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Posted: 3/27/2006 2:10:56 AM EDT
I remember seeing this on one of the Max-X shows. This is just another reason why a .50 Cal is necessary during swim calls.

http://www.badongo.com/vid.php?file=2005-08-28_shark-attack.wmv&s=
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 2:43:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tacberry:
I remember seeing this on one of the Max-X shows. This is just another reason why a .50 Cal is necessary during swim calls.

http://www.badongo.com/vid.php?file=2005-08-28_shark-attack.wmv&s=



link is hot
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 2:45:17 AM EDT
Fuck the ocean. Right in the ear.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:28:04 AM EDT
Don't kill the shark, he doesnt like Hippies either.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:50:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By zer04evr:
Don't kill the shark, he doesnt like Hippies either.



The woman who got ate () was not a hippie. She is actually pretty conservative and VERY nice.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:51:29 AM EDT
Wonder if the oceanographic students will still feel all warm and fuzzy about sharks now ?
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:59:26 AM EDT
.50 cal? guess you guys never saw the mythbusters where they proved that a .50 bmg will disintergrate after 18 inches penetrationtion into water?? There is a reason why they use Harpoons.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 4:03:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BlackDog714:

Originally Posted By zer04evr:
Don't kill the shark, he doesnt like Hippies either.



The woman who got ate () was not a hippie. She is actually pretty conservative and VERY nice.



That's not what I heard from one of those wildest videos things. They made it out to seem that the group was some greenpeace like group. Sorry for my mistake.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:08:43 AM EDT
WTF? That thing had loaded 3% after a minute on DSL. Is my pooter screwed again or did anyone else have that problem? FN pooters.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:15:28 AM EDT
While it certainly sucks for the lady, my own personal "risk managment calculator" tends to say "stay the hell out of the deep blue" for exactly this reason.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:19:25 AM EDT
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:21:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By desertmoon:
Fuck the ocean. Right in the ear.



+1
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:22:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!



Especially if you stay out of their home.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:31:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 6:38:48 AM EDT by scuba_ed]

Originally Posted By kcobean:

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!



Especially if you stay out of their home.



___

Out of their home? Don't understand....

That said, for a SCUBA diver, it is truly exciting to see these creatures which are not the denizens of the deep as portrayed by hollywood and so unfairly biased by those with less experience and knowledge.

I have ~ two hours of video of shark encounters I've accumilated over the past six years, with some spectacular footage during night dives of these majestic torpedo's prowling the reefs.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:47:27 AM EDT
Pretty sloppy camera work there. Like the guy had never seen his friend attacked by a shark before.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:56:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:

Originally Posted By kcobean:

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!



Especially if you stay out of their home.



___

Out of their home? Don't understand....

That said, for a SCUBA diver, it is truly exciting to see these creatures which are not the denizens of the deep as portrayed by hollywood and so unfairly biased by those with less experience and knowledge.

I have ~ two hours of video of shark encounters I've accumilated over the past six years, with some spectacular footage during night dives of these majestic torpedo's prowling the reefs.




Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.

Regardless of how much video footage you have, unless you have some secret pact with these giant, meat eating living dinosaurs, you're taking your life in your hands every time you get in the water with them....I understand that you know a hell of alot more about them than me, but one thing I do know is that they are hardwired to eat, and when you're floppin' around in the water, you're food, plain and simple. If you stay out of their environment, they'll stick to eating fish.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:04:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By kcobean:
Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.




Well, if you stay out of the shark's home - the ocean - I would think the chances of being attacked are significanly less than of being struck by lightening. Something around 0.00%, I'm guessing.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:17:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eswanson:

Originally Posted By kcobean:
Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.




Well, if you stay out of the shark's home - the ocean - I would think the chances of being attacked are significanly less than of being struck by lightening. Something around 0.00%, I'm guessing.



0.00%! Works for me.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:18:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 7:27:47 AM EDT by scuba_ed]

Originally Posted By kcobean:

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:

Originally Posted By kcobean:

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!



Especially if you stay out of their home.



___

Out of their home? Don't understand....

That said, for a SCUBA diver, it is truly exciting to see these creatures which are not the denizens of the deep as portrayed by hollywood and so unfairly biased by those with less experience and knowledge.

I have ~ two hours of video of shark encounters I've accumilated over the past six years, with some spectacular footage during night dives of these majestic torpedo's prowling the reefs.




Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.

Regardless of how much video footage you have, unless you have some secret pact with these giant, meat eating living dinosaurs, you're taking your life in your hands every time you get in the water with them....I understand that you know a hell of alot more about them than me, but one thing I do know is that they are hardwired to eat, and when you're floppin' around in the water, you're food, plain and simple. If you stay out of their environment, they'll stick to eating fish.



