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Posted: 3/20/2006 2:00:40 PM EDT
So, can someone explain to me the allure of HAM radio? I don't get it. Just a bunch of guys talking together over a radio. OK.

In the not-so-distant past, I could see why someone would look to get into it. Before the days of cell phones, one HAM operator showed me how he could dial his radio to a particular frequency and get a dial-tone through a device that let them place phone calls. That, I understand. But like I said, that was before the cell phone days.

Additionally, some people without access to reliable phone service (clean lines) used to attach TNC's (terminal node controllers) to their computers and use them much like modems. Again, back in the day, I can understand the purpose.

Depending upon which SHTF scenario you are planning for, they could prove useless (in the case of a nuclear detontation).

So, what is about them that I don't get?
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:13:09 PM EDT
I use mine when I go shooting where cell phones are worthless. I can hit a repeater almost anywhere in the state with My 2 meter radio. Also in the event of a major power outage/disaster I would like to contact my family. I can do this with radio while you are attempting to get through on your cell phone like everyone else... good luck. Its a great back up communication tool. I dont use mine for a "hobby" I use it for a tool to communicate.


Mark.

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:19:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:22:08 PM EDT
Im getting my amature license this summer
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:25:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 2:25:54 PM EDT by R-32]
I am a 9-1-1 dispatcher, and a Vol Firefighter...

I can tell you for a fact, when the shtf.... cell phones are like a firearm with no ammo...
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:26:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:
After several emergency drills and one actual disaster (small tornado) it was determined that cell phones are not a reliable option for emergency communications. During these situations, the cell sites were so overloaded that cell communication was useless.



I can understand their use in this scenario. Probably should have thought more about it.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:27:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kalahnikid:
Im getting my amature license this summer



I understand there are two types of licenses ... code and no-code. Which license are you getting?
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:37:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fatk1d:
So, can someone explain to me the allure of HAM radio? I don't get it. Just a bunch of guys talking together over a radio. OK.

In the not-so-distant past, I could see why someone would look to get into it. Before the days of cell phones, one HAM operator showed me how he could dial his radio to a particular frequency and get a dial-tone through a device that let them place phone calls. That, I understand. But like I said, that was before the cell phone days.

Additionally, some people without access to reliable phone service (clean lines) used to attach TNC's (terminal node controllers) to their computers and use them much like modems. Again, back in the day, I can understand the purpose.

Depending upon which SHTF scenario you are planning for, they could prove useless (in the case of a nuclear detontation).

So, what is about them that I don't get?



It's a hobby. Lots of us like experimenting with digital modes of communication like PSK31, building our own transmitters and receivers, experimenting with antenna designs and computer based antenna modeling.

I can't imagine why a nuclear detonation would make amateur radio useless. Even if all my radios were destroyed, I could build a working transmitter and receiver from scavenged parts. Depending on what my objectives were, that might include radios that run on a 9v battery and can transmit to most of the world.

Amateur radio helps create new communications technologies and to do basic research and design that can later be applied to commercial, military, or other applications. Packet radio led directly to commercial wireless computer networking. Amateurs were using wireless networks in the early 1980s, and fifteen to twenty years later it finally started to make headway as a commercial application.

Communications in times of emergency can be provided by trained amateur radio operators who participate in ARES, RACES, SATERN, and other emergency response groups. Backup and secondary communications for first responders (police, fire, EMS, emergency managment) is also an important role filled by ARES and RACES. Some amateur radio ops volunteer as weather spotters, providing an invaluable service to the National Weather Service and NOAA.

Amateur radio is far from being an outdated hobby. It is growing and will remain relevant for the forseeable future.

Jim
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:42:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fatk1d:

Originally Posted By Kalahnikid:
Im getting my amature license this summer



I understand there are two types of licenses ... code and no-code. Which license are you getting?



Ask an expert, a couple buds and I are going to actually get all the info after we get out of school for summer and study up.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:42:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:

Originally Posted By fatk1d:
So, can someone explain to me the allure of HAM radio? I don't get it. Just a bunch of guys talking together over a radio. OK.

