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Posted: 3/22/2006 5:19:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 5:20:05 AM EDT by Zarathustra1]
Does it bother anyone else that such an obnoxious sentement is on the Statue of Liberty?

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


Actually I'm a bit scared to ask...

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:22:14 AM EDT
Nope.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:25:51 AM EDT
It says:

We don't want your great people, the people who create civilizations--they might rock the boat here. We want your human refuse, the people who for whatever reason cannon function in your society...
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:30:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 5:31:03 AM EDT by Zarathustra1]
Perhaps it should be the motto of the INS...

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:37:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
It says:

We don't want your great people, the people who create civilizations--they might rock the boat here. We want your human refuse, the people who for whatever reason cannon function in your society...



Actually no, what it's saying is, the "elite" nobility of Europe is stagnant and dead, unable to do anything but watch their civilization crumble around their ears. The common people seeking a better life, who have the bold spirit to come to America and try for something better, THEY are the future, the ones who want to build something new.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:40:49 AM EDT
Is it still appropriate?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:44:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:52:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.



This country was founded on breaking laws to obtain freedom, and that is the emotion the poem implies--freedom at any cost.

And to expect people to not try and reshape the country how they see best, is obviously naive. You can see it every day.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:57:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.



This country was founded on breaking laws to obtain freedom, and that is the emotion the poem implies--freedom at any cost.

And to expect people to not try and reshape the country how they see best, is obviously naive. You can see it every day.



Wrong on both counts. This country was built on MAKING laws that were fair to everyone, regardless of station. And the immigrants that came to Ellis Island in the 1900s didn't try to remake the country in the image of their former homes, they became Americans.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:00:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.



This country was founded on breaking laws to obtain freedom, and that is the emotion the poem implies--freedom at any cost.

And to expect people to not try and reshape the country how they see best, is obviously naive. You can see it every day.



Wrong on both counts. This country was built on MAKING laws that were fair to everyone, regardless of station. And the immigrants that came to Ellis Island in the 1900s didn't try to remake the country in the image of their former homes, they became Americans.



I meant British laws.

So you feel it is still appropriate for todays (non European) immigrants?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:17:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.



This country was founded on breaking laws to obtain freedom, and that is the emotion the poem implies--freedom at any cost.

And to expect people to not try and reshape the country how they see best, is obviously naive. You can see it every day.



Wrong on both counts. This country was built on MAKING laws that were fair to everyone, regardless of station. And the immigrants that came to Ellis Island in the 1900s didn't try to remake the country in the image of their former homes, they became Americans.



I meant British laws.

So you feel it is still appropriate for todays (non European) immigrants?




As I already said, as long as they come legally and don't try to change the US to be like the country they left.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:38:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:

Originally Posted By RikWriter:

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Is it still appropriate?



Yes. As long as they put in the effort to come here legally, and they don't try to recreate the US in the image of the place from which they're escaping.



This country was founded on breaking laws to obtain freedom, and that is the emotion the poem implies--freedom at any cost.

And to expect people to not try and reshape the country how they see best, is obviously naive. You can see it every day.



The problem lies in the fact that certain people wish to change take over this nation, not contribute to it like those that came before.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:49:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Does it bother anyone else that such an obnoxious sentement is on the Statue of Liberty?

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


Actually I'm a bit scared to ask...





"I know Imbroglio and you Sir are no Imbroglio..."
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:49:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
Does it bother anyone else that such an obnoxious sentement is on the Statue of Liberty?

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


Actually I'm a bit scared to ask...




It is an obnoxious statement that the Staue of Libetry was created as a beacon of hope that men could escape slavery and come to a land where they could carve their OWN destinies, free of fuedalism, despotism, nationalism and the tyranny of the Divine Right of Kings, no matter the philosophy under which it was practiced?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:51:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 6:51:58 AM EDT by Tomislav]

Originally Posted By Zarathustra1:
It says:

We don't want your great people, the people who create civilizations--they might rock the boat here. We want your human refuse, the people who for whatever reason cannon function in your society...



Unless you come from aristocracy, odds are that your forefathers were shitkickers when they moved to America. Somehow, the republic survived.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:55:59 AM EDT
So who wrote it??

The french or the americans????
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 7:01:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Only_Hits_Count:
So who wrote it??

The french or the americans????



Emma Lazarus, American.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 7:19:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 7:21:01 AM EDT by Zarathustra1]
So, as long as they fill out their paperwork, and, I don't know, sign a release form stating they will leave their culture behind them, then full, unrestricted, legal immigration from Mexico would be in perfect accord with Emma's poem and those who have posted here so far? All who want to come are more than welcome.

We are the refuse receptacle of the world. We can recycle anything!?

By the way, it is apples and oranges comparing European immigration to America up until the early 20th century to the 3rd-world immigration which is favored now; any honest person knows that.

Emma's poem is a nice, pretty thought. No wonder it came from a woman's mind. But is it still appropriate today? How much more refuse do we need?



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