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Posted: 3/26/2006 8:56:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 8:59:20 PM EDT by m4hk33]
the polar bear has the upper hand



the malamute makes his move



and the polar bear is down for the count



pretty cool pics that i came accross


edited to add another one that


Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:57:55 PM EDT
Thats a little baby bear, and one tough ass dog! Nice pics.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:59:07 PM EDT
The bear musn't have been hungry
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:59:48 PM EDT
Odd how how sometimes nature does a u-turn.

I saw on animal planet how a corn snake and a rat were "pals." The snake wouldn't kill and eat the rat, but coil around the rat for warmth and the rat would sleep there.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:00:03 PM EDT
Im guessing tame bear?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:00:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:02:25 PM EDT
They had those dogs at a NATO "sere" school I went too. It was called ILLRPS. Winter Survival With Resistance To Interrogation (sounds fun eh?) in Weingarten Germany

Woke up one morning with one sitting about 2 feet away just staring at me. Didnt bark or anything. I remember them telling us to not even think about running if one found us. No problem, that thing was intense.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:03:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 9:06:33 PM EDT by WildBoar]
looks like the dog and bear are buds and are playing.

ETA

As the big bear began walking, all the dogs erupted into angry barking and growling. All the dogs, that is, except one. One dog didn't act aggressively toward the approaching polar bear at all. In fact, he was acting like he was happy to see the huge predator, easily 10 times his own size. Instead of barking aggressively, this one dog started wagging its tail and jumping around excitedly. Noticing the non-aggressive posture of this particular dog, the polar bear ignored the other 39 barking sets of bared teeth and made his way directly to this one dog.

Both were a bit tentative at first. But after getting "acquainted," they began to play like two puppies. At no time was there the least bit of aggression from either the dog or the bear. It seemed that they were genuinely happy to see each other. Almost like they were old friends. They played together for about 10 minutes, when another amazing thing happened. The polar bear laid down near the dog and rolled over on his back. In the animal kingdom, especially in the world of predators such as bears and dogs, rolling over onto your back is a totally submissive posture. Dominance between individuals is decided in this way. So here's a 700 to 800 pound fully wild adult male polar bear submitting to a 75 to 80 pound, tethered dog. It was an amazing sight.

Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:03:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 9:18:37 PM EDT by m4hk33]
conclusion of the secon match






polar bears apear to be wild
the story is at this link
http://www.blueiceberg.com/nature/nature38.htm
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:07:45 PM EDT
Winter Survival With Resistance To Interrogation

GOD that would blow, i did the survival package at bridgport CA and it sucked, that would be worse on so many levels. Props go out to you.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:09:02 PM EDT
thats pretty unbelievable; malamutes are big dogs, and tough too (I used to have one, he weighed about 160 lbs and could pull me, dad, and mom all at once on a dog sled) but polar bears are HUGE, and from what I've heard not too friendly...

now I want to see the video
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:31:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WildBoar:
looks like the dog and bear are buds and are playing.



+1

Hungry Polar Bear eats anything it wants. Period.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 9:52:33 PM EDT
TAG
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:04:58 PM EDT
Inter-species love,ain't that sweet!
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:11:48 PM EDT
That is really cool.

When I was stationed in Greenland (Thule, AB), we had standing orders to shoot any polar bears that came onto base (after calling for backup...and from the inside of a vehicle).

The Danes there said they're some of the most agressive animals on the planet. I never got to see one though.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:21:40 PM EDT
im sure that the polar bear could easily take the dog out, i just find it soo cool that the dog was not spooked of another predator that was 10 times his size,


from the excrept, it apears the other dogs were not intimadated either
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:26:48 PM EDT
tagged for later
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:34:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 10:35:34 PM EDT by headspace]