In the not-so-distant past, I could see why someone would look to get into it. Before the days of cell phones, one HAM operator showed me how he could dial his radio to a particular frequency and get a dial-tone through a device that let them place phone calls. That, I understand. But like I said, that was before the cell phone days.

Additionally, some people without access to reliable phone service (clean lines) used to attach TNC's (terminal node controllers) to their computers and use them much like modems. Again, back in the day, I can understand the purpose.

Depending upon which SHTF scenario you are planning for, they could prove useless (in the case of a nuclear detontation).

So, what is about them that I don't get?



It's a hobby. Lots of us like experimenting with digital modes of communication like PSK31, building our own transmitters and receivers, experimenting with antenna designs and computer based antenna modeling.

I can't imagine why a nuclear detonation would make amateur radio useless. Even if all my radios were destroyed, I could build a working transmitter and receiver from scavenged parts. Depending on what my objectives were, that might include radios that run on a 9v battery and can transmit to most of the world.

Amateur radio helps create new communications technologies and to do basic research and design that can later be applied to commercial, military, or other applications. Packet radio led directly to commercial wireless computer networking. Amateurs were using wireless networks in the early 1980s, and fifteen to twenty years later it finally started to make headway as a commercial application.

Communications in times of emergency can be provided by trained amateur radio operators who participate in ARES, RACES, SATERN, and other emergency response groups. Backup and secondary communications for first responders (police, fire, EMS, emergency managment) is also an important role filled by ARES and RACES. Some amateur radio ops volunteer as weather spotters, providing an invaluable service to the National Weather Service and NOAA.

Amateur radio is far from being an outdated hobby. It is growing and will remain relevant for the forseeable future.

Jim



I was assuming that there would be considerable radio interference just after a nuclear detonation? I guess this is not the case after all?
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:47:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By medicmandan:
After several emergency drills and one actual disaster (small tornado) it was determined that cell phones are not a reliable option for emergency communications. During these situations, the cell sites were so overloaded that cell communication was useless.



In any given emergency scenario, amatuer radio is the ONLY sure-fire method of maintaining communications. This was proven to great extent by Katrina. Damn few cellular towers were working due to either physical dammage, interupted eletrical power and fuel supply for the back up generator, or plain overloading.

People are unable to contact their loved ones, responders aren't able to contact their agencies, hospitals are unable to contact blood-banks and supply reserves, and a general absence of communications exists. Radio, operating on battery power works. With radio, critical communications can be passed to those with the capabiity to help.

As far as a nuclear SHTF scenario, it's actually quite simple to build a faraday cage to shield an electronic device from any EMP. EMP travels the path of least resistance, as does electrical power, and stands a much higher chance of incapacitating a device through the power lines or an antenna.

As a US Army MARS station, I passed quite a bit of emergency traffic via High Frequency Radio in the days after Katrina. I have a pretty good idea that it saved some lives. If my participation in amatuer radio should save even ONE life...it's time well spent.

I worked communications last fall after the Evansville IN tornado event that killed 26 people. The affected area had NO communications other than radio and I passed traffic for the Salvation Army helping to coordinate the delivery of meals and relief supplies to those affected. If I helped aliviate one persons suffering...it was time well spent.

My intrest in amatuer radio has led to many friendships with people of above average intelligence and a willingness to serve the community. I can't think of a group of people more willing to lend assistance to those in need, other than a lot of military folks, than ham radio operators. I'm proud to be associated with them.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:49:17 PM EDT
If you've ever been in a hurricane, you will quickly learn why. Plus, there is nothing better than the feeling of a perfectly propagated signal to cross the earth, and how many people do you know that literally bounce their own signal off of a satellite or moon and talk with somebody across the world.

The hobby is fun as hell, you meet good people in it too, plus, it proves to be a better way to be in touch with your friends. I haven't used my cell phone to talk to a friend since I've had my license, we all have tickets, radios and fancy a certain repeater here in Florida, and the repeater gives us coverage all the way from West Palm Beach to mile marker 1 in the keys.

