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Posted: 3/23/2006 9:15:48 AM EDT
How strong is this stuff? Strong enough to make lug nuts?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duralumin
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:22:52 AM EDT
Dude, that is just the old fashion term for our modern high strength alloys like 2000 series.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:24:18 AM EDT
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:25:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 9:26:09 AM EDT by Keith_J]

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
How strong is this stuff? Strong enough to make lug nuts?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duralumin



Only on your Tonka truck. It has a BIG problem, that being corrosion. While pure aluminum is quite stable in even marine environments, the alloying elements used in duraluminum make it corrode rapidly even in most rainwater. Airplanes typically use this alloy family but protection from corrosion is through use of Alclad, that is 2000 series that have been co-rolled with a bonded sheet of pure aluminum.

Threaded fasteners made of aluminum, even 7075, have poor cycle life. They are at best, one time use fasteners.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:25:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:27:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?

Star Wars is ghey sci-fi. Star Trek is cool. Star Wars was nothing more than sci fi western and such melding of genre is uber ghey. Unpimp ze Star Wars...
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:31:10 AM EDT
Did you read the link?

From what it says, duraluminum is what is commonly know as Aerospace/Aircraft grade aluminum.

It also says that 2011/14/24 are used for hardware, so I would say that you could use it for lugs nuts, but why not just use steel like everyone else? It is also likely exspensive.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:39:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 9:40:56 AM EDT by Soylent]
Aluminum fasteners to hold your hard drive in your case is okay. Aluminum fasteners to hold the wheels on your car doing 80 MPH down the freeway....not so much. When all is said and done, aluminum does not have the strength of steel and will strip threads off very easily.

*ETA*
This is just my opinion on it. There are outfits that make aluminum lug nuts, and they apparently work fine. I personally wouldn't trust them though.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:40:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?

Star Wars is ghey sci-fi. Star Trek is cool. Star Wars was nothing more than sci fi western and such melding of genre is uber ghey. Unpimp ze Star Wars...



"Hello computer."
"Just use the keyboard"
"Ah, the keyboard. How quaint."

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:41:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?



That must be Star Wars...transparent aluminum was Star Trek...remember in STIV when Scotty gives the guy the formula for it in exchange for the plexiglass?
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:43:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FunYun1983:
Did you read the link?

From what it says, duraluminum is what is commonly know as Aerospace/Aircraft grade aluminum.

It also says that 2011/14/24 are used for hardware, so I would say that you could use it for lugs nuts, but why not just use steel like everyone else? It is also likely exspensive.



Yes, you COULD make lug nuts from 2000 series BUT they wouldn't last long. Aluminum has a finite stress limit, that means no matter how little stress you put on it, it will eventually fatigue and fail.

Yes, Kawasaki makes sintered aluminum valve springs for some of their bikes but that is still a trade secret. Lug nuts are threaded and due to the VAST differences in moduli of elasticity between the steel stud and aluminum nut, the threads will soon fail.

Look us strength of materials and machine element design, paying particular attention to fatigue life. Also note lug nuts are subject to wheel torque since that is a sliding vector. Right handed threads on the left side of a vehicle tend to loosen while those on the right side tighten. Most light trucks and cars use right handed threading on all wheels but larger trucks have and some older Chryslers had left handed threads on the left side for this purpose.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:52:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 9:59:45 AM EDT by markmars]

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
How strong is this stuff? Strong enough to make lug nuts?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duralumin



I have tent poles made of Duralumin strong and light weight.

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:29:30 AM EDT
Strong enough to hold together a hundred tons of Zeppelin
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:48:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pzjgr:

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?



That must be Star Wars...transparent aluminum was Star Trek...remember in STIV when Scotty gives the guy the formula for it in exchange for the plexiglass?



Yes, star trek


BUT..........they have invented transparent aluminum
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 11:20:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Soylent:
Aluminum fasteners to hold your hard drive in your case is okay. Aluminum fasteners to hold the wheels on your car doing 80 MPH down the freeway....not so much. When all is said and done, aluminum does not have the strength of steel and will strip threads off very easily.

*ETA*
This is just my opinion on it. There are outfits that make aluminum lug nuts, and they apparently work fine. I personally wouldn't trust them though.



I'd trust them ok in a permanent installation, if I could see the numbers. However, I would pick something else for a lug nut, or something else that I'm likely to remove/install often. Aluminum fasteners gall like a mo-fo. The first time bubba gets after it wiff uh im-pak reench, they'll be stuck fir good!
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 11:26:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?

Star Wars is ghey sci-fi. Star Trek is cool. Star Wars was nothing more than sci fi western and such melding of genre is uber ghey. Unpimp ze Star Wars...



Never seen Firefly I guess...


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 12:01:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jthuang:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



Transparisteel? Or is that Star Wars?



I was thinking of Wonder Woman and her invisible plane.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 12:17:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



You do know that stuff exists, right?


Link Posted: 3/23/2006 12:19:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lord_Grey_Boots:

Originally Posted By pzjgr:
Not as strong as transparent aluminum....



You do know that stuff exists, right?

www.rense.com/1.imagesC/clearalum.jpg



Yeah, I heard that...but somehow I don't think its the same as the Star Trek transparent aluminum!

But cool nonetheless....
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 3:21:56 PM EDT
Porsche has been using aluminum lug nuts for decades. I trust them north of 130 mph.

First, aluminum alloys can be both pretty hard and pretty strong.

Second, the nut alloy doesn't need to be nearly as strong as the bolt. Actually, you'll normally want your nut to be made of a weaker material than your bolt.

Duraluminum would probably be a fine alloy for lug nuts, so long as it was anodized. I wouldn't use them on steel wheels.
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