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Posted: 3/19/2006 12:23:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 2:54:13 AM EDT by 9245]
The thread on color World War 2 pictures reminded me of these, color pictures of World War 2 actually arn't that uncommon, you just don't see them that often the History Channel even has a series called The Color Of War, it's just a standard World War 2 documentery series except it uses all color footage, what is uncommon is color pictures from World War 1 (though they did do one actuall documentery useing all color World War 1 footage,,,,), these are all REAL color photos from World War 1 there not colorized, they didn't have color film as we no it then, but they did have a proccess to take color pictures, the method was different but the result was the same color pictures....















































































































Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:24:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:24:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 12:28:01 PM EDT by Chokey]
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:26:43 PM EDT
they had red X's in WWI?
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:27:28 PM EDT
They were top secret back then.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:29:14 PM EDT
Hope you get it fixed.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:29:15 PM EDT
X
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:29:22 PM EDT
Links broke try linking directly hear are the pictures:

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714430863.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714424440.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714415219.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714422363.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714412559.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714405612.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714403471.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714400987.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714384966.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714381451.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714373617.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714364488.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714360473.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714352684.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714345564.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714342665.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714333035.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714322125.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714313115.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714303884.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714300680.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714294683.jpg&s=x11

puttfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714292685.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714284584.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714281239.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714274065.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714270646.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714264279.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714262144.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714255414.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714252962.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714245123.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714241256.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714234880.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714232194.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714225362.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714214887.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714211994.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714205577.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714200823.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714192570.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714184284.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714175629.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714173573.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714170638.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714163237.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714161233.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714153725.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714151198.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714073498.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714070621.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714064937.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714062617.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714061429.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714055622.jpg&s=x11

putfile.com/pic.php?pic=3/7714054015.jpg&s=x11
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:29:48 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:31:10 PM EDT
your links are not working either.

Try using Photobucket.com
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:32:42 PM EDT
THIS POST SUCKS!

So far.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:36:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 12:37:03 PM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 12:37:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 1:05:14 PM EDT by dalesimpson]


The location of the picture should look like this: http://x11.putfile.com/3/7714403471.jpg
That url with the *img* tags gives you this:


Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:03:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 1:04:27 PM EDT by 9245]
LINKS FIXED
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:06:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:09:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 1:10:26 PM EDT by dalesimpson]

Originally Posted By 9245:
LINKS FIXED



Nice pics. Thanks for fixing the urls.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:09:57 PM EDT
awesome pics, thanks.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:10:50 PM EDT
Definitely worth the effort!

Thanks for the pics!
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:16:03 PM EDT
FANTASTIC!
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:17:57 PM EDT
It's hard to imagine that that was less than a century ago.

It seems (to me anyway) that it's like ancient history.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:36:50 PM EDT
Here is the process they used to make color pictures:

LA VIE EN COULEUR


THE CENTENARY OF THE AUTOCHROME
2004 – 2007


Free Exhibition in open-air
June 25 - october 15 2004
Hôtel du Département
[29-31 cours de la Liberté Lyon 3ème]



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Autochrome was patented on 17 December 1903 but not unveiled to the Academy of Science until 30 May 1904, which is why its centennial is celebrated in 2004.
The start of the 20th century saw thousands of photographs being taken all over the world using this transparency process, which Louis Lumière considered to be his masterpiece.
This open-air exhibition features largesize reproductions of many Autochromes, all of which are from the original Lumière Collection, with the aim of making them accessible to the general public. The photographs include a variety of family scenes and also a number of shots given to Louis Lumière by Autochrome-using friends, such as pictures of the Great War taken by Jean-Baptiste Tournassoud.

The Lumière Institute is located on the site where the Cinematographe and the Autochromes were invented. Its mission, as entrusted by Louis Lumière’s heirs, is to promote this heritage and bring it to the attention of the whole world.
The Lumière Institute joined forces with the Rhône Regional Authorities to design this exhibition as a way of paying tribute to the first-ever colour photographs in the department where they were invented.

