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Posted: 3/29/2006 9:17:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 9:32:21 AM EDT by speedboy]
I talked to a recruter yesterday. And I had some questions for you guys.

Is it true that the Navy is trying to cut 60,000 jobs?

What type of subjects do you cover in the Nuke school?

What is the major job diference between, Machinist Mate, HR, or other jobs that include welding?
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 9:53:31 AM EDT
What is this? No one has a comment?
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 10:33:00 AM EDT
speedboy,

I was a Hospital Corpsman so I can't speak to the rates that you specify.

Try putting this in the Hall of Hero's forum and you should get some better responses.

For what it's worth, I think you get out of the military just what you put into it. If you go in with an open mind, leave any attitude at the door, and take every opportunity you can to learn, you'll get a lot out of it.

The one thing that I suggest to every potential recruit that I meet: Figure out what you think you might like to do, then talk to one or two people that are doing that job day-in-and-day-out and find out what their daily routine is. You might be in for a suprise or two, but it will help you mentally prepare for what your life will be like for the next few years. Do this for EACH duty station you will possibly be going to as well. I went through Search And Rescue training and because I chose a duty station based on it's geographical location, I ended up passing out eyeglasses 3 out of 4 weeks each month. hat
Best of luck!

- Mike
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 10:39:40 AM EDT
As a nuke MM, you get a chance at ELT or Nuke/underwater Welding school. ELT could go anywhere. As a welder, I think you are pretty much subs, but I went ELT, so I can't be sure.

I was in about 10 years ago, but basically you cover math, chemistry, some physics and basic MM stuff in the nuke A school. Like what you would have covered in some classes in high school and maybe college. The MM stuff was an accelerated a school where you learned about valves, oils, taking some things apart. Bearing clearances and such. Stuff I never did again for the Navy.

Power school had a dark and light side.
The light side was just math and science as I recalled. Mostly college level. Never got above trig I think.
Dark side went into nuke stuff. Heat transfer and fluid flow theroy and was basically hard core science and tougher than the rest.

Then proto type where you get to play with a real one.

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 10:43:20 AM EDT
Yes USN is cutting the force by 60k over the next few years. HM's are medical types and have been consolidated to include dental types.

Dont know much about Nukes but there's a couple here that will be along to help you shortly.

Welding rates... probably Hull Techs(still call them that?), MM's. maybe others.

Just dont go as an UNDESIGNATED STRIKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 11:40:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 12:07:38 PM EDT by LWilde]
Spend some time online at Navy.mil and learn all you can about the different jobs.

What do YOU want to do? There is a broad spectrum of jobs available to you. There are some very interesting and fun jobs out there. A lot will determine on your ASVAB scores and personal interests.

Nuclear power is one of the premier jobs but you will usually served in only carriers if you are a surface nuke or subs if SS qualified.

HMs are the medics. They serve everywhere, even with the Marines. You might get some good trigger time if you opt for corpsman rating.

Some enlisted aircrew get a lot of flight time in, such as the AWs that sit in the back of ASW helos or in P-3s.

Gunners Mates take care of destroyers' main guns and small arms.

There are some exciting jobs in Special Warfare that do not require you to be a SEAL. The attack boat crews that carry the SEALs for example...and lots of guns as well.

Sub duty pays more...as does flying. Certain jobs carry with them a HUGE re-enlistment bonus. You might want to check on that before choosing.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:04:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PropellerHeadMike: I was a Hospital Corpsman so I can't speak to the rates that you specify.
Hey speedboy, don't sign up to be a Corpsman! You'll be feeling up your shipmate's balls at foreign ports after they catch a bug from "Mama-San's House of Delight".


Hehe, I'm just razzing PropellerHeadMike. If you want to get into the Nuke program, get a sheet full of math formulas and a writing handbook. Study them before hitting the ASVAB.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:08:19 PM EDT
USAF is going to cut 40,000 jobs also.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:10:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 12:11:10 PM EDT by bwyatt]
Alot of those jobs are going to be the phasing out of P-3 squadrons. They will be replaced with 737's.This means less air crew and they will be going to civilian based maintenance so all those maintenance billets will disappear. A sad time indeed for the Anti-Submarine Warfare community.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:18:28 PM EDT
Check these forums out, speedboy. Everything you could want to know.