Professional grade amateur radio is a fine institution!
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:00:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Originally Posted By medicmandan:
After several emergency drills and one actual disaster (small tornado) it was determined that cell phones are not a reliable option for emergency communications. During these situations, the cell sites were so overloaded that cell communication was useless.



In any given emergency scenario, amatuer radio is the ONLY sure-fire method of maintaining communications. This was proven to great extent by Katrina. Damn few cellular towers were working due to either physical dammage, interupted eletrical power and fuel supply for the back up generator, or plain overloading.

People are unable to contact their loved ones, responders aren't able to contact their agencies, hospitals are unable to contact blood-banks and supply reserves, and a general absence of communications exists. Radio, operating on battery power works. With radio, critical communications can be passed to those with the capabiity to help.

As far as a nuclear SHTF scenario, it's actually quite simple to build a faraday cage to shield an electronic device from any EMP. EMP travels the path of least resistance, as does electrical power, and stands a much higher chance of incapacitating a device through the power lines or an antenna.

As a US Army MARS station, I passed quite a bit of emergency traffic via High Frequency Radio in the days after Katrina. I have a pretty good idea that it saved some lives. If my participation in amatuer radio should save even ONE life...it's time well spent.

I worked communications last fall after the Evansville IN tornado event that killed 26 people. The affected area had NO communications other than radio and I passed traffic for the Salvation Army helping to coordinate the delivery of meals and relief supplies to those affected. If I helped aliviate one persons suffering...it was time well spent.

My intrest in amatuer radio has led to many friendships with people of above average intelligence and a willingness to serve the community. I can't think of a group of people more willing to lend assistance to those in need, other than a lot of military folks, than ham radio operators. I'm proud to be associated with them.



That MARS bit sounds interesting. I've never heard of it. I'll have to go look it up. Thanks.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:01:25 PM EDT
Look around for the local Amateur Radio Club. They can give the tests and give you some info on equipment to get you started.

KE4YTA

Former 05H & D, US Army Security Agency (South East Asian Games) 7th Radio Research Field Station. "Sam the Hogg" a long time ago in a place far far away.

Former 05C, USAV LTC John U.D. Page (AAKJ), USAV LT-529 (ABFD), Harbormaster's Office, Ft Eustis, VA (AAC2)


Sam
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:46:41 PM EDT
I'm in an emergency communications group. We assist our county in case of any disaster and communications failure. Last year public works was digging up in the hills somewhere and they cut a very valuable cable. All 911 and cell comms were down for 3 hours. We were the county's 911 on the corners and at the Emergency Operations Center.

I am also a Skywarn spotter for the National Weather Service as well as a CERT Team member.

Amateur radio was used extensively during Katrina when there weren't any communications. One guy in my group handled 250 health and welfare messages during one months time from down south. My group assisted with the communications at the local Red Cross Shelter which was a sports arena.

We are always having drills so we can be prepared.

There is a No Code Technician Class license. There is talk about removing the morse code requirement alltogether. I am a General Class which means I had to pass a Morse Code exam as well as another written test. It's one step below Extra Class and and one above Technician.

K7***
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 6:08:01 PM EDT
Telephone systems will go down or at least extremely unpredictable and unreliable after 10-15% of the receivers are off-hook. guess what happens in a large or larger earthquake. Everybody calls Momma or the Police and asks, "Did you feel it? Was that an earthquake?" Cell systems the same, and are probably even more susceptible to infrastructure damage.

Now that the numbers of people using dial-up is shrinking we don't have the computer users going to the earthquake sites on sial-up connections as much.