THE HISTORY OF THE AUTOCHROME
Louis Lumière had already invented instant photographic plates and the Cinematographe when, in late 1903, he and his brother Auguste patented a new process for producing colour photographs : the Autochrome.
Before the invention of the Autochrome, colours were separated using a complex three-colour process whereby three successive exposures had to be taken and then superimposed onto each other. Louis Lumière, however, devised a method of filtering light by using a single three-colour screen made up of millions of grains of potato starch dyed in three different colours. This mixture was then laid out on a varnished glass plate, which would be ready for use once it was coated in a black and white emulsion. Developing the plate entailed applying the same process as was used for black and white photographs at the time, with the impression being processed to reversal.
As with pointillist painting, the colour effect is rendered by viewing the image in its entirety, since the colours are created from the juxtaposition of the multitude of dots; indeed, the essential charm of these photographs derives from that very juxtaposition.
Finally, in 1907, after years of work, the Autochrome was launched onto the market and met with immediate and longlasting success – it was to be another thirty years before anything else came along to compete with it, and that was when chemical colour processes were devised to do on film what this delicate transparency process did on glass.

As the grand-children of Louis Lumière, we are delighted to see this exhibition presented at the Departmental Hall, which is a most fitting way of launching the celebration of the centennial of the Lumière Autochrome.
Our grand-father often used to tell us that he considered the Autochrome to be the invention of his life, saying: "It took me seven years of tireless effort. I did nothing else during that time. I never once got disillusioned."
While it only took him a few months to develop his Cinematographe and project moving images on to a screen, producing colour photographs proved to be a much more tricky proposition. He devoted enormous time and energy to his creation, and the fruit of his labours did justice to his commitment: even today, there can be no denying the indescribable beauty and technical splendour of the photographs made possible by the Autochrome. It was invented in 1904, and when it hit the markets in 1907 it brought colour photography within the reach of everyone.
From a personal point of view, we are deeply touched to see so many family scenes and portraits among the images on display, including pictures of our mothers and those that were dear to them. We hope that the people who come to admire this exhibition will savour the beauty of a superb technique and appreciate a looking through a window on times gone-by.
Louis Lumière’s grand-children

http://www.institut-lumiere.org/english/lumiere/autochexpo.html
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:37:29 PM EDT
Amazing pictures!

The clarity is much better than I would have expected.

Thanks!

B_S
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 1:58:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 2:00:01 PM EDT by Phil_in_Seattle]

Originally Posted By 9245:
The thread on color World War 2 pictures reminded me of these, color pictures of World War 2 actually arn't that uncommon, you just don't see them that often the History Channel even has a series called The Color Of War, it's just a standard World War 2 documentery series except it uses all color footage, what is uncommon is color pictures from World War 1 (though they did do one actuall documentery useing all color World War 1 footage,,,,), these are all REAL color photos from World War 1 there not colorized, they didn't have color film as we no it then, but they did have a proccess to take color pictures, the method was different but the result was the same color pictures....



Autochrome would be the process, the lines in the sky areas of the images are a typical characteristic. Autochrome wasn't film, but rather an emulsion glass plates, it had an effective ASA rating of 4 and it yielded a positive transparancy rather than a negative image



ETA I see that 9245 beat me to naming the Autochrome process, I really should refresh the threads before posting.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:36:18 PM EDT
what's amazing here is the of all those photos, only 6-7 show guys holding guns...

this is the french army, right?

i'm right, aren't i...

check it out....
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:48:52 PM EDT
if you look at news shots of iraq, all the american guys have guns. 2 or 3 of 'em.

most room-clearing kids have at least 1 pistol, 1 rifle...

these guys are sending people to war w/o a rifle, or they're not carrying 'em when they're in the field.

i'd wear the parkerizing off mine, dragging it around everywhere, i'll tell you what....

so what if it's heavy, you start taking fire you can return it...



Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:52:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tommygs:
if you look at news shots of iraq, all the american guys have guns. 2 or 3 of 'em.

most room-clearing kids have at least 1 pistol, 1 rifle...

these guys are sending people to war w/o a rifle, or they're not carrying 'em when they're in the field.

i'd wear the parkerizing off mine, dragging it around everywhere, i'll tell you what....

so what if it's heavy, you start taking fire you can return it...






I'd imagine in WW1 the front would be so well defined and unchanging there would be almost no need to be armed while in the rear.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:54:59 PM EDT
people sure were pudgy and fat back then
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:55:11 PM EDT
Excellent pictures
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:56:50 PM EDT
Awesome!
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 2:57:11 PM EDT
Cool pics.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 3:06:10 PM EDT
Very Cool.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 3:18:31 PM EDT
In fact, handguns were very, very common among front line troops, especially the E.M.'s. The French issued well over 1 million handguns of various types. The shovel, the mace, and the hand axs were very common trench warfare tools for close in work.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 3:20:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
people sure were pudgy and fat back then


Modern cameras only add 10 pounds, the older models added more.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 3:42:48 PM EDT
I have seen these but I love seeing them again.

