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Posted: 4/2/2006 8:58:08 PM EDT
I have a Yellow Lab and tonite is is second night in the portable kennel I fixed up for him.

He's 10 weeks old, but sounds a lot louder with his barking. Will this take awhile, or is there a better way? I'm following the advice of the breeder.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:01:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:10:31 PM EDT by HKgnnr]
Sure, he'll get used to the crate - different dogs, different lengths of time are needed.

Just make sure you don't respond or go to him when he's howling like a baby. Reward him for getting in the crate and when its time to take him out. He'll soon understand that the crate is his "room" and its good for him.

Edited to Add:

BTW - breeder probably already explained, but just in case. If the crate is too big for him right now, he may end up going to the bathroom in it. What you'll have to do is cut down on the crate size, block off the rear section using cardboard/zipties or such - leave him just enough room to be able to turn around and lay down comfortably. Rule is, they won't poop where they sleep.

Also, if you havent already, introduce him to the kennel several times a day - when youre in the room as well. Reward/praise him going in, ignore him - and when he stops whining a few minutes later, reward/praise him again and let him out. If you keep it fun - he'll end up enjoying it.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:01:39 PM EDT
Stick to your guns.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:04:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:04:50 PM EDT by HoustonHusker]

Originally Posted By CSM:
Stick to your guns.



Exactly. The crate will become his home and security as long as it's big enough for him and you keep it very clean.

HH
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:05:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:06:52 PM EDT by Defcon]
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:12:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:13:11 PM EDT by migradog]
Awesome guys!!!
This little guy is cute as the dickens and is a hoot to play with.
He's going to make a great family dog!
Now that I know there is an end to the sleepless nights, I feel better.
I didn't go through this with my other dog, she took right to the crate.
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:18:15 PM EDT
you can also feed it in the crate, this will help with not pooping/ peeing in it and also liking being in the crate. I know a lot of breeders that have multiple bitches that normally run loose in the house, but during feeding time they all go in their own crate.

Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:20:05 PM EDT
It usually takes about 3 days to crate train a puppy. My advice is to put the crate where it is quiet and away from family [ie not next to your bed or in your living room]. Start a routine with your puppy. Take it outside, carry it to its crate, give it a good night pat, put it in its crate, tell it to hush, close the door, turn out the light, close door to room crate/pup is in, leave.

Listen to the sound of the puppy. If it immediately starts to whine ignore it.

If the puppy goes into pure panic mode repeat steps above. Do not over coddle the puppy during the process but take it out, return it following your night time routine.

If the pup still goes panic wait 5 minutes [time it so you know its been 5 minutes as time goes by slowly]. Generally the pup will settle down after 3 minutes and if its really stubborn take a minute longer. If it doesn't repeat above process.

Good luck. I crate train about 30 pups a year so if you need any help feel free to ask.

Patty
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:26:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:27:11 PM EDT by migradog]
Thanks Patti and the rest of you,
He was in panic mode last night, but right now he seems to be calmed down a bit.
( I hope to sleep through the night)
I have his crate in a downstairs bathroom where it desn't echo too much, but
tomorrow his crate will be in the den. (The wife will need the BR in the morning)
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:28:51 PM EDT
My German Shepherd pup took a few nights to settle into the routine but since then has taken to it well, in fact he now goes to his crate to sleep in at night on his own. Keep at it.

He's turning out to be a great dog!
Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:30:17 PM EDT
Crate training varies.

Heck, my daughter still cries when I put her in there.

Link Posted: 4/2/2006 9:34:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2006 9:35:57 PM EDT by pattymcn]
How old is he? What breed? Male?

Sorry re-read your post. He should be able to sleep about 6 hours straight with out going potty. You might try placing a stuffed toy for him to snuggle with and keep him company [I have an old Teddy Bear that my puppies sleep with] too.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 2:50:32 AM EDT
Here is what they start out as
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 2:55:25 AM EDT
Then they turn into a waterfowling freak
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 3:05:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/3/2006 3:14:34 AM EDT by LS]
Here is the look when you fuck up and miss the shot ,, ANGUS THE MONSTER
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 3:19:15 AM EDT
Some good advise here.

Things I have learned from my redbone pup's reccent crate training:

make sure its the correct size
never punish a dog for going to its crate
place crate in quiet area

NEVER EVER let them out or try to comfort them if they start whining or barking when inside.
personally I dont agree with having food and water in the crate you need to plan your dogs feeding and poop schedule around your own so it works for you, I usually feed once a day in the evening, and he poops later that evening and early in the morning before I go to work.

As for the housebreaking part, MOST dogs will not crap or pee in the crate if its small enough, leave them in there all day and take the dog outside every hour or so. when it goes potty outside reward it heavily with treats and it will eventually get the hang of things.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 5:03:33 AM EDT
Thanks again for the advice. I got about 4 hours sleep last night. (1hr at a time)

I think the crate I have is too big, so the wife will be getting a better one a the pet store during lunch.

LS: My pup is the spitting image of yours.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 5:22:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By migradog:
Thanks again for the advice. I got about 4 hours sleep last night. (1hr at a time)

I think the crate I have is too big, so the wife will be getting a better one a the pet store during lunch.

LS: My pup is the spitting image of yours.

Just find some way to block the pup off from the rest of the crate, no need to get a smaller one.

Kharn
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 5:57:20 AM EDT
When my chocolate lab Jake was a young pup, we used to let him sleep next to the bed in a box.

He'd start whimpering in the night and I'd put my hand on him to calm him.

He'd sit there chewing on my hand as we both went back to sleep....man talk about some weird freakin' dreams!!!

