Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 4/4/2006 10:26:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 1:17:40 PM EDT by 2A373]
Here are some pictures I took March 24th when I got to tour the DMZ.


The huge flag (30 meters long) that is flown over the NK Propaganda Village.



View of Conferance Row. The light blue buildings are controlled by the South and the gray ones by the North.




ROK Army Guards - you don't mess with these guys!




Looked like they were carrying M9s. Daewoo K5 - thanks for the info yobo



The concrete strip is the border. Picture was taking from the north side of the border.



ROK Army Guards keeping watch on the North.




North Korean Guards watching us.






View from CP 5 of CP 4 and the scene of the Panmunjom Axe Murder Incident.



All these are pictures of the North taken from CP 5. Notice the lack of trees once past the DMZ border, this is because they have all been cut down and used for heat.





View of Propaganda Village from CP 5.



The large tower in this picture is one of many that the North uses to jam radio and TV signals coming from the South.



Memorial dedicated to the soldiers that died during the Axe Murder Incident. '



View of CP 5 from CP 4.



The Bridge of No Return.



Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:31:14 AM EDT
Wow...cool shit!

My buddy was stationed there a few times...kind of a creepy/scary place to be from what I understand. A lot of tension, and a lot of shit that happens that no one hears about...
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:31:45 AM EDT
cool pics! a buddy of mine did a tour of the DMZ, and he said there is some spooky shit going on there. basically the north is super paranoid, and the south is super hardcore.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:31:59 AM EDT
Tag
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:33:10 AM EDT
cool

can i ask wha you were doing there?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:33:17 AM EDT
There's no place like home...There's no place like home...
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:36:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
cool

can i ask wha you were doing there?



I'm active duty AF and just got back April 1st from doing a one year tour at Kunsan AB, ROK.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:37:33 AM EDT
At first I thought they were standing there staring at the wall.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:37:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
There's no place like home...There's no place like home...




You got that right!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:41:36 AM EDT
Welcome back
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:42:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
At first I thought they were standing there staring at the wall.



They stand so that only half of their body is exposed, makes for less of a target.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:45:24 AM EDT


That place doesn't change much.

I've seen pics posted here before by other members that look like copies.


Someone should put a few APIT through that flag.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:46:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 2A373:

Originally Posted By Brohawk:
There's no place like home...There's no place like home...




You got that right!



Amen!...Great photos!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:47:01 AM EDT
Is that a UN flag in one pic?

Whew!!! now I would feel safer...
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:50:44 AM EDT
Those ROK pistols are not M9. Those are Daewoo 9mm pistols... same as DP-51 9mm pistols that were imported in the 90's.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:55:38 AM EDT
Great pics; I never get tired of seeing pics of that place. I did not realize there were no trees on the NK side. Makes sense I guess. What a hell of a way to live.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:59:15 AM EDT
Thanks for the pics!

My God, those ROK guards look like mannequins standing there! \

And that's a huge f'n flag!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:11:55 AM EDT
wow....cool photos, what a tense place that must be!

Thanks for sharing the pics
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:16:28 AM EDT
is that the ROK position of attention or parade rest? do they stand like that all the time (british palace guards) or was that just for show?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:20:36 AM EDT
Great pics.

Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:21:50 AM EDT
The Korean War was fought under the UN.

That is why all the South's building's a blue- the UN colors and they are enforcing a UN created demilitarized zone.

It's one big ceasefire since 1953

CRC
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:23:44 AM EDT
Brings back some memories. I spent a month staring at propaganda villiage over the reciever of an M2 while I was on GP Collier.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:25:33 AM EDT
Very cool!
Thanks for the interesting pics!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:38:54 AM EDT
You know what it reminds me of?

MERCENARIES, the XBox game.

Man, those programmers did their homework. I finished the game a long time ago, but now I think I'm going to break it out again.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:42:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 11:45:00 AM EDT by MagKnightX]
Beautiful. I'll have to visit the South sometime.

And maybe, if things are lucky, we can visit the North, or it'll all just be the Republic of Korea by then.

