Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 4/8/2006 3:47:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 5:51:38 PM EDT by sherrick13]
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 3:55:35 PM EDT
more info required.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 3:58:31 PM EDT
I'm sorry, but for some reason, I can't stop laughing!



Did you take the cover off of the outlet and test the wires?

Link Posted: 4/8/2006 3:59:09 PM EDT
220------221.....Whatever ir takes
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 4:00:12 PM EDT
hey guys, I shot my rifle and it went click and doesnt work now

what's wrong?


see the problem now?
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 4:04:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
more info required.



+1 Based on the info, we can only conclude that the breaker is bad.

How old is the wiring you're working on?
Everything in the circuit is connected?
Rest of the house has power?
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 4:08:28 PM EDT
Check the wires at the connections. You might have a loose or burnt connection.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 4:21:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 4:22:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 4:24:13 PM EDT by sherrick13]
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 5:51:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 5:57:22 PM EDT
Do you have a tester? Turn the breaker on and see if any voltage is present at the terminals of the breaker.
If not, you just bought yourself a new breaker.
Also check what else you did wrong. Sounds like you grounded something that didn't want to be grounded.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 5:59:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By postpostban:
Do you have a tester? Turn the breaker on and see if any voltage is present at the terminals of the breaker.
If not, you just bought yourself a new breaker.
Also check what else you did wrong. Sounds like you grounded something that didn't want to be grounded.



+1
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:04:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 6:05:16 PM EDT by NeedMoreAmmo]
Recheck everything. Especially your receptical wiring. Is the wiring a straight run from the service panel or does it maybe have a junction box / wirenuts in the circuit (check that if it does).

+1 on the bad breaker . Dead short to ground will cook them frequently, which make it even more important to make sure you have the receptical wired properly. Also, was the breaker the proper rating?
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:20:57 PM EDT
let breaker cool, its probably got the thermal trip, turn it completly to the off position for a few minutes, then flip it back on, check to make sure you didn't wire up the outlet wrong while your waiting.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:28:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 6:28:54 PM EDT by MicronuT]
i dont thik a neutral should be in a two phase.. take that off
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:29:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 6:30:38 PM EDT by MicronuT]
after you take that off.. try and reset the breaker again.. and make fully sure its not slightly tripped... turn off and turn on again.. u do have a voltage tester i hope. +1 on testing the line side of the breaker and then the other side
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:36:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/8/2006 6:38:21 PM EDT by ar-wrench]
Are you using a 3 wire plug?

hot \ / hot
.......| neutral.

Is the pigtail properly wired to the stove?

Are you showing 220 at the outlet and 110 to neutral from each hot?

Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:42:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MicronuT:
i dont thik a neutral should be in a two phase.. take that off



Not always true . If there is a 120 volt load , such as a light or a timer , you will need a neutral .
In this case , the white wire could be connected to the GROUND . He needs to start at the breaker panel and see how that cable is connected .
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 7:41:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By djohns6:

Originally Posted By MicronuT:
i dont thik a neutral should be in a two phase.. take that off



Not always true . If there is a 120 volt load , such as a light or a timer , you will need a neutral .
In this case , the white wire could be connected to the GROUND . He needs to start at the breaker panel and see how that cable is connected .



I'm not Familar with two phase. Is that something new? Single phase 220V am.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 7:53:15 AM EDT
are you sure you didnt fry the tester? and the lines are hot
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:02:39 AM EDT
Take the plug back out of the wall. You should have 4 wires

hot..........................110v
hot..........................110v
neutral.................... 0v
Ground................... 0v

In most cases, it will be red/black/white & green

red............hot..............110v
black........hot..............110v
white........neutral........ 0v
green.......ground........ 0v

Pull all the wires off the plug and hang them out so none are touching. Turn breaker back on (you might have to turn it off with a little force and back on) and test all the wires to the green. the red and black should read 110v-120v to ground. The white wire should read 0v. Your color code may be different, but the testing should be the same. Mark the 2 -110v leads and rehook those to the top terminals of the plug (Blades) and the neutral to the bottom (post) connection. There should also be a place for the green wire.

.............it seems simple to me!
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:05:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By djohns6:

Originally Posted By MicronuT:
i dont thik a neutral should be in a two phase.. take that off



Not always true . If there is a 120 volt load , such as a light or a timer , you will need a neutral .
In this case , the white wire could be connected to the GROUND . He needs to start at the breaker panel and see how that cable is connected .



It is now code that all 230 V receptacles for residential power use be a 4-wire configuration.

Just a FYI. Not implying the poster's home is wired that way. But if it was built in the last 6 years, it'll have a 4-wire to both the range and the dryer.

+1 on you hooking it up wrong or the breaker shorting.

My money is on your hota/ground reversed, which is called a dead short. Like the other poster stated, the vericle receptacle terminal is the grounded prong location. Shut the breaker off, remove the receptacle, and check your wiring.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:09:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Neolock:

Originally Posted By djohns6:

Originally Posted By MicronuT:
i dont thik a neutral should be in a two phase.. take that off



Not always true . If there is a 120 volt load , such as a light or a timer , you will need a neutral .
In this case , the white wire could be connected to the GROUND . He needs to start at the breaker panel and see how that cable is connected .



I'm not Familar with two phase. Is that something new? Single phase 220V am.



Well, it is technically "two phase" but that isn't the term used since there is only single and three phase. Three phase has each leg 120 degrees apart, 220 has two legs, each 180 degrees off.

220 is a single tap off the main. The "magic" is in the transformer with the center tap.

