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Posted: 4/4/2006 12:50:40 PM EDT
What's your favorite healthy meal to eat?

I've tried dieting before but hate eating a lot of healthy crap. 99% of the healthy crap I've tried has tasted like garbage, so I've never really stuck to a diet.

Today, however, I had an absolutely amazing lunchtime meal. I saw some other kid eat it so I gave it a shot myself.

1 grilled boneless chicken breast
1 very small dollop of salad dressing
a shitload of lettuce, cucumbers, carrots, and peppers

That was a goddamn tasty meal right there. I can see myself eating one of those for lunch and one for dinner and losing a good chunk of weight by sticking to this healthy meal!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:52:06 PM EDT
Steamed Broccoli
Chicken breast
Salad with fat-free Italian (tastes almost exactly like regular italian)
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:53:35 PM EDT
Nope, my doctor said: if it taste good, spit it out !
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:53:48 PM EDT
Not a meal, but I love uncooked peas fresh from the garden and raw carrots too.

To me the fresher the food, the better it is for you.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:54:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigthicket:
Nope, my doctor said: if it taste good, spit it out !



Isn't that the truth! That's why I'm so shocked this tasted so good. Healthy and tasty hardly mix.

Eating this alone will do wonders for my weight.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:55:14 PM EDT
Ice cold water. Fills you up good.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:55:19 PM EDT
Those nature valley granola bars.


Fucking tasty
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:55:30 PM EDT
Carrots, with or without ranch dressing!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:56:14 PM EDT
Steamed Brocolli!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:56:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:57:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:

Originally Posted By bigthicket:
Nope, my doctor said: if it taste good, spit it out !



Isn't that the truth! That's why I'm so shocked this tasted so good. Healthy and tasty hardly mix.

Eating this alone will do wonders for my weight.



There's no wonder drug or super healthy meal that will take, and keep, weight off.

Exercise and small, balanced portions will do this the most effectively while still giving you energy to function everyday.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:57:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:58:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 1:01:35 PM EDT by mousehunter]
I do not buy into the myth that low fat is healthy. As such, hormone free, grass fed steak (beef) or BBQ pork butt (free range wild hog).

That Tofu stuff is far more dangerious. Do some research into the hormones present in soybeans.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:59:49 PM EDT
Fresh rainbow trout or salmon cooked in foil with a squeeze of lemon juice and a nice crispy salad dressed in extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:03:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tyman:
Steamed Broccoli
Chicken breast
Salad with fat-free Italian (tastes almost exactly like regular italian)



That's a big +1
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:03:26 PM EDT
Sushi
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:10:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:12:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mousehunter:
I do not buy into the myth that low fat is healthy. As such, hormone free, grass fed steak (beef) or BBQ pork butt (free range wild hog).

That Tofu stuff is far more dangerious. Do some research into the hormones present in soybeans.



I agree on the low fat BS and the hormones. I eat 5 small meals a day. Usually the following:
Steak
hamburger
chicken
salads
red potatos
You never get hungary, plus it helps if you have your last meal of the day at least 4 hours before you hit the sack.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:14:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mousehunter:
I do not buy into the myth that low fat is healthy. As such, hormone free, grass fed steak (beef) or BBQ pork butt (free range wild hog).

That Tofu stuff is far more dangerious. Do some research into the hormones present in soybeans.




abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=health&id=4050646

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:14:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lordtrader:

Originally Posted By Sd_Kfz_182:
Sushi



Oh yeah that's good too. Aside from the carb content. But I guess every once in a while a spike in glucose is not bad.



Eat sashimi instead...maybe a few carbs from the pickled ginger, but no rice....anyway, I hate nori...
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:17:51 PM EDT
I have issues with a lot of what is being touted as healthy here. I have worked in the chicken industry. Commercially raised chickens are fed antiboitics to keep diesease from destroy the flocks (I worked in small chicken houses - only 10,000 birds per house, I also worked construction and built 120,000 bird houses). They are also fed pestiside so that flys are not a problem (their feces will kill the flys - think about it).

I think we are way too worried about a few grams of fat, and miss the big picture when it comes to chemicals.

The human diet has changed way too much over the last hundred years or so. weather we evolved or were created - I do not think our body is designed or adapted to deal with the junk we are currently putting into it.