ETA: When you say "pictures were taken from the north side of the border," does that mean you made an illegal crossing into the North, or does that mean you were in the DMZ but beyond the South or something? 'Cause it seems if you illegally crossed into the North, you would have been shot by the NorKors.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 11:43:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:

And maybe, if things are lucky, we can visit the North, or it'll all just be the Republic of Korea by then.



Don't hold your breath... I'm not.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:23:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 12:39:14 PM EDT
Very cool!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:14:11 PM EDT
I was in the 2/17th F.A. Camp Pelham S.Korea when Cpt Bonifas and 1Lt Barrett were killed there. My battallion section chief was a good friend of Cpt Bonifas and went through West Point with him.

It was a tense time and almost resulted in the resumption of hostilities there in Korea. I've seen almost all of those places in the pictures during my two tours there, 75-76 and 78-79. Have walked many patrols in the DMZ as an FO and carrying a PRC-77.

I still have the copy of CHORUS with the pictures on the front page and the story inside stashed in my old footlocker with all my pictures and memorabillia.

I remeber the night we moved out to our field positions, I grabbed every unused flack jacket out of the supply room that I could find and spread them over the fuel tanks and engine compartment of our vehicles to protect them from airbursts so we could unass the area if needed. I remember sitting with a TA-312 phone to my ear in the battallion FDC, connected to the gun batteries who were layed on targets and rounds in the tubes, ready to fire. The firepower that massed along the DMZ was amazing. I never saw so many tanks, APCs, artillery pieces, mortars. The ground was rumbling everywhere with the sound of tracked vehicles heading north to the Z.
The morning that the tree was cut down, the sky was full of helicopters and jets. What a sight it was.

Thanks for bringing back the memories.....those were some of the best days of my life.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:19:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By yobo:
Those ROK pistols are not M9. Those are Daewoo 9mm pistols... same as DP-51 9mm pistols that were imported in the 90's.



Thanks for the info.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:19:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:21:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tommygun2000:
I was in the 2/17th F.A. Camp Pelham S.Korea when Cpt Bonifas and 1Lt Barrett were killed there. My battallion section chief was a good friend of Cpt Bonifas and went through West Point with him.

It was a tense time and almost resulted in the resumption of hostilities there in Korea. I've seen almost all of those places in the pictures during my two tours there, 75-76 and 78-79. Have walked many patrols in the DMZ as an FO and carrying a PRC-77.

I still have the copy of CHORUS with the pictures on the front page and the story inside stashed in my old footlocker with all my pictures and memorabillia.

I remeber the night we moved out to our field positions, I grabbed every unused flack jacket out of the supply room that I could find and spread them over the fuel tanks and engine compartment of our vehicles to protect them from airbursts so we could unass the area if needed. I remember sitting with a TA-312 phone to my ear in the battallion FDC, connected to the gun batteries who were layed on targets and rounds in the tubes, ready to fire. The firepower that massed along the DMZ was amazing. I never saw so many tanks, APCs, artillery pieces, mortars. The ground was rumbling everywhere with the sound of tracked vehicles heading north to the Z.
The morning that the tree was cut down, the sky was full of helicopters and jets. What a sight it was.

Thanks for bringing back the memories.....those were some of the best days of my life.



Damn, I bet the pucker level was off the scale then.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:30:29 PM EDT
TimJ,


Man you brought back some memories. I was with the JSA for 97 thru 98.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:36:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 2A373: All these are pictures of the North taken from CP 5. Notice the lack of trees once past the DMZ border, this is because they have all been cut down and used for heat.
It was nice of the North Koreans to clear the brush so that our guided weapons will work better.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:37:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 2A373:

Originally Posted By Cleatus:
cool

can i ask wha you were doing there?



I'm active duty AF and just got back April 1st from doing a one year tour at Kunsan AB, ROK.



Bring back any juicy girls from a-town? lol
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:46:08 PM EDT
As an American of Korean decent, let me first say thank you. Second, dont believe the liberal propaganda of the media. Most Koreans like Americans and are grateful for our presence. Of course there are the few that are vocal. No different then the libtard trash that live here.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:53:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:
As an American of Korean decent, let me first say thank you. Second, dont believe the liberal propaganda of the media. Most Koreans like Americans and are grateful for our presence. Of course there are the few that are vocal. No different then the libtard trash that live here.




