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Posted: 4/7/2006 8:41:58 AM EDT
Soo... the Family Guy Y2K-episode is one over here and since this is ARFcom someone got to know.

Are there any satellite images of nuclear testing available somewhere?
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:43:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 8:47:28 AM EDT by Dino]
www.isis-online.org/publications/southasia/satindex.html

satellite images of pakistan's nuke tests


eta: sorry misunderstood

I have never seen pics of an actual nuclear explosion from a satellite.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:46:02 AM EDT
that's cool, but i'd like to see mushroom cloud/fireball pics.

i dont think they exist. testing was moved underground by the time satellites developed the ability to take respectable pics
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:48:38 AM EDT
Of course, didn't you see the BSG miniseries?
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 8:52:05 AM EDT
I don't know if they're available, I kinda doubt it.

Alot of that type of stuff is done outside the visible spectrum. IR, radiation, etc. would be where I would be looking rather than trying to find a mushroom cloud.

So even if they are available, it might just be a bunch of graphs or numbers.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:17:01 PM EDT
Yes it is possible.

Vela

Vela (satellite)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from United States Nuclear Detonation Detection System)
Jump to: navigation, search
Vela was the name of a group of satellites developed as the Vela Hotel element of Project Vela by the United States to monitor compliance with the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty by the Soviet Union, and other nuclear-capable states. It means vigil or "watch" in Spanish.

(my note: vela in spanish means "candle.")

Vela-5A/B Satellite in Clean Room. (the two satellites, A and B, are separated after launch)Vela started out as a small budget research program in 1959. It ended 26 years later as a successful, cost-effective space system. In the 1970s, the nuclear detection mission was taken over by the Defense Support Program (DSP) system, and in the late 1980s, by the Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. The program is now called the Integrated Operational Nuclear Detection System (IONDS).

The total number of satellites built was 12 — six of the Vela Hotel design, and six of the Advanced Vela design. The Vela Hotel series was to detect nuclear explosions in space, while the Advanced Vela series was to detect not only nuclear explosions in space but also in the atmosphere.

All spacecraft were manufactured by TRW and launched in pairs, either on a Atlas-Agena or Titan III-C boosters, and placed in 63,000 to 70,000 mile orbits, well above the Van Allen radiation belts. The first Vela Hotel pair was launched in 1963, three days after the Test Ban Treaty was signed, and the last in 1965. They had a design life of six months, but were actually shut down after five years. Advanced Vela pairs were launched in 1967, 1969 and 1970. They had a nominal design life of 18 months, later changed to 7 years. However, the last satellite to be shut down was Vehicle 9 in 1984, which had been launched in 1969 and had lasted nearly 15 years.

The original Vela satellites were equipped with 12 external X-ray detectors and 18 internal neutron and gamma-ray detectors. They were equipped with solar panels generating 90 watts.

The Advanced Vela satellites were additionally equipped with two non-imaging silicon photodiode sensors called bhangmeters which monitored light levels over sub-millisecond intervals. They could determine the location of a nuclear explosion to within about 3,000 miles. Atmospheric nuclear explosions produce a unique signature: a short and intense flash lasting around 1 millisecond, followed by a second much more prolonged and less intense emission of light taking a fraction of a second to several seconds to build up. The effect occurs because the surface of the early fireball is quickly overtaken by the expanding atmospheric shock wave composed of ionised gas. Although it emits a considerable amount of light itself it is opaque and prevents the far brighter fireball from shining through. As the shock wave expands, so the amount of light it emits increases with its surface area. No natural phenomenon is known to produce this signature.

They were also equipped with sensors which could detect the electromagnetic pulse from an atmospheric explosion.

Additional power was required for these instruments, and these larger satellites consumed 120 watts generated from solar panels.

Serendipitously, the Vela satellites were the first devices ever to detect Gamma ray bursts.

Some controversy still surrounds the Vela program since on 22 September 1979 the Vela 6911 satellite detected the characteristic double flash of an atmospheric nuclear explosion. Still unsatisfactorily explained, this event has become known as the Vela Incident.



Includes material from NASA Goddard's Remote Sensing Tutorial

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vela_%28satellite%29"
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:28:27 PM EDT
If you believe that they can read the numbers on a license plate it stands to reason that you could also see a nuke blast.

Go to Google Earth and look at a variety of places and then decide.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:40:09 PM EDT
This has footage of a nuke detonated in space, and a whole lot more.

www.lifelibertyetc.com/product.aspx?pid=39

And the owner of the site is a member here
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:45:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By raven:
This has footage of a nuke detonated in space, and a whole lot more.

www.lifelibertyetc.com/product.aspx?pid=39

And the owner of the site is a member here



I ain't paying $22 plus shipping for a stock footage DVD.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:47:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

Originally Posted By raven:
This has footage of a nuke detonated in space, and a whole lot more.

www.lifelibertyetc.com/product.aspx?pid=39

And the owner of the site is a member here



I ain't paying $22 plus shipping for a stock footage DVD.



The premium reflects the Shatner factor.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 7:48:04 PM EDT
Of course you can see a nuclear blast from space, why do you think the sightings of these guys have increased dramatically since the nuclear age began?...... They have come to see what we're up to.....
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