Military.com forums
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:42:21 PM EDT
Forgot to add, if you plan on being a nuke, you will have to be in 6 years min. If you plan on staying in till you retire, it is your fast track to higher ranks. Some have been known to make e-7 in 7 or 8 years.
You will have 1.5 to 2 years in school, then 4 years sea duty, then 2 years shore duty. Then you could change from subs or carriers to a tender job. Stuff to think about.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:49:11 PM EDT
I've stood EOOW and OOD on fast attacks, so I can answer a few questions. The nuke rates (EM, ET, MM) follow a similar pipeline and for the most part train and work together. An A school, followed by 6 months at Power School, and 6 months at prototype. Don't confuse my description of these rates with conventional MM's, ET's and EM's. Totally different.

MM's do have the opportunity to pick up welder, but that is a collateral duty on subs. You will weld a test fixture a couple times a year, and that is about it. If the boat requires serious repairs, they will be done in port by shipyard personnel. ELT's have a reputation for being lazy and sleazy, but that isn't really the case. The chemistry they do is basic and repetitive. All of the watches stood by other MM's are stood by MM-ELT's, at least for proficiency. MM watches are hot, loud, and dirty.

EM's work on electrical systems throughout the boat, including rotating electrical machinery (pumps, motor generators, etc). EM's also qualify Shutdown Reactor Operator, which is the senior inport watch station in the engineroom. EM's are the nuke rates who spend the most time working on non-nuclear systems (clothes dryer, deep fat fryer, lighting, etc).

ET's are the only rate qualified to troubleshoot and repair circuit boards, reactor protection systems, etc. They "should" be the most competant in understanding reactor plant response to various conditions. They stand very dull, long watches staring at dials that generally don't move. After watch, they spend 3-6 hours performing very detailed, complex, and boring maintenance. Most ET's I've met are extremely bitter.

Any of the three rates may also have the chance to go to dive school for six weeks. All SSN's have a small team of scuba divers pulled from the forward (coners) and aft (nuke) divisions. Don't get too excited, because like welding, it is a collateral duty.

If you are looking for "action" of any sort, I recommend you look elsewhere. Being a nuke is all about getting the job done, no matter how dull or repetitive, and doing it perfectly. Being at sea, it doesn't matter where you are or what the boat is doing, your job as a nuke will always be the same. In port has its ups and downs. Sometimes you will work 15 hours a day, others only 6. Duty rotations (24 hour duty) will range from "port and stbd" (duty every other day) to 5 section (duty every five days). Remember, that is in addition to time at sea and normal work days.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:58:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Valkyrie:

Just dont go as an UNDESIGNATED STRIKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Why I did in 86' ALOT OF people did? What's you reason for this. I did decide to stay in 1'st division I was a BM......A REAL SAILOR
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:59:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 1:01:23 PM EDT by HRoark]

Originally Posted By Andrewh:
Forgot to add, if you plan on being a nuke, you will have to be in 6 years min. If you plan on staying in till you retire, it is your fast track to higher ranks. Some have been known to make e-7 in 7 or 8 years.
You will have 1.5 to 2 years in school, then 4 years sea duty, then 2 years shore duty. Then you could change from subs or carriers to a tender job. Stuff to think about.



What he said.

I was a nuke ET and made E-6 at 5 years. Being a nuke will set you up well if you don't want to make a career out of the military. Finding a job will not be difficult at all.

If you want to make a career out of being a nuke, then there are some drawbacks. Sea/shore rotation sucks, and the shore billet choices are VERY limited. If you don't want to go to upstate New York or Charleston, SC pretty much your only bet is recruiting duty somewhere. Your duty rotation will more than likely be the worst on the ship, and if you end up on the Enterprise, all your cruises will be at least 2 days longer than everyone elses to allow for RX startups and shutdowns.

If you stay in though, with the bonuses and some good investing, you could easily be very well off when you retire.

Personally, I hated every single second of the time I spent as a nuke in the Navy.

Am I glad now that I did it? Yes, for many reasons.

Knowing what I know now, would I do it again? In a second.


edited to add that eddiein1984 descibed ETs rather well.

