Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 4/9/2006 8:43:44 PM EDT
What if one wanted a short barreled inline shotgun?

Thanks
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:47:29 PM EDT
No, they are not considered firearms.

Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:53:37 PM EDT
Thanks

I had always assumed they fell under the NFA but not the GCA

Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:56:46 PM EDT
Anyone ever tried to make a muzzleloading machine gun.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:02:56 PM EDT
From the NFA:

(g) Antique firearm
The term “antique firearm” means any firearm not designed or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:09:23 PM EDT
No muzzle loading machinegun, but you can make a Billinghurst-Requa volley gun. It had 25 barrels lined up and a loading strip that held the 25 cartridges. Four of them were used at Morris Island, South Carolina, during the Siege of Battery Wagner. Cross your fingers and America's Civil War magazine may accept my article about the siege for publication.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:14:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By OFFascist:
Anyone ever tried to make a muzzleloading machine gun.



Kinda sorta

i cannot find much on google but in the 17th century there were rigging guns

imagine a 20 barreled roman candle

each barrel had about 12 charges each stacked on each other it fired the first one and then moved back to the breech

took forever to load but im beting it was pretty impressive to set off at another ship at point blank range

it was supposed to shoot up the other ships rigging not sure if it really worked for that purpose
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:22:40 PM EDT
T/C Encore is. Requires a background check to purchase. I think the Savage smokeless frontstuffer does as well.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:24:05 PM EDT
It sure seems like it because they were not manufactured in or before 1898.

Thanks Burley
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:40:30 PM EDT
The Encore requires a background check because it can be converted to fire centerfire cartridges.

Most other muzzleloaders do not require a background check because they cannot be modified to fire cartridges. I presume they are considered replica firearms and therefore are not subject to the GCA (or whatever, not really up on laws anymore).

As far as a short-barrel shotgun, I have no idea. It might be best to ring the BATFE and ask them. The thing is, if you do have a blackpowder shotgun, you'll only have one shot. I would much rather have a pump or auto with an 18.5" barrel.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:29:17 PM EDT
Short barrel muzzleloader is OK if i recall correctly

one of those companies that does commrative guns did a 10" 10ga double barrel "stagecoach" gun

also they sell cap and ball revolvers with shoulder stocks
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:37:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CRC:
From the NFA:

(g) Antique firearm
The term “antique firearm” means any firearm not designed or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.



Ive got an old Krag(pre-98) that someone decided to bubbaise by cutting down the stock, does this mean I can SBR it without paperwork?

Not that I would ruin such a fine gun more than it already has been, but just to know that I could.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:39:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BuckeyeRifleman:

Originally Posted By CRC:
From the NFA:

(g) Antique firearm
The term “antique firearm” means any firearm not designed or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.



Ive got an old Krag(pre-98) that someone decided to bubbaise by cutting down the stock, does this mean I can SBR it without paperwork?

Not that I would ruin such a fine gun more than it already has been, but just to know that I could.




no read highlighted text
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:41:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By www-glock19-com:

Originally Posted By BuckeyeRifleman:

Originally Posted By CRC:
From the NFA:

(g) Antique firearm
The term “antique firearm” means any firearm not designed or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.



Ive got an old Krag(pre-98) that someone decided to bubbaise by cutting down the stock, does this mean I can SBR it without paperwork?

Not that I would ruin such a fine gun more than it already has been, but just to know that I could.




no read highlighted text



Gotcha thanks, I think this is a sign I should go to bed.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 8:03:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2006 8:04:37 AM EDT by EOD_Guy]

Originally Posted By www-glock19-com:

Originally Posted By BuckeyeRifleman:

Originally Posted By CRC:
From the NFA:

(g) Antique firearm
The term “antique firearm” means any firearm not designed or redesigned for using rim fire or conventional center fire ignition with fixed ammunition and manufactured in or before 1898 (including any matchlock, flintlock, percussion cap, or similar type of ignition system or replica thereof, whether actually manufactured before or after the year 1898) and also any firearm using fixed ammunition manufactured in or before 1898, for which ammunition is no longer manufactured in the United States and is not readily available in the ordinary channels of commercial trade.



Ive got an old Krag(pre-98) that someone decided to bubbaise by cutting down the stock, does this mean I can SBR it without paperwork?

Not that I would ruin such a fine gun more than it already has been, but just to know that I could.




no read highlighted text



There are different definitions of antique firearms in the Gun Control Act and the National Firearms Act. The NFA does not allow antiques to use current fixed ammunition (see above), while the GCA does allow current fixed ammunition in original firearms (not replicas). The main result is that there will never be an antique machine gun using currently available ammunition.
Top Top