I think the first step to a healthy diet is to remove everything that is artificial - be it artifical fat, preservitives, sweetener, etc...

(tinhat)Think about who profits from a low fat diet. Grain products have highest markup of any processed food I know of. But to increase the profit margen we have added preservitive to increase shelf life and cut down on spoilage - yep that got to be healthy for me.(/tinhat)
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:21:51 PM EDT
beer
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:22:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pzjgr:

Originally Posted By lordtrader:

Originally Posted By Sd_Kfz_182:
Sushi



Oh yeah that's good too. Aside from the carb content. But I guess every once in a while a spike in glucose is not bad.



Eat sashimi instead...maybe a few carbs from the pickled ginger, but no rice....anyway, I hate nori...



Well I usually eat a combination of Sushi, Sashimi and Maki, but yeah I kind of like the Rolls better.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:24:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 1:46:08 PM EDT by mousehunter]

Originally Posted By tyman:

abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=health&id=4050646




If it was good enough for the last 250+ generations, I will stick with it. Can not be all that toxic if they managed to reproduce. When we have several hundred generations of tofu eaters, I might start trusting it as well.

Oh well, vegetarians at AR15.com. It is so very depressing. I think I will go back to religious forum and sulk.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:31:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mousehunter:
When we have several hundred generations of tofu eaters, I might start trusting it as well.




they're called Chinese people.....
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:32:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 1:33:58 PM EDT by Q3131A]
Yon Woon Sen
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:36:57 PM EDT
I guesss I'm the only one who likes PIE
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:39:31 PM EDT
Mens Fitness Magazine just published a list of the TOP 20 foods men should eat. The list was compiled from feedback by 40 of the nations top nutritionist, dietitians, college nutrition professors, etc... I'm happy to say that most of these items are part of my regular diet.

Salmon, Blueberries, Oatmeal, Tomatoes, Broccoli, Spinach, Yogurt, Almonds, WHOLE Wheat Bread, Beef, Soy, Sweet Potatoes, Water, Milk, Eggs, Green Tea, Black Beans, Quinoa, Olive Oil, Turkey Breast.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:40:23 PM EDT
Onion Rings.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:42:39 PM EDT
Vegan Broccoli Quesadillas

Chop up onions and broccoli, about twice as much broccoli as onions. Sautee the onions in olive oil until they start getting translucent. Throw in the broccoli, sautee mixture until broccoli just starts to soften (you want it kind of crunchy still, at least that's the way I like it). Grate a couple of carrots and mix in. Mix in Spices in liberal doses: Adobo powder, cumin, chili powder and cilantro, especially fresh cilantro. Mix it until done to your satisfaction.

Fry a tortilla (or two) until slightly crispy. Grate vegan cheddar or monterey jack cheese (substitute real cheese if you must) on tortilla, put broccoli and stuf on it, grate more cheese on top, cover with tortilla. Microwave for a few minutes. Great with salsa on top.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:43:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:43:29 PM EDT
Tomatoes, asparagus, cucumbers, lettuce, black olives, green peppers, tons of onions, mushrooms.

It's ALL good! Oh yea, and a good can of solid white tuna in water.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:49:30 PM EDT
Italian Baked Tofu and shredded cabbage with a bit of garlic dressing
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:50:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 1:52:23 PM EDT by warlord]
Hot dogs

Try growing some of it yourself. The fresher the veggies the less need for various fat-laden dressings. There is a big difference in taste from garden rippened veggies and fruits. The first time I tasted home-grown tomatoes, I was shocked at home much better it tasted.

Try growing some of your own fruits and veggies, it isn't that hard, but taste wise way ahead of anything you can buy at the supermarket. The fruits and veggies are actually picked grew and artifically treated to look ripe, in essence you are eating unripe fruits and veggies so no wonder it tastes lousy.

For you folks who like to eat beef, get USDA select rather than choice, because there is a lot less marbling in the meat, so therefore a little more healthier, but you have to cook it exactly right otherwise it will taste lousy becaue fat contributes to the tenderness and flavor of the meat.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:56:20 PM EDT

Healthy Food You Enjoy Eating That Tastes Good?