I've been doing this for 20 years now. members.aol.com/emcom4hosp/

and take a look at this one. This was a pre-planned haz-mat/mass casualty drill for the fire departments, police departments, ambulance companies and emergency medical systems hospitals in north Orange County. Less than an hour before the drill started a freight train hit a commuter train
members.aol.com/emcom4hosp/metro2.html and all the pre-staged and staging units shifted from drill to real on the fly. We had a county fire task force on scene in less than 5 minutes since it luckily it was enroute and only about 2 miles away. (I'm in a picture on that page. I'm not so much that big, but all those ladies were really that small)
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 6:14:42 PM EDT
My brother is a expert on hams and im wanting to learn, he has some cool 2 ways that are no biggger than a cell phone and have a very good range.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 6:15:02 PM EDT
Besides public service events and emergency training/drills, be sure to check out some other aspects of ham radio like:

1. Field Day and contesting

2. VHF/UHF SSB, weak signal stuff and grid square collecting

3. HF SSB, CW and data modes

4. HF message and traffic handling

Like the gun hobby, ham radio is a "big tent".
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 8:45:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fatk1d:

I was assuming that there would be considerable radio interference just after a nuclear detonation? I guess this is not the case after all?



The detonation itself will release a wideband pulse. This is the EMP that takes out lots of solid state electronics.

After detonation, if lots of debris are scattered into the atmosphere, it might alter (for a time) signal paths and absorbance, making it more difficult to predict what frequencies will be best to reach what areas. This will not prevent communication, since amateurs have bands from the low HF through microwave and even all the way to light. In a true SHTF scenario, lots of amateur equipment could be used on non-amateur bands if necessary.

Jim
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 9:40:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 9:42:20 PM EDT by Skibane]

Originally Posted By fatk1d:
some people without access to reliable phone service (clean lines) used to attach TNC's (terminal node controllers) to their computers and use them much like modems. Again, back in the day, I can understand the purpose.



To this day, getting your computer to communicate with the outside world depends on many factors that are completely beyond your control. There are dozens of political, economic or technical events that could deny your access to the internet, at the flip of a switch.

Since ham radio isn't at the mercy of established networks, commercial interests or political whims, it is immune to most of these potential weaknesses. It facilitates point-to-point communication in the strictest sense, without relying on anyone or anything else to make it happen (or prevent it from happening). It is the ultimate form of survivable communications, because all the required hardware is in the hands of the hams who are communicating.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 12:14:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By R-32:
I am a 9-1-1 dispatcher, and a Vol Firefighter...

I can tell you for a fact, when the shtf.... cell phones are like a firearm with no ammo...



+1. There is a reason the town has a HAM setup here at the Dispatch Center/EOC.

Forrest KB1xxx
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:58:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:02:15 AM EDT by GySgtD]
Besides the obvious post-disaster utility of amateur radio, it is also fun. Some of the things I do with amateur radio on a weekly basis:

-last saturday I chatted with a gent in England while driving down the road. It is always interesting to talk with people from other lands.

-Last Friday, I received St. Patrick's day greetings from Ireland, also while driving.

-Two weeks ago, I received close to three hundred post cards from around the world from people that I've spoken with.

-Most every week, those of us in the Survival Forum move away from the keyboard and have a radio net from coast to coast.

-I can send television signals with my radio, and the "coverage" area is considerably greater than regular broadcast TV. For instance, I was sending a picture of my self, and someone came back on frequency five seconds later and said "Great reception in Moscow". Yes, got the postcard (QSL card) to prove it.

-I brought my radio with me to Iraq, where I made about 1,800 contacts. Those were some pretty interesting conversations.

-On another occasion, I was in the Philippines without a cell phone. I was able to call back to Okinawa so that my bud could relay a message for me back to the Philippines.

-Where else can you talk to people deep in the jungles of Papua New Guinea, Guadalcanal, Vietnam, or Cambodia? I've done all of the above on numerous occasions.

Fun is obviously in the eyes of the beholder, but I think that a lot of people would enjoy it if they tried it.

My uber-tactical ham radio thread....Good reading.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 2:16:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PhatForrest:

Originally Posted By R-32:
I am a 9-1-1 dispatcher, and a Vol Firefighter...

I can tell you for a fact, when the shtf.... cell phones are like a firearm with no ammo...



+1. There is a reason the town has a HAM setup here at the Dispatch Center/EOC.

Forrest KB1xxx



Ours too.

Jim KC0xxx
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 2:18:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GySgtD:

-I brought my radio with me to Iraq, where I made about 1,800 contacts. Those were some pretty interesting conversations.



What radio did you take? Antenna setup? Power?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 2:50:48 PM EDT
If I had the money, I'd be all over HAM like a redneck on a neckbone.