"ET's are the only rate qualified to troubleshoot and repair circuit boards, reactor protection systems, etc. They "should" be the most competant in understanding reactor plant response to various conditions. They stand very dull, long watches staring at dials that generally don't move. After watch, they spend 3-6 hours performing very detailed, complex, and boring maintenance. Most ET's I've met are extremely bitter. "
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:01:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 1:05:57 PM EDT by eddiein1984]
As far as subjects in Nuke school, keep in mind that it is a non-calculus based curriculum. They assume only an algebra level of math skills. The physics you learn will be rudimentary and not college level by any means. The same for chemisty and electrical engineering. Don't expect to get any college engineering credits from this stuff.

If you think you may want to be an officer, don't enlist. Period. If you can get through two years of engineering or a physical science, with good grades, then you have some much better options. Once you are within two years of graduation, you can join NUPOC (Nuc Propulsion Officer Candidate). You will get paid about $2400/month for the remaining two years, but you won't wear a uniform or have to drill like the ROTC guys. You basically just get paid to go to school. When you graduate, you go to OCS and then enter the nuke training pipeline. Life as an officer is drastically better than that of an enlisted nuke. Plus, you will have much better pay, a shorter commitment, and better job prospects since you will already have a BS. However, duty rotations and time at sea still sucks. Don't think it will be glamorous by any means. You will have the opportunity to drive the boat, both surfaced and submerged, which is sometimes cool.

Don't listen to anything the recruiter says about earning a degree while serving as a nuke. While it is strictly possible, forget about it. The only way it is feasible is if you get picked up for STA-21, which is not guaranteed.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:04:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2006 1:04:38 PM EDT by slaughter]
JMO

But it is really a bad time to enlist.

Whatever you do good luck to you.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:14:11 PM EDT
I repaired avionics equipment, well I repaired the actual aircraft when its avionics went bad (AT rating, O level).

It just depends on what you are interested in doing. I had a lot of fun, and the G.I. Bill can't be beat.

Just be sure and get what you want in writing first.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:16:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LWilde:
Some enlisted aircrew get a lot of flight time in, such as the AWs that sit in the back of ASW helos or in P-3s.



He didn't say he was gay.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:22:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bwyatt:
Alot of those jobs are going to be the phasing out of P-3 squadrons. They will be replaced with 737's.This means less air crew and they will be going to civilian based maintenance so all those maintenance billets will disappear. A sad time indeed for the Anti-Submarine Warfare community.



That's not going to happen.
They will still be maintained by Navy Personnel, but will have a maintenance contract along the lines of the E-6B TACAMO planes where supply, GSE, some functions of AIMD and training will be contracted out.
Currently Boeing has the contract for the E-6B program.

The big question is if the Navy is going to station all of the 737 variants (P-8 and C-40) at one master base (like the 707's of TACAMO at Tinker AFB).
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:27:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Carhlr:

Originally Posted By Valkyrie:

Just dont go as an UNDESIGNATED STRIKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Why I did in 86' ALOT OF people did? What's you reason for this. I did decide to stay in 1'st division I was a BM......A REAL SAILOR



I was an undesignated aviation striker when I joined.
I figured it out fast, I didn't want to clean shitters (never did a tour in First LT) so I spent my spare time learning how to work on aircraft and learning about the various maintenance rates.
I was sent to the line, spent almost two years out there and made third class.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:29:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
I repaired avionics equipment, well I repaired the actual aircraft when its avionics went bad (AT rating, O level).



Ahhh, AT, a black boxoligist, or a box-swapper.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:45:00 PM EDT
My bad,that was just what I was told up at Pax by NAWC.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:47:16 PM EDT
Line Rat.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:51:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bwyatt:
Line Rat.



Worse. Aircrew.
Not an AW though, I worked for a living. I struck for AMS (back in the old days) and made it.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 1:57:20 PM EDT
AD here, work center 110%.Nice to see a few Navy guys around.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:13:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eddiein1984:
As far as subjects in Nuke school, keep in mind that it is a non-calculus based curriculum. They assume only an algebra level of math skills. The physics you learn will be rudimentary and not college level by any means. The same for chemisty and electrical engineering. Don't expect to get any college engineering credits from this stuff.