I may even go take some to be reproduced and them frame a few.

I think we fail to teach or appreciate WWI in this country. From what I understand it is a much bigger deal in Europe than here (understandable, to a degree).

To me, WWI as much as the American and French Revolutions marked the end of one era, and the begining of another.

The Old Ways of gentleman aristocrats, sabres, and calvary found out they were no match for a machinegun nest. Slaughter to a degree never before envisioned. An entire generation of European men killed each other off, for what?


Link Posted: 3/19/2006 3:48:32 PM EDT
awesome pics.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 4:37:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tommygs:
what's amazing here is the of all those photos, only 6-7 show guys holding guns...

this is the french army, right?

i'm right, aren't i...

check it out....



Your right all the photos are French, they were the only ones useing that method of photography then....
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:19:50 PM EDT
Wow, amazing pics, brings one right back to the times..
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:34:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
I have seen these but I love seeing them again.

I may even go take some to be reproduced and them frame a few.

I think we fail to teach or appreciate WWI in this country. From what I understand it is a much bigger deal in Europe than here (understandable, to a degree).

To me, WWI as much as the American and French Revolutions marked the end of one era, and the begining of another.

The Old Ways of gentleman aristocrats, sabres, and calvary found out they were no match for a machinegun nest. Slaughter to a degree never before envisioned. An entire generation of European men killed each other off, for what?





Big +1. At the battle of the Somme River, the British alone took 60,000 dead in 6 hours. WWI destroyed our innocence as a culture and we've never been the same since. Very sad.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:45:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2006 5:46:13 PM EDT by Triumph955i]
those pictures make me want to buy a old large format camera.

5x7 or larger.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:52:03 PM EDT
Very cool pictures. I have a crystal clear picture of my Grandfather, and friends during WWII, he was an airplane Mechanic in France, for most of he war. He was probably in his early 20s. I always had a mental image of WWII soldiers as old, like John Wayne, or those other old actors, in there 30s or later, I just didn't think of them as being young. It struck me one day, when I was in my early 20s, those guys look just like my friends, same short hair cuts, wearing od pants, and T shirts. It really made the war not seem like such distant history, it looked like a black and white picture of some of my own friends, leaning on a jeep. Really cool.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:55:59 PM EDT
tag
some of those look like models (the miniture kind not the hot chick kind), must have to do with the quality of film back then
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 6:00:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crazyquik:
The Old Ways of gentleman aristocrats, sabres, and calvary found out they were no match for a machinegun nest. Slaughter to a degree never before envisioned. An entire generation of European men killed each other off, for what?



Err... Long story...
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 6:24:56 PM EDT
Those look like air bob soles on the soldiers boot in the last pic. Would never have thought they would have had those back then. I thought that was a recent innovation.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 6:39:05 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 1:12:25 AM EDT
Last remaining red X, spelled "puttfile" in the OP.

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 1:20:18 AM EDT


This is a spectacular picture.. it looks like a diorama.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:27:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SWS:
It's hard to imagine that that was less than a century ago.

It seems (to me anyway) that it's like ancient history.



+1

These are a rare treat. Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:38:43 AM EDT
Would that my Grandfather were still alive, the stories he told me about his service in France still scare the hell out of me.
Gas attacks
Over the top
No mans land
Hand to hand
The diseases
And the one thing common to all war, the smell.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 5:42:21 AM EDT
Thanks 9245! Those are great pictures. I was wondering what speed they were shot at, very sharp considering it is ASA 4.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 5:56:20 AM EDT
OUTSTANDING POST!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 6:22:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mosin_sniper:
Big +1. At the battle of the Somme River, the British alone took 60,000 dead in 6 hours. WWI destroyed our innocence as a culture and we've never been the same since. Very sad.



Actually there were 60,00 total casualties but "only" 20,000 KIA that day. The battle of the Somme went on into September when the rains hit. Some sporadic fighting carried on until winter. French and British casualties combined were over 600,000. The German casualties were any where from 450,000 to 600,000 depending on the source.
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