___

Clarification...The chances of a shark attack are still within the statistical limits I posted. Staying out of the sharks "home" [water] or the domain of lightning [upon land or water] are statistically sound. So, too, are the chances of being killed by a bee, though both bee's and humans occupy the same environs. Don't become too passionate about what is scarry to you by a lack of education and/or experience.

Re:
___

"...some secret pact with these giant, meat eating living dinosaurs, you're taking your life in your hands every time you get in the water with them."

__

Sharks, like posters exhibit known displays of behavior. A shark in distress (diver too close) or a shark too close to another shark, or in persuit of food, will exhibit physical characteristics that are important to note. Lateral fins will assume a trident-shape, and the back will arch for a shark that is truely on the prowl or is upset.

Re:

"...they are hardwired to eat, and when you're floppin' around in the water, you're food, plain and simple. If you stay out of their environment, they'll stick to eating fish."

___

SCUBA divers don't flop around in water...that's a waste of energy and air.

kcobean, I can appreciate your fear of the unknown, though there is no reason nor apparent sanity to cause the rationale to your apparent fear, especially if your knowledge of the subject is from an internet video, horror-flick, or closet of fears.





Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:22:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eswanson:

Originally Posted By kcobean:
Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.




Well, if you stay out of the shark's home - the ocean - I would think the chances of being attacked are significanly less than of being struck by lightening. Something around 0.00%, I'm guessing.



___

The coastal areas, especially near shore, and typically within 3-4 feet of water is where most shark attacks occur. Again, the likelyhood of an attack, much less one that is fatal, is less than the chance of being killed by a bee.

However, people have ancient fears of being eaten. So, too, does the press play a great role in making the story of the day with these rare events.



Ed
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:55:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
I've dived for twenty years, and have seen sharks and had some close encounters from the Red Sea to the Coral Sea, and many trips throughout the Carribbean. Being eaten by an animal is an ancient fear humans have, though the chances of a shark attack are less than the chances of being struck by lightning!



I have often heard that statistic quoted. I just have to wonder how the numbers are derived. Is it time weighted? Pretty much if you're outdoors you are subject to lightning. It's somewhat seasonal, but just last week here in CO it was snowing and we had thunder boomers. As opposed to the hours humans actually spend in a body of water that has sharks.

????
inquiring minds want to know.

Vic out.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:07:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:

Originally Posted By eswanson:

Originally Posted By kcobean:
Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.




Well, if you stay out of the shark's home - the ocean - I would think the chances of being attacked are significanly less than of being struck by lightening. Something around 0.00%, I'm guessing.



___

The coastal areas, especially near shore, and typically within 3-4 feet of water is where most shark attacks occur. Again, the likelyhood of an attack, much less one that is fatal, is less than the chance of being killed by a bee.

However, people have ancient fears of being eaten. So, too, does the press play a great role in making the story of the day with these rare events.



Ed




Yeah, but being killed by a bee means that you were allergic to it (unless we are talking about being swarmed by africanized bees). And if you are out and about, other than the dead of winter, bees are likely coming and going all around you all day long, not so with sharks.

The stats just don't pass the smell test.

By the way, every real vacaton (not a family visit) that the wife and I have taken for the last fifteen years was a warm water vacation centered around snorkleing, including our honeymoon. And I got my dive cert when I was 17. So we accept the risk.

I just think the stats are fishy!

Vic really out.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:11:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 9:14:44 AM EDT by Alien]
Tag

The odds statement somebody made is pretty misleading. It reminds me of gungrabber odds that they spout. You might be more likely to get struck by lightning if you never swim in the ocean maybe, but once you enter the ocean, your chances of being attacked by a shark drastically increase.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:42:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Alien:
Tag

The odds statement somebody made is pretty misleading. It reminds me of gungrabber odds that they spout. You might be more likely to get struck by lightning if you never swim in the ocean maybe, but once you enter the ocean, your chances of being attacked by a shark drastically increase.



___

"The odds statement somebody made is pretty misleading...", not if you know what you're talking about....

If you have so many fears, then, do not wade in shallow coastal waters.

The onus is upon the ignorant to simply learn and seek the statistics.

SCUBA divers have frequent and peaceful shark encounters.

Simply because you don't have this experience and are apparently influenced by popular media and are able to post doesn't ascribe any authority other than you are a ***wipe !!!!!






Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:58:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 10:00:39 AM EDT by scuba_ed]

Originally Posted By TrickyVic:

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:

Originally Posted By eswanson:

Originally Posted By kcobean:
Clarification.....The chances of a shark attack are less than being struck by lightning, especially if you stay out of the sharks home.




Well, if you stay out of the shark's home - the ocean - I would think the chances of being attacked are significanly less than of being struck by lightening. Something around 0.00%, I'm guessing.