Back to the subject, what kind of "tester" was being used? A simple DVM set to 600V has nearly infinite impedence so if it sparked, something was wrong. Check to see if there are any splices in the wire that could be the cause of the problem. Also, the breaker might need to be fully tripped before it can be reset.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:14:45 AM EDT

The OP only mentioned three wires . Now I'm not sure if the red/black/white wires were in the box or in the stove pigtail . The new stove stove should have four wires . I'm curious how this one turns out .
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:18:03 AM EDT

Never mind . I reread the post . The colored wires were in the box . I still think he needs to check the wiring in the breaker panel . Sounds like a "hot" is grounded all right .
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:22:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By djohns6:
The OP only mentioned three wires . Now I'm not sure if the red/black/white wires were in the box or in the stove pigtail . The new stove stove should have four wires . I'm curious how this one turns out .



If he has a factory colored red and black hot, he has a 4-wire hookup. In 3-wire applications, the white wire, normally used as the neutral, is taped a different color per code to reflect being used as a hot wire. But many times the sparky doesn't tape it and simply leaves a white wire as hot.

They never, to my knowledge, made a red/black/bare or green combination. If he has red and black, it's either taped or he has a 4-wire connection. My money is on taped.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:23:09 AM EDT
It sounds like the tester needs to be checked on an known hot before he proceeds. I have seen guys test circuits with a tic tracer with a dead battery and then get bit because they didn't verify the proper function of their test equipment.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 8:32:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dalesimpson:
It sounds like the tester needs to be checked on an known hot before he proceeds. I have seen guys test circuits with a tic tracer with a dead battery and then get bit because they didn't verify the proper function of their test equipment.



Yep, seen that, too.

Small thread hijack for a true story.

Sparky one tells apprentice to open the breaker.

Apprentice retorts with, "OK, it's open."

A few minutes go by, and this child-like scream followed by a deep, long moan erupts. "I told you to open the breaker!!!!!!!!!!"

"I did," the apprentice says. "Turned it off to close it, and then turned it back on to open it again."



I thought he was going to deliver a beat down to that poor kid. He was so mad he threw his screwdriver as hard as he could and it went into the opposite kitchen wall like a throwing knife.

I told him, "Dude, you know to always turn your OWN power off and on. I'm taking the sheetrock patch out of your check."

He looks at me and goes, "I'm sorry, Richard. But I'm going home after stopping for a case [of beer]."

And he did exactly that. Getting hit with 220 sucks, but I still think he just got hit with a single leg and wanted the day off. I never did charge him for the sheetrock repair, either.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 9:06:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dalesimpson:
It sounds like the tester needs to be checked on an known hot before he proceeds. I have seen guys test circuits with a tic tracer with a dead battery and then get bit because they didn't verify the proper function of their test equipment.



Actually one of the "guys" that I saw get bit because he didn't verify the correct operation of his test equipment was me. Lesson learned.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:13:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 10:47:10 AM EDT

Three wires , eh ? Keep going ------ You checked how it was connected in the panel , and ?---
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:11:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:45:12 PM EDT

I never saw a " matching transformer " with a Delta or Wye secondary . They are used in Electronics or antenna applications . Rethink your question .
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 2:52:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sherrick13:
I installed the receptacle and when I tried to test it with a tester it sparked. Now the wires have no power. The breaker is not tripped.



No power BUT the breaker never tripped??? The only thing i can think of is the power is not even going through the breaker either! you might have to reattach the hot wire back into the breaker then test it first to see if it has power then reattach the new receptacle later to see if it also gets the juice. For it to spark and then go dead means a short but for it not to trip the box? weird. Check the wiring from outside all the way to the box and that particaular breaker looking for old or shorted wires then make absolutely sure you reconnect the new wires properly. and they are not melted somewhere. If you HAVE power in the breaker but still no power in the recepticle and the breaker is NOT tripped off the it is'nt a short, the hot wire must be severed somewhere between the breaker box and the outlet but not causing a short or else the breaker would trip.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 3:12:11 PM EDT
I once plugged in a dryer that had both hot legs tied in together. Not only tripped the breaker, but according to the power company, blew the transformer at the street!


Back to this question ...... are you sure the range is wired right or did the power go out before you ever had a chance to plug in the stove?



Travis
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 3:25:30 PM EDT
Take it back out of the box and look at the wires. A 220-240v receptacle has 2 hot wires. These are the 2 brass colored terminals on the receptacle (black and white wires). The silver colored terminal is for the ground wire (bare wire or green wire). A test light SHOULD NOT trip a breaker so something is definitely FUBAR.

Start all over again, checking for proper hookup at the breaker box first. Black wire on one terminal of the breaker, white wire on the other terminal of the breaker, bare or green wire on one of the ground bus terminals.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 3:27:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sherrick13:
Ok, old stove was hard wired. I cut the breaker. Take out the old stove. Unhook wires. Hook up 220 receptacle. Red wire hot. Black wire hot. White wire neutral. Turn breaker on. There is a spark. No power. Check breaker and it is tripped. Reset breaker and no power at all. Turn off breaker and come post question.



There is no neutral on a 220-240v circuit. The 2 hot wires act as each other's neutrals.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 3:34:05 PM EDT
There is only way to be sure, Lick the wires, then let us know what happens, we can help you more after we know.......
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 3:57:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Arkansas_Rocketman:

Originally Posted By sherrick13:
Ok, old stove was hard wired. I cut the breaker. Take out the old stove. Unhook wires. Hook up 220 receptacle. Red wire hot. Black wire hot. White wire neutral. Turn breaker on. There is a spark. No power. Check breaker and it is tripped. Reset breaker and no power at all. Turn off breaker and come post question.



There is no neutral on a 220-240v circuit. The 2 hot wires act as each other's neutrals.



Buy any new 240 volt appliance and you will find a 4 wire connection . Two hots , a ground and a NEUTRAL . Your statement is correct for a purely 240 volt load such as a motor or heater .
Top Top