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Posted: 3/22/2006 3:57:55 PM EDT
i wont be able to get to a tire shop untill saturday and was wondering if it would be ok to drive the next 2 days to work and back with it, about 40 miles. there doesnt seem to be any leakage at the moment but i dont want to yank it to see if it'll be a leaker or not.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:59:38 PM EDT
Keep on a truckin'. Ive seen peopel go MONTHS with a nail, and just kept putting air in when needed.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:59:50 PM EDT
As long as it doesn't go flat, keep driving it.

Or, go to the local walmart/target/napa/etc and get a plug kit. Pull out the nail, plug it, air it up to proper pressure, and then don't worry.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:00:40 PM EDT
There's really no way of knowing how long that tire will last. It could last till saturday or it might flat out while youre on the road. I think walmart has do it yourself flat fixers (same thing the tire shop uses).
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:00:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:
Keep on a truckin'. Ive seen peopel go MONTHS with a nail, and just kept putting air in when needed.



+1 just keep putting air in it when its low. Ive went a few weeks once last summer with a nail in my tire.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:00:59 PM EDT
You may go months, depending on the seal.

You may wake up tomorrow and, it'll be flat.

Take your cheap ass to a shop and get you're tire plugged.

Takes about an hour on average.

You DON'T want to have that thing go flat about the 20 mile mark on your way to/from
work.

I work strikes....Beleive me....I've seen nails in tires, ok?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:02:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BarnStormer:
As long as it doesn't go flat, keep driving it.

Or, go to the local walmart/target/napa/etc and get a plug kit. Pull out the nail, plug it, air it up to proper pressure, and then don't worry.



+1. The kit's cheap and it takes all of about 90 seconds to use it.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:02:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BarnStormer:
As long as it doesn't go flat, keep driving it.

Or, go to the local walmart/target/napa/etc and get a plug kit. Pull out the nail, plug it, air it up to proper pressure, and then don't worry.



+1

Plugs are really easy to install and probably take less time than the wait in line to check out.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:04:38 PM EDT
A nail, you light weight.

I've been known to drive around with a torpedo
in my tire.

Then again, I started it.


GM
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:07:00 PM EDT
Plug it
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:08:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Trey-W:

Originally Posted By BarnStormer:
As long as it doesn't go flat, keep driving it.

Or, go to the local walmart/target/napa/etc and get a plug kit. Pull out the nail, plug it, air it up to proper pressure, and then don't worry.



+1

Plugs are really easy to install and probably take less time than the wait in line to check out.



+1
I had a flat this morning when I went out to the car to go to work. I pulled out the nail, plugged it, and I wasnt even late for work.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:46:13 PM EDT
Right after hurricane k we had to go to all our locations located in the worst areas hit by K and it was driving thru water and all kinds of stuff. In less than a month I had to replace 3 tires and about 4 flats. It still is bad.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:51:57 PM EDT
On an old work van (construction), I had to break down and get new tires, they were bald, really bald. The guy who changed them couldn't belive they were still holding air because one of the front tires had seventeen nails in it.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:52:13 PM EDT
I probably am going to get slamed for this but....

At best, a plug should be considered a temporary repair until you can get a proper repair. There are at least three issues when it comes to tires, air pressure and repairs. First, you need to maintain proper air pressure in tires. If you operate a tire with less than proper air pressure, you run the risk of the tire failing in ways you will not like. Nails and similar punctures are a source of air pressure loss. Occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the tire will "seal" around the nail and have a slow leak. When you pull the nail out, you have a hole and a full fledged leak and the tire goes flat. Also occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the nail does not penetrate the air chamber and you have no leak. In that case if you remove the nail you will not have a leak but you may have some other problems- more about that. One of the issues you may have with a nail in the tire is what kind of physical damage is the nail doing on the inside of the tire each time it rolls through the footprint. To know for sure, you need to dismount the tire and look inside. That gets us to the subject of repairs. When you get a puncture, you usually get two types of damage. One to the tire casing and the other to the air chamber. To do a proper repair, you need to fix both.

For the air chamber, a patch on the inner liner is usually correct. For the casing, a "plug" - not the rope plug or string plug you apply from the outside but a plug applied from the inside. The hole will need to be preped and a round solid rubber plug cemented in place to seal the tire body ply from moisture wicking from the hole into the body material. This moisture will cause material detachments and the tire will fail. A properly applied plug / patch combination will totally seal the puncture point and the tire should last. Just remember, if the tire has a speed rating, once repaired, it may lose the speed rating. To find out for sure, you need to check with the tire's manufacturer.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:54:11 PM EDT
It would probably be safer to put your spare on
then get your tire fixed or replaced asap.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:56:00 PM EDT
Was it really from a nail? Or a spike strip?


Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:26:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TnRedneck:
I probably am going to get slamed for this but....

At best, a plug should be considered a temporary repair until you can get a proper repair. There are at least three issues when it comes to tires, air pressure and repairs. First, you need to maintain proper air pressure in tires. If you operate a tire with less than proper air pressure, you run the risk of the tire failing in ways you will not like. Nails and similar punctures are a source of air pressure loss. Occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the tire will "seal" around the nail and have a slow leak. When you pull the nail out, you have a hole and a full fledged leak and the tire goes flat. Also occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the nail does not penetrate the air chamber and you have no leak. In that case if you remove the nail you will not have a leak but you may have some other problems- more about that. One of the issues you may have with a nail in the tire is what kind of physical damage is the nail doing on the inside of the tire each time it rolls through the footprint. To know for sure, you need to dismount the tire and look inside. That gets us to the subject of repairs. When you get a puncture, you usually get two types of damage. One to the tire casing and the other to the air chamber. To do a proper repair, you need to fix both.

