Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 4/9/2006 6:14:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2006 4:36:17 AM EDT by captainpooby]
Hemet raws suckee! Ret those who lide decide!


BEIJING - Hog heaven has come to China.
Harley-Davidson opened its first dealership in China yesterday, with promises to bring its trademark easy-riding attitude to bikers in the world's most sought-after market.

"All around the world, it's been synonymous with freedom, open roads, raw power and good times, and we expect the same things," said David Foley, managing director of the China division for Harley-Davidson Asia.

The small showroom sits just on the edge of the Fourth Ring Road - about a 20-minute drive from the heart of town - where farmers still push carts on the street.

Parked in the center of the store were a handful of sleek, chrome-and-leather Harley models gleaming under spotlights.

Customers posed for photos with the bikes and exclaimed how shiny they were.

After-sale services also will be offered, along with rider training and events including organized rides.


The Associated Press



www.nydailynews.com/business/story/407306p-344832c.html
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 7:35:20 AM EDT
Why reak oir? All time reak oir!
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 7:38:40 AM EDT
So do they still ship their stuff to the States, and then ship it BACK to China?

Or do they get their H-D swag "factory direct"???
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:02:30 AM EDT
Ah, the viblations of big motor make cheeky snacks want love me long time! Day happy now that Amelican bike between my regs!
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:06:08 AM EDT
me rike my bike
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:06:24 AM EDT
I find this really fucking funny to see a bunch of Asian Hells Angels prowling Bejing...


Probably a smart move my Harley, Lots of little Chinamen dying to get off their mopeds and on a cruiser
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 4:35:45 AM EDT
If you by a Harley in China does that make it a rice bike? How long before they copy it?
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 4:37:01 AM EDT
I though this was another mags thread
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 4:39:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
If you by a Harley in China does that make it a rice bike? How long before they copy it?



China will be as big as JApan as far as bikes go in just a few years. They already sell some "Harley" style bikes in the states. There QA is improving every year.
Poor Harley....I hope .gov doesn't save there ass this go round.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 4:41:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
If you by a Harley in China does that make it a rice bike? How long before they copy it?



They copied them right after WW2..............your title is some funny shit tho....
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 4:57:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bigthicket:

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
If you by a Harley in China does that make it a rice bike? How long before they copy it?



They copied them right after WW2..............your title is some funny shit tho....



I had them in stitches at work yesterday when I found this in the paper. They didnt believe the story was true the way I told it.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 5:34:40 AM EDT
Harley is into bigger cahoots with the ChiComs than just selling bikes... A year or two ago there was some kind of a sell-out/technology sharing agreement by management to a Chinese company. Can't recall all the details, but from the sounds of it, top brass sold a little bit of HD up the river. Google should have something for those interested.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 6:06:19 AM EDT
I have to admint, I wouldn't mind touring China by motorcycle with a hot little Asian honey in the bitch seat.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 6:17:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BigRoost:
Why reak oir? All time reak oir!


Link Posted: 4/10/2006 6:32:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheOtherDave:
Harley is into bigger cahoots with the ChiComs than just selling bikes... A year or two ago there was some kind of a sell-out/technology sharing agreement by management to a Chinese company. Can't recall all the details, but from the sounds of it, top brass sold a little bit of HD up the river. Google should have something for those interested.



Totally off the subject, meant to be non-confrontational and to satisfy a curiosity:

Do you belong to a union? A simple yes or no will do.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 6:38:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By TheOtherDave:
Harley is into bigger cahoots with the ChiComs than just selling bikes... A year or two ago there was some kind of a sell-out/technology sharing agreement by management to a Chinese company. Can't recall all the details, but from the sounds of it, top brass sold a little bit of HD up the river. Google should have something for those interested.



Totally off the subject, meant to be non-confrontational and to satisfy a curiosity:

Do you belong to a union? A simple yes or no will do.



No, not currently-but I have in the past. Why?
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 6:56:03 AM EDT
SWEET! I can get me a HD knock off at walmart really soon!
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 7:28:12 AM EDT
Lide to riv, riv to lide! Harley Davidson goes to China.



That's the funniest damn title I've read in a long time!
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:00:30 AM EDT
They've been copying Honda for years,bout the only way to get a small(under 400 cc) enduro is to go Chinese.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:04:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
I have to admint, I wouldn't mind touring China by motorcycle with a hot little Asian honey in the bitch seat.



Malcom Forbes did it years ago. I remember an article in some bike rag with some cool pics. He shipped a few bikes over and invited a few folks along. Forbes was real Harley nut.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:06:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
Hemet raws suckee! Ret those who lide decide!


BEIJING - Hog heaven has come to China.
Harley-Davidson opened its first dealership in China yesterday, with promises to bring its trademark easy-riding attitude to bikers in the world's most sought-after market.

"All around the world, it's been synonymous with freedom, open roads, raw power and good times, and we expect the same things," said David Foley, managing director of the China division for Harley-Davidson Asia.

The small showroom sits just on the edge of the Fourth Ring Road - about a 20-minute drive from the heart of town - where farmers still push carts on the street.

Parked in the center of the store were a handful of sleek, chrome-and-leather Harley models gleaming under spotlights.

Customers posed for photos with the bikes and exclaimed how shiny they were.

After-sale services also will be offered, along with rider training and events including organized rides.


The Associated Press



www.nydailynews.com/business/story/407306p-344832c.html



Dis mos numba won!
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:11:52 AM EDT
Chinese pronounce the R as an L. It's the Japanese that often pronounce the L as R. (You gotta get this stuff right man!!)

Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:14:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Chinese pronounce the R as an L. It's the Japanese that often pronounce the L as R. (You gotta get this stuff right man!!)