With the exception of the students that occasionally protested at the gates, i saw no problems. I have traveled from Kunsan to Seoul by foot and train with friends with hardly a second look from the natives.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 1:57:15 PM EDT
I did 3 tours in Korea with the 2nd MP Company at Camp Casey. We had a grunt toss a grenade into the MP station and blow off part of the roof and front entrance. The troops were pretty fired up after being in the field for months at a time. Had a racial shooting at the M16 range where a black soldier stood up and open fire on several other soldiers killing them. Another soldier stole an M60 machine gun and two ammo cans trying to start something with North Korea. He didn't make it. Still another soldier defected to North Korea and was found dead in a river near the DMZ and dozens of other interesting incidents while serving there.

One of the first movie screenplays I wrote called The 38th Parallel, a military thriller set in Korea, is currently being read by two "A" list actors and several production companies. Asia's top actress signed to star in it.

Another military script called DMZ, about the killing of Cpt Bonifas and 1Lt Barrett is almost completed. Several actors are interested in those roles. So, hopefully there will be a couple more military flicks hitting the theaters early next year.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:00:26 PM EDT
Anyone ever mooned the north koreans?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:11:35 PM EDT
I spent a year with HHC 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division from Mar 91 - Mar 92. I only went to the DMZ once but it made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. I'd bet if you blinfolded me and took me there today I'd be able to tell you where I was, you can cut the tension with a knife up there.

Strangely I can only remember about six months of that year.....too much Soju I guess
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:16:26 PM EDT
I get the overwhelming impression that the ROK Guards could kick my butt from here to kingdom come without even breaking a sweat.

Of course, I don't claim to be that tough anyway, but you know what I mean.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:16:50 PM EDT
Thanks for the great pics. I was scheduled to do the tour on Sept 12 2001. Needless to say, I didn't make it.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:29:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 2:30:39 PM EDT by tommygun2000]

Originally Posted By VanekSF1:
I did 3 tours in Korea with the 2nd MP Company at Camp Casey. We had a grunt toss a grenade into the MP station and blow off part of the roof and front entrance. The troops were pretty fired up after being in the field for months at a time. Had a racial shooting at the M16 range where a black soldier stood up and open fire on several other soldiers killing them. Another soldier stole an M60 machine gun and two ammo cans trying to start something with North Korea. He didn't make it. Still another soldier defected to North Korea and was found dead in a river near the DMZ and dozens of other interesting incidents while serving there.

One of the first movie screenplays I wrote called The 38th Parallel, a military thriller set in Korea, is currently being read by two "A" list actors and several production companies. Asia's top actress signed to star in it.

Another military script called DMZ, about the killing of Cpt Bonifas and 1Lt Barrett is almost completed. Several actors are interested in those roles. So, hopefully there will be a couple more military flicks hitting the theaters early next year.



I remember that grenade incident, I was in that MP quanset hut shortly after that happened and saw the three foot hole blown in the wall(it was on the right hand side as you walked in the front door, just a few feet from the patrol desk), the daisy pattern of the frags on the tile floor and all the red circles all over the walls and ceiling where the CID circled the fragments that penetrated. That was on Christmas morning or there abouts wasn't it? Wow.....small world! If I remember correctly a couple of KATUSAs and one GI were injured.

ARDOC, I had many very good Korean friends there and was never treated bad by any Korean. Matter of fact, they treated me better than most Americans ever did in my life. You are right, most people there were glad for our presence there. Don't know about today's public opinion but I suspect its probably the same, save a few misinformed college students....much like here in the U.S.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:33:28 PM EDT
Tag
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:47:24 PM EDT
Yep, it was the same grenade incident. Were you there when a soldier from the 1/72 Armor stole a tank and tried to blow up the MP Station?

My first 6 months in Korea was nothing but partying and you know. After getting that out of my system, I spent a lot of my free time traveling around Korea. Had a great time, some of the best of my life.