For the air chamber, a patch on the inner liner is usually correct. For the casing, a "plug" - not the rope plug or string plug you apply from the outside but a plug applied from the inside. The hole will need to be preped and a round solid rubber plug cemented in place to seal the tire body ply from moisture wicking from the hole into the body material. This moisture will cause material detachments and the tire will fail. A properly applied plug / patch combination will totally seal the puncture point and the tire should last. Just remember, if the tire has a speed rating, once repaired, it may lose the speed rating. To find out for sure, you need to check with the tire's manufacturer.



This man speaks the truth, a plug is a temporary stop gap measure at best. NO resposible professional in the tire industry will install a push through plug in an over the highway vehicle.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 10:46:46 PM EDT
once the "head" wears off it will go through and then flat.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 11:01:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bgenlvtex:

Originally Posted By TnRedneck:
I probably am going to get slamed for this but....

At best, a plug should be considered a temporary repair until you can get a proper repair. There are at least three issues when it comes to tires, air pressure and repairs. First, you need to maintain proper air pressure in tires. If you operate a tire with less than proper air pressure, you run the risk of the tire failing in ways you will not like. Nails and similar punctures are a source of air pressure loss. Occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the tire will "seal" around the nail and have a slow leak. When you pull the nail out, you have a hole and a full fledged leak and the tire goes flat. Also occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the nail does not penetrate the air chamber and you have no leak. In that case if you remove the nail you will not have a leak but you may have some other problems- more about that. One of the issues you may have with a nail in the tire is what kind of physical damage is the nail doing on the inside of the tire each time it rolls through the footprint. To know for sure, you need to dismount the tire and look inside. That gets us to the subject of repairs. When you get a puncture, you usually get two types of damage. One to the tire casing and the other to the air chamber. To do a proper repair, you need to fix both.

For the air chamber, a patch on the inner liner is usually correct. For the casing, a "plug" - not the rope plug or string plug you apply from the outside but a plug applied from the inside. The hole will need to be preped and a round solid rubber plug cemented in place to seal the tire body ply from moisture wicking from the hole into the body material. This moisture will cause material detachments and the tire will fail. A properly applied plug / patch combination will totally seal the puncture point and the tire should last. Just remember, if the tire has a speed rating, once repaired, it may lose the speed rating. To find out for sure, you need to check with the tire's manufacturer.



This man speaks the truth, a plug is a temporary stop gap measure at best. NO resposible professional in the tire industry will install a push through plug in an over the highway vehicle.



I worked at a tire shop in college and couldn't agree more. The largest thing I ever took out of a tire was a rail road spike. The guy who brought his truck in stated he had a little leak and a tire vibration at high speeds. Said he had been driving on it for weeks.

Also, stay away from Fix-a-Flat. It eats up the inside of the tire.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 11:43:51 PM EDT
I went about 9 months, they wouldn't plug it because it was CLOSE to the side wall, not in the the side wall at all. Once winder rolled around I put the spare on. The cold let the metal nail shrink enough to let air out
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 11:49:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:15:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TnRedneck:
I probably am going to get slamed for this but....

At best, a plug should be considered a temporary repair until you can get a proper repair. There are at least three issues when it comes to tires, air pressure and repairs. First, you need to maintain proper air pressure in tires. If you operate a tire with less than proper air pressure, you run the risk of the tire failing in ways you will not like. Nails and similar punctures are a source of air pressure loss. Occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the tire will "seal" around the nail and have a slow leak. When you pull the nail out, you have a hole and a full fledged leak and the tire goes flat. Also occasionally, in the case of a nail in the tire, the nail does not penetrate the air chamber and you have no leak. In that case if you remove the nail you will not have a leak but you may have some other problems- more about that. One of the issues you may have with a nail in the tire is what kind of physical damage is the nail doing on the inside of the tire each time it rolls through the footprint. To know for sure, you need to dismount the tire and look inside. That gets us to the subject of repairs. When you get a puncture, you usually get two types of damage. One to the tire casing and the other to the air chamber. To do a proper repair, you need to fix both.

For the air chamber, a patch on the inner liner is usually correct. For the casing, a "plug" - not the rope plug or string plug you apply from the outside but a plug applied from the inside. The hole will need to be preped and a round solid rubber plug cemented in place to seal the tire body ply from moisture wicking from the hole into the body material. This moisture will cause material detachments and the tire will fail. A properly applied plug / patch combination will totally seal the puncture point and the tire should last. Just remember, if the tire has a speed rating, once repaired, it may lose the speed rating. To find out for sure, you need to check with the tire's manufacturer.




I totally agree, but I'm sorry...... That right there is funny I don't care who ya are.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:26:40 PM EDT
I am trying to decide if you are up late just getting in or up early just going out. Since I feel the way about morning that I do- I trust it is the former. The three issues I was thinking about are
1. Maintaining proper air pressure,
2. Repairing the casing, and
3. Repairing the air chamber.

All three are important.
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