Personal consumption:

Honey Dew melons (a dozen a week),
Cantaloupe melons (a dozen a week),
A least a dozen navel oranges,
A least a dozen delicious apples a week,

There are others items but those above I insist on being available throughout the week.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:00:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:01:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lordtrader:

Originally Posted By The_Sgt_Rock:
Quinoa



What in the world is that.



A whole grain.

Why Eat It

Nutritionally, quinoa might be considered a supergrain--although it is not really a grain, but the seed of a leafy plant that's distantly related to spinach. Quinoa has excellent reserves of protein, and unlike other grains, is not missing the amino aicd lysine, so the protein is more complete (a trait it shares with other "non-true" grains such as buckwheat and amaranth). The World Health Organization has rated the quality of protein in quinoa at least equivalent to that in milk. Quinoa offers more iron than other grains and contains high levels of potassium and riboflavin, as well as other B vitamins: B6, niacin, and thiamin. It is also a good source of magnesium, zinc, copper, and manganese, and has some folate (folic acid).

An ancient grainlike product that has recently been "rediscovered" in this country, quinoa has a light, delicate taste, and can be substituted for almost any other grain.

Though quinoa is a recent addition to the North American larder, this crop, native to the Andes, sustained the ancient Incas, and has been cultivated continuously for more than 5,000 years. Quinoa thrives in poor soil, arid climates, and mountainous altitudes. Today, most quinoa is imported from South America, although it is being cultivated on the high slopes of the Colorado Rockies.

Quinoa grains are about the same size as millet, but flattened, with a pointed, oval shape. The color ranges from pale yellow through red and brown to black. Quinoa cooks quickly to a light, fluffy texture. As it cooks, the external germ, which forms a band around each grain, spirals out, forming a tiny crescent-shaped "tail," similar to a bean sprout. Although the grain itself is soft and creamy, the tail is crunchy, providing a unique texture to complement quinoa's delicate flavor.

Availability

Since this grain is still a relatively new one, at least to the American market, you're most likely to find it in health-food and specialty stores. Large supermarkets often stock quinoa, too.

Shopping

Quinoa is more expensive than most grains. However, during cooking, it increases about three to four times in volume, so you get reasonable value for your money.

Storage

Store quinoa like other grains, in a tightly closed container in a cool, dry place.

Preparation

Quinoa's survival through the millennia may be attributed to the resinous, bitter coating that protects its seeds from birds and insects--and also shields them from the intense high-altitude sunlight. This coating, called saponin, is soapy and must be removed in a strong alkaline solution to make the grain palatable. Most quinoa sold in this country has already been cleansed of its saponin. But quinoa should be rinsed thoroughly before cooking to remove any powdery residue of saponin. Place the grain in a fine strainer and hold it under cold running water until the water runs clear; drain well.

Toast the grain in a dry skillet for five minutes before cooking to give it a delicious roasted flavor. To cook, use two parts liquid to one part quinoa. Combine the liquid and toasted quinoa in a medium saucepan, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook until the grains are translucent and the germ has spiraled out from each grain, about 15 minutes.

To make a quinoa pilaf, begin by sauteing chopped onion and garlic in a little oil. Add toasted quinoa and liquid (two parts water to one part quinoa) and simmer as described above. After the pilaf is cooked, you can stir in other ingredients such as toasted nuts, dried fruit, shredded greens or fresh herbs, or cheese.

Nutrition Chart

Quinoa/1/2 cup dry

Calories 318
Total fat (g) 4.9
Saturated fat (g) 0.5
Monounsaturated fat (g) 1.3
Polyunsaturated fat (g) 2
Dietary fiber (g) 5
Protein (g) 11
Carbohydrate (g) 59
Cholesterol (mg) 0
Sodium (mg) 18
Riboflavin (mg) 0.3
Vitamin E (mg) 4.1
Copper (mg) 0.7
Iron (mg) 7.9
Magnesium (mg) 179
Manganese (mg) 1.9
Phosphorus (mg) 349
Potassium (mg) 629
Zinc (mg) 2.8



Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:02:00 PM EDT
+1 on salmon

or any fish actually
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:05:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Madis:
+1 on salmon

or any fish actually


Welcome!

