only the correct amount of powder into the case and no more, double charging can be EXTREMELY DANGEROUS, and can result in destroyed guns, personal injury and/or death! To cut down on the chance of double-charge problem, I use a medium speed powder such as Alliant’s Unique. There is a bunch of powders out there. 6) Put a bullet on the case mouth. 7) Seat the bullet to the correct depth. and you’re finished. This step bullet seating step. For me personally, it would not be feasible to reload 223Rem because you can buy factory loaded ammo for a few pennies more than it would cost to reload them, it is not worth the extra trouble considering the amount of labor required. Here I am talking about general shooting
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:03:03 AM EDT
rounds where the emphasizes is not on maximum accuracy. Now if you shoot 68-69 grain match loads, then it would be different. Loading rifle cases(bottle necked cases, such as 223Rem/5.56NATO, 308Win/7.62NATO) is a bit more complicated and is not as cost effective because there must be more physical handling needed that was not required for straight walled pistol cases. You must lubricate the cases with case lube before you size, and also remove it after you size. And you must also check to be sure that the length of the cases does not exceed the recommended amount, because every time you size the case it stretches a bit. And if so you must trimmed and deburred the case mouth to bring it back into specs. How many times can you reload a rifle case? It depends on how much powder you load into the round, more powder shorter case life. After a while the primer pocket will be too big to hold the primer in after you fire it, or the case mouth will crack after sizing. AS to the amount of equipment? You need a loading press, weighing scale, calipers that measure to the .001”, dies and shell plate for the caliber you plan to reload, a loading bench. Bear in mind that it is possible you can use the same shell plate for multiple types of rounds, i.e. 45ACP, 30-06, 308Win. I personally recommend a progressive press, which makes a round ever up/down cycle of the handle, single stage presses are a waste of time. Plus you need what I call the consumables, i.e. powder, primers, bullets. There you have it, generally that how its done. This not rocket science, just pay attention to the details and you on to a new aspect of shooting. Of course you can shoot more because for the same money you got more ammo.
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:08:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2001 5:08:41 AM EDT by LS1Eddie]
Don't even think about saving money. Do think about shooting more. [:)] As Warload said, it ain't rocket science, but does require your full attention. Every mistake I've made at the reloading bench was the result of an interruption or inattentiveness on my part. Fortunately, I caught most of my mistakes before the round made it to the range. Over the years I've still managed to chamber and attempt to fire three rounds with no powder charge. Potentially dangerous. Good luck, Eddie
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:15:20 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:15:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2001 5:24:29 AM EDT
Reload in the winter and shoot in the summer, covers all seasons. I find it relaxing to reload. 40's are a problem due to the Glock having an unsupported case. you can get a guage (Midway or Wideners) to drop the case in to check its specs.
Top Top