If you think you may want to be an officer, don't enlist. Period. If you can get through two years of engineering or a physical science, with good grades, then you have some much better options. Once you are within two years of graduation, you can join NUPOC (Nuc Propulsion Officer Candidate). You will get paid about $2400/month for the remaining two years, but you won't wear a uniform or have to drill like the ROTC guys. You basically just get paid to go to school. When you graduate, you go to OCS and then enter the nuke training pipeline. Life as an officer is drastically better than that of an enlisted nuke. Plus, you will have much better pay, a shorter commitment, and better job prospects since you will already have a BS. However, duty rotations and time at sea still sucks. Don't think it will be glamorous by any means. You will have the opportunity to drive the boat, both surfaced and submerged, which is sometimes cool.

Don't listen to anything the recruiter says about earning a degree while serving as a nuke. While it is strictly possible, forget about it. The only way it is feasible is if you get picked up for STA-21, which is not guaranteed.




Well, I didnt think enlisted nuke school was quite as easy as one may think based on the above reply. It can be fairly demanding in some of the 'foreign' classes that I doubt anyone in my class had experienced. Reactor Principles/Heat Transfer for example. There is a ton of help available for you if you want it though.
It would be close to impossible to get any real degree while serving on a ship...especially a submarine (i dont know how surface nuke life is). There are some schools that will give you credit for some of the classes you have taken, but its basically a bullshit degree from thomas edison university.
I was enlisted, and would not have done it any other way. I saved college for after I got out.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:18:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Carhlr:

Originally Posted By Valkyrie:

Just dont go as an UNDESIGNATED STRIKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Why I did in 86' ALOT OF people did? What's you reason for this. I did decide to stay in 1'st division I was a BM......A REAL SAILOR

I earned aircrew wings while guys I came in are still cleaning the shitter and such.. But I did enjoy the Line while I was there. Any good gossip in the squadron and the Line Shack is on it!
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:20:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Andrewh:
Forgot to add, if you plan on being a nuke, you will have to be in 6 years min. If you plan on staying in till you retire, it is your fast track to higher ranks. Some have been known to make e-7 in 7 or 8 years.
You will have 1.5 to 2 years in school, then 4 years sea duty, then 2 years shore duty. Then you could change from subs or carriers to a tender job. Stuff to think about.



orrrr....

just get out at 6

also...keep in mind that it would be VERY difficult to do anything but nuke stuff if you want to stay in past 6. I have seen guys be told the navy would rather lose them than allow them to cross-rate (take another job). You would have to do some pretty shady stuff to get yourself disqualified from being a nuke and still be able to stay in. Maybe a minor psych episode or something.

The point being...there are ALOT of more enjoyable jobs out in the fleet than being a nuke. If you want to make it a career, do something FUN (i.e. not nuke) or you will hate your life. If you want a vacation be a sonar tech
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:22:46 PM EDT
It might be better pay to be an officer, but all my div-o's hated life. Now mind you all my class ships have been decommed, so it might be easier on a carrier, but they had to learn crap they never got to use. They spent their day begging someone to sign off on their quals for something the got to do once in pretend land, because no one is going to sign off on them doing a real chemistry check on anything. SG or the reator. They spent the rest of their time knee deep in paperwork trying to catch up with the bag the last div-o left.
If you can stand the politics and can do the time then go for it. If you are just in it for the experience, I wouldn't bother. Would have gotten out much sooner if I had to deal with the crap I saw them take.
I too am glad for my time in, even though I hated most of it too. And I would do it again if given the choice.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:31:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Botch:

Originally Posted By eddiein1984:
As far as subjects in Nuke school, keep in mind that it is a non-calculus based curriculum. They assume only an algebra level of math skills. The physics you learn will be rudimentary and not college level by any means. The same for chemisty and electrical engineering. Don't expect to get any college engineering credits from this stuff.

If you think you may want to be an officer, don't enlist. Period. If you can get through two years of engineering or a physical science, with good grades, then you have some much better options. Once you are within two years of graduation, you can join NUPOC (Nuc Propulsion Officer Candidate). You will get paid about $2400/month for the remaining two years, but you won't wear a uniform or have to drill like the ROTC guys. You basically just get paid to go to school. When you graduate, you go to OCS and then enter the nuke training pipeline. Life as an officer is drastically better than that of an enlisted nuke. Plus, you will have much better pay, a shorter commitment, and better job prospects since you will already have a BS. However, duty rotations and time at sea still sucks. Don't think it will be glamorous by any means. You will have the opportunity to drive the boat, both surfaced and submerged, which is sometimes cool.