From what I understand only certain fish is good for you. Some fish has high amounts of mercury and cadmium, and the USFDA recommends limited consumption of these. Also farm raised salmon is not as good for as wild salmon. Farmed raised salmon is actually grey, so the farmers dye the flesh orange.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:05:22 PM EDT
I like chicken and fish,grilling always adds something.
find the best local place for the highest quallity fruits and veggies. Likely will not be the supermarket,and likely will cost you a bit more but haveing a bunch of tasty high quality stuff around will help you.
if you live alone don't even brindg the junk stuff home (ice creme,chips ,baked stuff).
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:06:54 PM EDT
Plain yougurt with milled flax seed mixed in. Very tasty and good for you to boot
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:27:11 PM EDT
Grilled chicken breast, or grilled salmon, with yellow rice, fordhook lima beans, fresh sliced tomatos, and cucumbers(from the garden), and green onions on the side. My favorite summer time meal. With a big glass of ice water. Substitute beer of choice as needed, and as needed as I define it, outside temp. above 75deg .
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:34:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By al_bundy:
Plain yougurt with milled flax seed mixed in. Very tasty and good for you to boot



Yep....tasty. And Flax Seed is high in Omega-3 oils for those of you who hate fish.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:14:04 PM EDT
I like alot of vegetables. Prepared properly they are extremely tasty and good for you.

Steamed brocoli / cauliflower

Green beans ( just had them last night )

Fresh salad w/ alot of extras: boiled eggs / red onions / peppers / mushrooms etc ( the low cal trick is to have a seperate dish for tha dressing & dip your fork into it prior to each bite ) Alot less dressing calories consumed and surprisingly near same taste because its the fork that actually contacts your lips & tongue.

I like skinless chicken breast BBQ on the grill

I live in the NW so salmon / halibut are very healthy options also

usually red meat ( steak - pot roast - ribs ) maybe once every week

My one weekness is BLT sandwiches w/ farm fresh juicy ripe tomatoes and quality thick bacon with cold crisp - fresh iceberg lettuce on hot toasted fresh sourdough bread mmmmmmm
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:16:39 PM EDT
Pho!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:20:43 PM EDT

Veggie subway sandwich. Heck, there is so little meat on their sandwiches, you don't miss it.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:23:59 PM EDT
grilled trout and sea bass
sashimi
steamed broccoli
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:28:09 PM EDT
Bananas
Cantalopes
Garden fresh peas
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:40:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 3:47:17 PM EDT by MlTCHELL]
Ever since I went to the doctor and he told me I was "underweight"... I pretty much always eat until I can't eat any more.

I worked two years at a pizza place, ate as much pizza as I could (usually one medium pizza with all meat toppings) four days a week, for two years... and I don't think I gained more than 10lbs and I probably grew 2" in that time period. Pizza is healthy... tomatoes, dairy, grains... what else does it need?

I'm going to go get the carmel ice cream I bought.

ETA: Nevermind... the freezer was too cold and I only got four small bites chipped out before I bent my spoon.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:45:51 PM EDT
Another vote for Salmon! Put a salmon steak in a glass dish with some lemon juice, lemon pepper, a touch of cumin, and a little corriander, and broil for a little bit on each side. Served with some brown rice and steamed broccoli.


I had thought that only fish had this omega 3 fatty acids (or whatever that healthy fat is) but read recently that beef is supposed to have it to. Problem is, most cattle aren't fed the foods they are supposed to eat, so they don't have the full nutritional value they should. The more I learn about this stuff, the more I'm starting to lean towards organic/small farm for as much of my groceries as I can.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:49:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MlTCHELL:
Ever since I went to the doctor and he told me I was "underweight"... I pretty much always eat until I can't eat any more.

I worked two years at a pizza place, ate as much pizza as I could (usually one medium pizza with all meat toppings) four days a week, for two years... and I don't think I gained more than 10lbs and I probably grew 2" in that time period. Pizza is healthy... tomatoes, dairy, grains... what else does it need?

I'm going to go get the carmel ice cream I bought.



I was like that. The only way I could gain was if I lifted weights and ate about every 2-3 hours, and all clean, healthy foods, in a high protein diet. Then I quit, was only eating two big meals a day, drank lots of beer, ate fast food, bar food, etc., and quit doing any exercise- after a year or so of that, I effectively killed my metabolism. Now I'm trying to clean up again.
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