Once on patrol we had a flat tire in the city of Uijongbu next to a Korean church. An elderly Korean man exited in a three piece suit and insisted on changing our tire. He said he fought along the Americans in the Korean War and had the utmost respect for US soldiers who had served in Korea since. Man, it was humbling to stand back and watch this old man change the tire.

Everytime I visit Korea I never stay in a hotel. It's always with KATUSA or ROK soldiers I became friends with while serving there. They are some of the most honest, loyal and kind hearted friends one could hope to have.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:51:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 2:59:21 PM EDT by Ben70]
Quick question - how much Korean do you pick up over there?

Very little/none since most everyone under 40 speaks some english?

Survival words (buy/sell vocab, basic directions, order a beer, 'where is the hospital?' etc)

Limited conversation?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:52:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 2A373:






Why is this guy having a staring contest with a wall? You should have told him he was going to lose.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:09:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:

Originally Posted By 2A373:

img153.imageshack.us/img153/9978/1002392custom3pf.jpg




Why is this guy having a staring contest with a wall? You should have told him he was going to lose.



He is actually standing near the corner so his whole body is not exposed. Only half his body is able to be seen by the enemy.

Soldiers that are chosen for this duty are not your average ROK soldier. They are much taller and much more impressive physically then the average. You have to be over 5-10, the taller and bigger you the better.

You look at the commies and they are little guys.

Its really interesting because I have seen some Korean kids and they are not your average little Asian people. Many are over 6ft tall. My Dad used to say its all the American food they are eating.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:10:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:

Originally Posted By 2A373:

img153.imageshack.us/img153/9978/1002392custom3pf.jpg




Why is this guy having a staring contest with a wall? You should have told him he was going to lose.



It's an illusion created by the angle. As others have pointed out, half of his body is exposed - his right eye can see just fine.

It's usually these kind of posts where I recommend a movie most Americans haven't seen that I personally like, not sure if it is even available in Region 1 DVD yet - or if it ever will be: JSA, but there ya go. For those of us that have been there - the set design is amazingly accurate.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:16:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ARDOC:

Its really interesting because I have seen some Korean kids and they are not your average little Asian people. Many are over 6ft tall. My Dad used to say its all the American food they are eating.




I remember reading that average South Korean kid entering military service now is 5'-9" while the average North Korean military service is 5'-6". The weight difference is more dramatic. Better food, better medical care all makes the difference.

My father is only about 5' 7" and so are my uncles but my brother and I are both about 5"-11" while my cousins are all about 5'-10".

Pizza and burgers makes us taller
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 4:11:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 4:12:40 PM EDT by tommygun2000]

Originally Posted By VanekSF1:
Yep, it was the same grenade incident. Were you there when a soldier from the 1/72 Armor stole a tank and tried to blow up the MP Station?

My first 6 months in Korea was nothing but partying and you know. After getting that out of my system, I spent a lot of my free time traveling around Korea. Had a great time, some of the best of my life.

Once on patrol we had a flat tire in the city of Uijongbu next to a Korean church. An elderly Korean man exited in a three piece suit and insisted on changing our tire. He said he fought along the Americans in the Korean War and had the utmost respect for US soldiers who had served in Korea since. Man, it was humbling to stand back and watch this old man change the tire.

Everytime I visit Korea I never stay in a hotel. It's always with KATUSA or ROK soldiers I became friends with while serving there. They are some of the most honest, loyal and kind hearted friends one could hope to have.



I don't remeber the tank incident, what year was it?

About the KATUSAs.....they were the best. I had several in my section and they were top notch soldiers. I used to get them anything they wanted from the PX. I used to give them all my cigarette rations and bought them beer if they wanted it. They kept me well fed in the field, always bringing food and drink from the local village wherever we were.
I used to teach an english class to about 20 of them twice a week, mainly working on pronuciation. They in turn taught me many Korean words, how to count, enough to get around, shop, ect. down in Seoul.
Always thought about going back but have never had the time or money to do it. Would like to look up a KATUSA sgt that was in my section....he was a good friend who used to take me on weekends to his parents home in Seoul and have dinner and sight see. I always brought his father a bottle of scotch...he loved it.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top