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Posted: 3/26/2006 6:03:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/26/2006 6:03:45 AM EDT by Midnight-Sniper]
I was working out in the yard and got pitch (pine tar) on my pants. Unfortunately, I didn't realize it until after I sat on our leather couch. How do you remove this stuff without ruining the couch?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:20:52 AM EDT
Off ( insect repellent) will remove Pine Tar. Don't know what it may do to the leather ?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:22:14 AM EDT
kerosene or "goof off", same thing. Works good, but test in an area you can't see first.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:26:13 AM EDT
Id say the Goof Off, it does wonders and is inexpensive to boot
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:32:35 AM EDT
I'd be careful with the goof off or any other chemical, you'll likely take off the color in the leather. Instead of ending with a light spot in your couch from the chemical, I'd rather coat the rest of the couch in pitch.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:34:36 AM EDT
I use mineral spirits to clean leather of small stains like that. No Problems.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:34:52 AM EDT
I am in the asphalt bizz. The best thing I have found to date to cut any kind of emulsion or pitch is called Orange Gel Degreaser from Zep Manufacturing, the stuff I use is an industrial grade and will insatntly cut all of the above. They sell a less potent version at Lowes and Home Depot. YOU may want to try in on a test spot first. The industrial grade is wicked strong and will remove many finishes and paints, or the color from dyed leather (ask me how I know)
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:38:19 AM EDT
Acetone (Nail polish remover) works great....just be sure to try it on an area of the couch that isn't seen first...to make sure it won't affect color of leather.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:47:18 AM EDT
I've had great luck using plain vegetable oil.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:50:45 AM EDT
whatever you decide to try, make sure you try scrubbing with it in a small spot somewhere you cant see! (like on the back)
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 6:58:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FatMan:
I've had great luck using plain vegetable oil.



Yes. Slow, but safe.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:14:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By INI:
I use mineral spirits to clean leather of small stains like that. No Problems.



+1
I've used it to clean tar off the seat of my Crapillac with no problems. Mineral spirits, AKA paint thinner, is pretty mild stuff.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:32:43 AM EDT
Dry cleaning fluid (Perchloroethylene). Go see your friendly local dry cleaner and bring a small squeeze bottle and see if they'll give you some. They use squeeze bottles of it for working on trouble spots.

aa
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:33:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By aa777888-2:
Dry cleaning fluid (Perchloroethylene). Go see your friendly local dry cleaner and bring a small squeeze bottle and see if they'll give you some. They use squeeze bottles of it for working on trouble spots.

aa



Brake Cleaner is the same thing.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 8:35:42 AM EDT
BTW, I am in woodworking and we use ABC Belt cleaner, AKA Caustic Soda, to remove pine tar. I don't know how it would do with leather but it will soften your fingernails and burn any part of your skin besides your hands. Works though
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:38:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jmarkma:

Originally Posted By aa777888-2:
Dry cleaning fluid (Perchloroethylene). Go see your friendly local dry cleaner and bring a small squeeze bottle and see if they'll give you some. They use squeeze bottles of it for working on trouble spots.

aa



Brake Cleaner is the same thing.



Only if you get the 100% Trichloroethylene brake cleaner, so be careful what you buy.

aa
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:41:18 AM EDT
WD-40 on a clean rag
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