Originally Posted By m4hk33:
im sure that the polar bear could easily take the dog out, i just find it soo cool that the dog was not spooked of another predator that was 10 times his size,


from the excrept, it apears the other dogs were not intimadated either



stuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuupid dogs
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 3:40:19 AM EDT
although this doesnt pertain to alaskan malamutes, i read that at yellow stone, they were some 20 intereactions between wolves and bears, the majority of those interactions end without a physical attacks.just displays of agression. in half those encountors, the much smaller wolves were able to get the Black and Grizzly bears to back down to them. single femal wolves protecting their den have been witnessed runing off those blood thirsty, Godless killings machines,

stupid, yes, but i guess attitude goes a long way in the animal kingdom
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:46:09 AM EDT
on another note, if a malamute and a polar bear can play toghether, i wonder if the Sunni's and Shia will ever be able to stop killing each other and come into the 21st century?

maybe theres hope, maybe not?
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:46:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 6:49:24 AM EDT by muddydog]
when i was doing bear research..back in college.

i remember reading about polar bears..

kinda strange, it is common place for polar bears of all sizes to be seen laying or playing with sled dogs..

of course..

it was common place for a bear to kill a dog as well..

polar bears are one of the most intelligent animals in the world. only a select few zoos are certified to have them on display and to get certification, the facility must meet certain standards as well as a zoo keeper that has done a residency at another zoo that is polar bear certified.

the size, intelligence and speed of the bears allows for no room for error in dealing with them.

it is also very common for inuits to hunt them with .222 and .223 rifles..( 4real). of course they used 6-12 dogs to bay them and take only head shots.


it is/was not uncommon for sled dogs to kill and eat young children..
all children are watched closely and the dogs are not socialized with a family like we do..
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:51:06 AM EDT
That polar bear just failed the last test of it's police training.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 6:52:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By m4hk33:
im sure that the polar bear could easily take the dog out, i just find it soo cool that the dog was not spooked of another predator that was 10 times his size,


from the excrept, it apears the other dogs were not intimadated either



There's 10 other dogs off camera..................... they sent the little one into investigate...............

Meanwhile "wolfie" is telling the other dogs, if that big thing attacks "Fred" We're all in, get it.............
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:00:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:32:24 AM EDT
interesting, I always heard the opposit of them not socialing their dogs with the family, I though that nordic dogs poor ability to be a guard dog was the results of living and working with hummans over generations.

i have even read in some dog breed books that in the past Alaskan Malmutes were left back at the villiage to protect children form wild animals,
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:49:26 AM EDT
Those are awesome pics.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:57:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By m4hk33:
on another note, if a malamute and a polar bear can play toghether, i wonder if the Sunni's and Shia will ever be able to stop killing each other and come into the 21st century?

maybe theres hope, maybe not?


Malamutes and polar bears must be more civilized...
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:05:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:05:44 AM EDT by Grunteled]
Bears are fairly smart and pretty quirky too. Sometimes you can make them back down, sometimes they'll play, sometimes they kill and eat you. I have no doubt they are curious and playful, but that can change QUICKLY. I also have no doubt outside real hunger they'll back out of a fight with a large dog. Dogs can still injure and must put on the fight face of a lifetime to confront a bear. The bear often may not be interested enough to get involved in a fight over what got it's attention in the first place. Animals often won't fight unless they perceive they have to
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:23:34 AM EDT
last time I got into a fight with a polar bear, he rolled over after two rounds
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:27:31 AM EDT
That's so cool, thanks for the pics.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:35:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By m4hk33:
although this doesnt pertain to alaskan malamutes, i read that at yellow stone, they were some 20 intereactions between wolves and bears, the majority of those interactions end without a physical attacks.just displays of agression. in half those encountors, the much smaller wolves were able to get the Black and Grizzly bears to back down to them. single femal wolves protecting their den have been witnessed runing off those blood thirsty, Godless killings machines,

stupid, yes, but i guess attitude goes a long way in the animal kingdom



Ever come across a mountain lion or aggressive dog? Get pissed. You're the head honcho and you're not taking any shit from them. 90% of the time, they get the message and back off.

The other 10% of the time you'd better be able to back it up.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:19:54 AM EDT
yeah, but even armed, if i ran into a polar bear with anything les than a 50 BMG, I may shit a brick, those suckers are huge, yes the may be able to be taken down with a 223, with a perfect head shot, but im not chancing it
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