Poriticarry collect srang?
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:38:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2006 9:39:13 AM EDT by MagKnightX]

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Chinese pronounce the R as an L. It's the Japanese that often pronounce the L as R. (You gotta get this stuff right man!!)




Actually, Mandarin (普通话/Pǔtōnghuà) has both an "r" and "l" phoneme. The "l" is pronounced as in English, the alveolar lateral approximant. However, the "r" is a retroflex approximant (represented as /ɻ/in IPA), and can be confused for an "l" by an ignorant listener. To pronounce it, pull your lips back, flex your tounge back so it is between the palate and the palatal/alveolar ridge, and try to say "r." See the Wikipedia article on retroflex consonants.

Cantonese, however, has no "r" phoneme at all, but Standard Mandarin is the standard spoken language of the PRC and the Cantonese dialects are dying out.

In Japanese, the "r" sound is described in the Wikipedia article on Japanese phonology:

/r/ (transcribed ɾ̠ above) is a lateral apical postalveolar flap. It is similar to the Korean r. To an English speaker's ears, its pronunciation lies somewhere between a flapped r /ɾ/ (as in American English better and ladder), an l, and a d, sounding most like d before /i/, and most like l before /o/.


Japanese has no equivalent to the "l" sound, so they use "r" or drop the sound. Likewise, there is no "v" or true "f;" "v" is replaced with "b" and "f" is pronounced as "h" (except for the mora "fu," pronounced /ɸɯ/ in IPA and with no true equivalent in English; the "f" is provided as a bilabial fricative [shape your mouth to say "wh-" as in "what," but blow harshly to make something closer to "h"] and the "u" in Japanese is like /u/ with the lips spread rather than rounded). However, this is not the strangest feature of their phonology; the most noticible is that all syllables (morae, technically) are either single vowels, a single consonant followed by a single vowel, or the nasal "n." So, to transcribe, say, "calculator," you would use the kana for the morae /ka.kyu.re.i.ta.a/. As a note, "kyu," "hyu," "ryu," etc. are possible in Japanese as palatized single consonants, just as "tsu" and "chi" are possible because the "ts-" and "ch-" sounds are really represented by one consonant. The phonology is really more complex than should be described in a simple post.

If you would like to know more about East Asian linguistics, pronunciation, accents, and how they transfer to English, I could write a full-on topic about it with a comprehensive description, but this topic is about Chinese motorcycles.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 9:38:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/10/2006 9:38:50 AM EDT by MagKnightX]
edit DAMMIT double post!
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 10:33:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
I have to admint, I wouldn't mind touring China by motorcycle with a hot little Asian honey in the bitch seat.



Malcom Forbes did it years ago. I remember an article in some bike rag with some cool pics. He shipped a few bikes over and invited a few folks along. Forbes was real Harley nut.



But Malcom Forbes probably had a Asian guy riding in his bitch seat.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 10:35:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Chinese pronounce the R as an L. It's the Japanese that often pronounce the L as R. (You gotta get this stuff right man!!)




Actually, Mandarin (普通话/Pǔtōnghuà) has both an "r" and "l" phoneme. The "l" is pronounced as in English, the alveolar lateral approximant. However, the "r" is a retroflex approximant (represented as /ɻ/in IPA), and can be confused for an "l" by an ignorant listener. To pronounce it, pull your lips back, flex your tounge back so it is between the palate and the palatal/alveolar ridge, and try to say "r." See the Wikipedia article on retroflex consonants.

Cantonese, however, has no "r" phoneme at all, but Standard Mandarin is the standard spoken language of the PRC and the Cantonese dialects are dying out.

In Japanese, the "r" sound is described in the Wikipedia article on Japanese phonology:

/r/ (transcribed ɾ̠ above) is a lateral apical postalveolar flap. It is similar to the Korean r. To an English speaker's ears, its pronunciation lies somewhere between a flapped r /ɾ/ (as in American English better and ladder), an l, and a d, sounding most like d before /i/, and most like l before /o/.


Japanese has no equivalent to the "l" sound, so they use "r" or drop the sound. Likewise, there is no "v" or true "f;" "v" is replaced with "b" and "f" is pronounced as "h" (except for the mora "fu," pronounced /ɸɯ/ in IPA and with no true equivalent in English; the "f" is provided as a bilabial fricative [shape your mouth to say "wh-" as in "what," but blow harshly to make something closer to "h"] and the "u" in Japanese is like /u/ with the lips spread rather than rounded). However, this is not the strangest feature of their phonology; the most noticible is that all syllables (morae, technically) are either single vowels, a single consonant followed by a single vowel, or the nasal "n." So, to transcribe, say, "calculator," you would use the kana for the morae /ka.kyu.re.i.ta.a/. As a note, "kyu," "hyu," "ryu," etc. are possible in Japanese as palatized single consonants, just as "tsu" and "chi" are possible because the "ts-" and "ch-" sounds are really represented by one consonant. The phonology is really more complex than should be described in a simple post.

If you would like to know more about East Asian linguistics, pronunciation, accents, and how they transfer to English, I could write a full-on topic about it with a comprehensive description, but this topic is about Chinese motorcycles.



Your nerd-fu is intense.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 10:37:45 AM EDT
I think this applies:

"I don't own a Harley or a 1911 because I don't have time to work on the motherf***ers."

H-D's: For fat, balding yuppies who dress like motorcycle gang meth dealers and child rapists and who don't mind having a shoddy bike for twice the cost of a high-quality Japanese, German, or Italian one. Flame away!
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 11:14:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Your nerd-fu is intense.



Linguistics-fu, if you please.
Link Posted: 4/10/2006 12:55:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

Originally Posted By dolanp:
Your nerd-fu is intense.



Linguistics-fu, if you please.



I always wanted to be a steech parathist.
Top Top