___

The coastal areas, especially near shore, and typically within 3-4 feet of water is where most shark attacks occur. Again, the likelyhood of an attack, much less one that is fatal, is less than the chance of being killed by a bee.

However, people have ancient fears of being eaten. So, too, does the press play a great role in making the story of the day with these rare events.



Ed




Yeah, but being killed by a bee means that you were allergic to it (unless we are talking about being swarmed by africanized bees). And if you are out and about, other than the dead of winter, bees are likely coming and going all around you all day long, not so with sharks.

The stats just don't pass the smell test.

By the way, every real vacaton (not a family visit) that the wife and I have taken for the last fifteen years was a warm water vacation centered around snorkleing, including our honeymoon. And I got my dive cert when I was 17. So we accept the risk.

I just think the stats are fishy!

Vic really out.



___

Smell test or you being a ***wipe? Yeah, your're out there...

The rest is commentary...now go learn.

I'm outta here.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 10:34:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scuba_ed:
___

Clarification...The chances of a shark attack are still within the statistical limits I posted.



That may be, and the statistical limits I posted are still true....stay out of the ocean, you won't get attacked by a shark. The fact that it's a risk you're willing to take doesn't make either of us wrong. And it may be true that being killed by a bee is as or more likely, but I don't necessarily have an option in my daily life to avoid co-habitation with bees. Risk management is a different process for everyone. I won't disagree that your level of education about sharks and their behavior gives you better odds, however it wouldn't have helped the girl in that video one bit.


Don't become too passionate about what is scarry to you by a lack of education and/or experience.


So again, you're telling me that all of your education and experience in that girls brain would have changed the outcome? The ONLY thing it could have changed is that it might have kept her out of the water which is exactly my point. I'll stop being passionate if you'll stop being condescending.




Re:
___

"...some secret pact with these giant, meat eating living dinosaurs, you're taking your life in your hands every time you get in the water with them."

__

Sharks, like posters exhibit known displays of behavior. A shark in distress (diver too close) or a shark too close to another shark, or in persuit of food, will exhibit physical characteristics that are important to note. Lateral fins will assume a trident-shape, and the back will arch for a shark that is truely on the prowl or is upset.



Again, this is all happy information to know about sharks, but I don't think it would have helped her. I don't even think she saw the shark coming, so assessing the physical characteristics of the shark is meaningless.




Re:

"...they are hardwired to eat, and when you're floppin' around in the water, you're food, plain and simple. If you stay out of their environment, they'll stick to eating fish."

___

SCUBA divers don't flop around in water...that's a waste of energy and air.



Whatever, you're correcting me on points that have jack to do with the topic at hand. So she was "swimming" not "flopping". Didn't make one bit of difference to the shark, did it?




kcobean, I can appreciate your fear of the unknown, though there is no reason nor apparent sanity to cause the rationale to your apparent fear, especially if your knowledge of the subject is from an internet video, horror-flick, or closet of fears.



LOL....Are we having the same conversation? I'll be the first to look you up and give you the big "I told you so" when some big-ass shark defies all of your education and chews off YOUR leg. They may have behavioral patterns that give "indicators" as to their intent, but as with most animals, one never knows for sure. How many stories have we heard about pit-bull owners who say "He's such a nice, friendly dog. I just can't imagine why he took off and mauled that child to death. One minute he was playing fetch with his favorite rubber chicken toy, the next he was standing over her with her trachea in his mouth."



Link Posted: 3/27/2006 11:29:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 11:30:53 AM EDT by llanero]
It seems she made it:

Heather Boswell, March 1994, offshore Chile: while taking an open ocean swim from a ship some 300 miles (480 kilometres) off the coast of Chile, Boswell was gently nibbled and released by a 12-foot (3.6-metre) White Shark which then casually circled around and bit her left leg, severing it above the knee before she could be pulled from the water; considering that the shark had the means and plenty of opportunity to remove large, bite-sized pieces and even consume her outright, Boswell got off remarkably lightly.

I guess it's all relative, eh?


www.elasmo-research.org/education/white_shark/mistaken_identity.htm
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 12:45:50 PM EDT
Damn creepy ass sharks...
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:07:24 PM EDT
Boy, I leave the thread alone for one night ...

I don't care how non-dangerious Scuba Ed regards sharks, the dude who lived with bears ended up being eaten by bears. Ed, bears, sharks, and terrorists have two things in common: They all have no regard how you view them ... and they all taste great when served with the right sauce.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:56:00 PM EDT
Should have gotten on the shark,why paddle when there's a perfectly good shark going the same way????
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 6:05:07 PM EDT
There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 8:22:27 PM EDT
She needed Brody and his M1.
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