Ed
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 6:01:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LS:
Here is the look when you fuck up and miss the shot ,, ANGUS THE MONSTER





Perfect!This pic is practically beggin' to be captioned!
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 6:07:07 AM EDT
My dad always said to put a windup clock in the bed with the dog

It will imitate its moms heart beat and calm them down

Me I always let my dogs sleep with me so it dont matter to us Kid
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:19:57 AM EDT
Dang, LS! That's a good looking duck getter you got there! Where did you get that handsome dude?!
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:31:55 AM EDT
I crate trained my German Shepherd. Had a few sleepless nights. It got better when I blocked off part of his crate AND covered it with a blanket so it dark inside. A nice comfy dark cave. I never fed him in it. I would put in a small water dish and toys.

The crate I got was for the long term. He grew from 12 pounds at six weeks to 104 pounds at one year old, so you can quess that I had to change the interior dimensions several times. Good luck and have fun.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:32:52 AM EDT
I started this one in a full sized crate (big enough for a 100 + lb dog). Filled the back up with big boxes and removed them as he grew. Put a little blanket and some toys in there. They get a little weird the first few days after being separated from the rest of the litter. It will pass.




They'll turn out just fine.



Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:44:10 AM EDT
Hi Waldo,

Nice pics and beautiful dog.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:45:57 AM EDT
good luck with the little guy! i'm trying to find a dog myself, but i'm looking for an austrialian shepherd
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:26:24 AM EDT
My wife got upset and said this was cheating, but if you go out and exercise and work up a good sweat and put your old T-shirt in the crate, it gets the puppy used to the smell of the leader of his pack. That may help.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:43:39 AM EDT
Bad Idea..

Keep the crate door open while the crate is at home. If its closed the dog will think its being punished. Otherwise use the crate only for transport.

Transporting the dog using the crate to go to the local parks or visiting friends will make the dog trust the crate. When its home, the crate becomes his own trusted (safe)personal space. Do not lock the dog in the crate when its at home..

If your using the crate to keep the dog out of trouble when your not home, try getting a second dog or cat to give him some company. Your dealing with pack mentality..The dog needs a friend.

The crate should never be used for feeding the dog, it should also have a distance(room) from the dog dish. A child could easily be bitten by the dog protecting its crate, and its food.

Place the crate near a back or side door. (next to the door to the yard)

Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:48:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LS:
Here is the look when you fuck up and miss the shot ,, ANGUS THE MONSTER www.hunt101.com/img/392410.jpg



My Lab used to have the same lip bitting confused look when I put her dog cookies in my mouth.
She really got upset with me if I ate the cookie.

Link Posted: 4/3/2006 11:15:35 AM EDT
We crate trained both our beagles and they turned out fine. They both still really like to go to thier cages and sleep in them every night.

If they get really tired and dont want to be bothered, we can usually find them in their cage.

The first two nights were pretty rough, the T-Shirt trick works, and we also put a wind up alarm clock in the cage to they had something rythmic to listen too.

We goofed on our first beagle by not closing the door during the day. We though it was cruel to crate the dog while we were at work. On the advice of the vet we started crating her during the day, and she was fully house broken and stopped eating the house in a week (after letting her roam the kitchen every day for a year). Our second beagle was crated every day from the day we go here and was house trainied at 3 months of age.

Never punish the dog while in the crate and put something over the cage like a blanket so it is like there own little cave.

Good luck and have fun.

Dez
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 11:27:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By HKgnnr:
Sure, he'll get used to the crate - different dogs, different lengths of time are needed.

Just make sure you don't respond or go to him when he's howling like a baby. Reward him for getting in the crate and when its time to take him out. He'll soon understand that the crate is his "room" and its good for him.

Edited to Add:

BTW - breeder probably already explained, but just in case. If the crate is too big for him right now, he may end up going to the bathroom in it. What you'll have to do is cut down on the crate size, block off the rear section using cardboard/zipties or such - leave him just enough room to be able to turn around and lay down comfortably. Rule is, they won't poop where they sleep.

Also, if you havent already, introduce him to the kennel several times a day - when youre in the room as well. Reward/praise him going in, ignore him - and when he stops whining a few minutes later, reward/praise him again and let him out. If you keep it fun - he'll end up enjoying it.



+1

Crate training is the only way to properly train your dog that going poopy is for the outdoors. That's why you keep the crate close to their size and take them outside to poop immeidately when you open the crate to let them out. They need to associate being let out with going poopy. Eventually, the crate is replace by the house. Then, when you let the dog out of the house, he knows it's time to go poopy.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 11:37:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/3/2006 11:38:02 AM EDT by DeltaDelta214]
Yep. Once my GSD was trained to the crate he didn't crap in the house. I eventually let him have run of the house and he hasn't had an accident in eight months. BTW, I put a cow bell on the door knob of the back door and trained him to ring the bell if he wanted to go outside. When friends come over and he rings the bell it blows their mind.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 11:51:57 AM EDT


Remember one thing about Labs, they love people, and they love you. They don't like to be seperated from you. (They will eat your house if you leave them) ( at least when young)
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 12:10:07 PM EDT
The technique I've used for puppies (I didn't make it up a breader taught me 30 years ago)

Wrap a clock that ticks in a towel and put it in the crate, suppossed to be like a heart beat and calm them.

For the first few nights I have always put it beside the bed then slowly moved it away once the dog was used to it.

Don't know if it's the best way but I've done it a couple times and it worked well. A little less trauma, especially for a dog that just left it's mom and siblings.

Dogs are not meant to be alone, it is an unnatural and unheathly state and they know it. (just like people)
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 1:34:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Waldo:

Remember one thing about Labs, they love people, and they love you. They don't like to be seperated from you. (They will eat your house if you leave them) ( at least when young)



He's already started to eat my duty boots.



You right about him loving us. More than 2 minutes alone and he gets separation anxiety.
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