I am really fascinated by radio. It's a big deal to me if I can pick up new radio stations on my Grundig. I love lying in bed at night trying to find new stations.

I once had a list of all the radio stations I had picked up. Don't know what happened to it, but it was well over 100. Heck, I regularly listen to radio stations out of Nashville, Louisville, Ft Wayne, Chicago, NYC, Richmond, Charlotte, Atlanta, St Louis.

Radio is cool.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:35:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 3:45:26 PM EDT by GySgtD]

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:

Originally Posted By GySgtD:

-I brought my radio with me to Iraq, where I made about 1,800 contacts. Those were some pretty interesting conversations.



What radio did you take? Antenna setup? Power?



-Yaesu FT-857
-LDG Z-100 tuner
-Radio Shack 25 amp power supply
-homebrew SSTV/PSK/RTTY interface
-100 watts on SSB, usually 50 or less on the digital modes
-homebrew dipole antenna, made from scrounged components (found the coax in a bunker, and the antenna feedpoint consisted of a scrounged widget that I found in a blown up steam generating plant)

Here is what my radio shack/office/barracks room looked like:

By the time I left, most of that wall was covered with QSL cards. Some people were very anxious to get Iraq confirmed; I'd get comments like "Please don't die until you send me your QSL".

One of the many SSTV pics I received, this one from Russia:


Source of scrounged materials:
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:54:18 PM EDT
why do people post on message boards?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:54:30 PM EDT
What exactly are QSL cards? Post cards sent as pictures over the radio?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:01:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 4:07:32 PM EDT by GySgtD]
QSL cards are postcard sized cards sent usually through the mail, to "confirm" a radio contact. It is a ham radio tradition, and is quite a hobby in and of itself.

Here is one that I received from Spain, which confirmed my contact with a "Special Event" station commerating the Wedding of the Crown Prince of Spain (on their wedding day):


On the reverse side, is all the pertinent information of the contact: frequency/power/date/time/my callsign/my signal report.

An example of my card, which I send in return:
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:07:29 PM EDT
I always wanted to do some NVIS ALE work, but all my money goes to shooting
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:16:43 AM EDT
Last night, another gun board that I'm a member of had a radio net on HF. There were about ten of us, ragchewing across the country.

Just think, when the world goes Mad Max and the internet goes TU, arfcommers could still keep in touch with the hive mind
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:32:10 AM EDT
Tagged!
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 9:40:59 AM EDT
Eh..... Fridays are always slow on the GD. Let's talk about something that I'm interested in...


<bump>
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 9:42:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GySgtD:
Eh..... Fridays are always slow on the GD. Let's talk about something that I'm interested in...


<bump>



You seen the IC-7000? Bought one last week for when I get my General
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 9:44:26 AM EDT
I heard about it. Got a pic?
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 9:50:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GySgtD:
I heard about it. Got a pic?



Not of mine, but:



The radio kicks ass, I've had some awesome 6 meter contacts, but I still like my Yaesu 897d more for ruggedness and quality.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 10:00:12 AM EDT
Putting it in your vehicle? That's where I do 99% of my operating. Last weekend was quite good for mobile to Europe contacts, BTW.

Antenna?

Link Posted: 3/24/2006 10:17:13 AM EDT
Nah, it's an emergency rig that sits on my computer desk. I have the HF side connected to a dipole and an antenna tuner, (tuned for 6m right now of course).

My truck rig is a Yaesu FT-7800r, an amazing radio. I bought it over the 8800r because I didn't need crossband repeat.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 10:41:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/24/2006 10:50:15 AM EDT by pcsutton]
DAMNIT.....I just found my next rig....I WANT an IC-7000 now.....thanks alot!!

What's another $1500 toy, eh?
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 2:32:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/24/2006 2:37:10 PM EDT by GySgtD]
Woo Hoo! I'm bored, and I have a photobucket account...



















Keyed my radio for too long. Smoked it...