Don't listen to anything the recruiter says about earning a degree while serving as a nuke. While it is strictly possible, forget about it. The only way it is feasible is if you get picked up for STA-21, which is not guaranteed.




Well, I didnt think enlisted nuke school was quite as easy as one may think based on the above reply. It can be fairly demanding in some of the 'foreign' classes that I doubt anyone in my class had experienced. Reactor Principles/Heat Transfer for example. There is a ton of help available for you if you want it though.
It would be close to impossible to get any real degree while serving on a ship...especially a submarine (i dont know how surface nuke life is). There are some schools that will give you credit for some of the classes you have taken, but its basically a bullshit degree from thomas edison university.
I was enlisted, and would not have done it any other way. I saved college for after I got out.



That is true. Half the people fail out. Between power school and prototype before they ever get to the fleet.
also if you are not doing well, they can assign you a mandatory study time after class is over. Any where from 10 hours up to 40 hours in addition to actual class time. Anyone scoring less then a 3.0 I think is required some time after hours. That is per week.
Hard to do for a lot of guys when school is in orlando, fl and daytona isn't that far away.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 2:51:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Andrewh:
Originally Posted By Botch:
Originally Posted By eddiein1984:

That is true. Half the people fail out. Between power school and prototype before they ever get to the fleet.
also if you are not doing well, they can assign you a mandatory study time after class is over. Any where from 10 hours up to 40 hours in addition to actual class time. Anyone scoring less then a 3.0 I think is required some time after hours. That is per week.
Hard to do for a lot of guys when school is in orlando, fl and daytona isn't that far away.



School WAS in Orlando for me....now everything but NY prototype is in Goose Creek, SC.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 4:16:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:

Originally Posted By LWilde:
Some enlisted aircrew get a lot of flight time in, such as the AWs that sit in the back of ASW helos or in P-3s.



He didn't say he was gay.



No...I missed that one too...
Link Posted: 3/30/2006 6:05:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Andrewh:

Originally Posted By Botch:

Originally Posted By eddiein1984:
As far as subjects in Nuke school, keep in mind that it is a non-calculus based curriculum. They assume only an algebra level of math skills. The physics you learn will be rudimentary and not college level by any means. The same for chemisty and electrical engineering. Don't expect to get any college engineering credits from this stuff.

If you think you may want to be an officer, don't enlist. Period. If you can get through two years of engineering or a physical science, with good grades, then you have some much better options. Once you are within two years of graduation, you can join NUPOC (Nuc Propulsion Officer Candidate). You will get paid about $2400/month for the remaining two years, but you won't wear a uniform or have to drill like the ROTC guys. You basically just get paid to go to school. When you graduate, you go to OCS and then enter the nuke training pipeline. Life as an officer is drastically better than that of an enlisted nuke. Plus, you will have much better pay, a shorter commitment, and better job prospects since you will already have a BS. However, duty rotations and time at sea still sucks. Don't think it will be glamorous by any means. You will have the opportunity to drive the boat, both surfaced and submerged, which is sometimes cool.

Don't listen to anything the recruiter says about earning a degree while serving as a nuke. While it is strictly possible, forget about it. The only way it is feasible is if you get picked up for STA-21, which is not guaranteed.




Well, I didnt think enlisted nuke school was quite as easy as one may think based on the above reply. It can be fairly demanding in some of the 'foreign' classes that I doubt anyone in my class had experienced. Reactor Principles/Heat Transfer for example. There is a ton of help available for you if you want it though.
It would be close to impossible to get any real degree while serving on a ship...especially a submarine (i dont know how surface nuke life is). There are some schools that will give you credit for some of the classes you have taken, but its basically a bullshit degree from thomas edison university.
I was enlisted, and would not have done it any other way. I saved college for after I got out.



That is true. Half the people fail out. Between power school and prototype before they ever get to the fleet.
also if you are not doing well, they can assign you a mandatory study time after class is over. Any where from 10 hours up to 40 hours in addition to actual class time. Anyone scoring less then a 3.0 I think is required some time after hours. That is per week.
Hard to do for a lot of guys when school is in orlando, fl and daytona isn't that far away.



It's getting a lot harder to fail out hese days.

When I went through in the mid 90s, one or two test failures would get you dropped from the pipeline, I heard it was even more strict in the days before me.

Now, it's possible to fail entire SECTIONS and still make it through.
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