View from my Iraq radio shack


Link Posted: 3/24/2006 11:36:32 PM EDT
You let the magic smoke out!! You know that you can never put it back in, don't you?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 11:59:21 AM EDT
OK, while getting more info for making a QRP/Emergency system, I'm curious, can one tune a full sized 1/2wave dipole all across the HF spectrum with those LDG tuners?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:08:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By w4klr:
I'm curious, can one tune a full sized 1/2wave dipole all across the HF spectrum with those LDG tuners?



Full size for what frequency?

I've heard that those tuners can tune a wet piece of string. Of course, the shorter the ½λ antenna at higher frequencies, the more inefficient it will be when used at lower frequencies - regardless of the "tuned" feedpoint impedance presented to your rig.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:10:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWS:

Originally Posted By w4klr:
I'm curious, can one tune a full sized 1/2wave dipole all across the HF spectrum with those LDG tuners?



Full size for what frequency?

I've heard that those tuners can tune a wet piece of string. Of course, the shorter the ½λ antenna at higher frequencies, the more inefficient it will be when used at lower frequencies - regardless of the "tuned" feedpoint impedance presented to your rig.



All the way from 160-10 is what I was looking for, or if there are any 160-10 dipoles on the market?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:26:59 PM EDT
I have an Alpha Delta DX-CC, 80-10m dipole. It's hung as an inverted-V from my tower.

It's a decent antenna, but it's a series of compromises. It's performance is relative to how it's erected, and its relationship to other objects and ground. It's also narrow-banded on 40 and 75/80m. You may get 100kHz out of it on 75m before you must use the tuner to "touch it up".

Alpha Delta

160m is a bit tricky if you live in a city. Obviously you'll need some real estate to erect a full-size 160m dipole. Plus, 160 is subject to man-made noise that is so common within populated areas.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:40:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWS:
I have an Alpha Delta DX-CC, 80-10m dipole. It's hung as an inverted-V from my tower.

It's a decent antenna, but it's a series of compromises. It's performance is relative to how it's erected, and its relationship to other objects and ground. It's also narrow-banded on 40 and 75/80m. You may get 100kHz out of it on 75m before you must use the tuner to "touch it up".

Alpha Delta

160m is a bit tricky if you live in a city. Obviously you'll need some real estate to erect a full-size 160m dipole. Plus, 160 is subject to man-made noise that is so common within populated areas.



Hm..

Well, I'm looking for a simple solution for a SHTF like last year with Wilma, I was out of power for almost a month, my city was out for almost 2 weeks, I am looking to get something small and effective however, I guess 160m wouldn't be great band anyway. I dunno.

So much to think about!
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:58:21 PM EDT
My wife at our shack, she's also an op !http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i195/KG5S/hamradio026.jpg
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 12:58:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 1:27:29 PM EDT by GySgtD]

Originally Posted By w4klr:
OK, while getting more info for making a QRP/Emergency system, I'm curious, can one tune a full sized 1/2wave dipole all across the HF spectrum with those LDG tuners?



The LDG Z-11, which I used about two hours ago, will tune my 20 meter dipole from 80 to 10 meters. Had no luck getting it to tune 160. Perhaps with a 80m dipole?

ETA> I should also say that I have not had as good luck with my other LDG tuner (I don't remember the model number, but it isn't a Z-100 as I previously mistakenly posted) trying to tune the same antenna with a 100 watt rig.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 1:18:04 PM EDT
Not much on the HF. But I have a UHF repeater on 444.575 connected to another UHF machine on 444.075. I also installed a 6 meter link on 52.570 (no tone) here in the Wheeling, WV area.

We have a Echolink node set-up under the KC8FZH callsign. Check it out sometime.

73/W8MSD
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:11:43 PM EDT
Since I'm on a role here, let me ask another stupid question ...

One of those pictures above had your GPS unit linked to your radio? What's the purpose of that? Are you using your radio's antenna to enhance your GPS antennae on your hand-held?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:18:24 PM EDT
Well it's not my post but I know a little about it... it is called APRS and it will up link your position threw a APRS repeater and transmit your location, you can keep up with all your buddys. I am not into it but I have friends that are, google APRS and it may tell you more.
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