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Posted: 3/18/2006 7:11:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 7:12:09 PM EDT by hughjafj]
Hi all, I adopted a deaf, purebred, Old English Sheepdog puppy today. He's 10 weeks old, beautiful, and very friendly.

Any tips on house breaking him and training him? Anyone else raise a deaf dog?

I'll post pics of him in a bit.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:15:05 PM EDT
You just have to get his attention first...

Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:19:36 PM EDT
Best way to house train any dog is to crate train them.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:26:07 PM EDT
Train the dog like any other dog that does have hearing, most if not all dogs do not understand spoken language. The dogs knows association of words and actions. You could use pokes or pinches to its flank when it does wrong, and use hand signals for sit, down or anything else. Your demeanor or expressions can tell a dog alot. What ever you do you must stick with the routine.

You may also want to get a pinch collar to help you get the dogs attention when it is not in arms reach. This could take the place of a "Come", or a whistle. You may want to talk to a professional if getting involved with a pinch collar, you can cause more harm then good if it is not used correctly.

Good luck with the puppy.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:27:10 PM EDT
Could you expand on that a bit Patty? I was really hoping you would stop in this thread as I know it's what you do. Any input from an expert would be highly appreciated.

I have raised a hearing dog but this seems so different, you know?
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:27:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 7:28:25 PM EDT by blacklisted]
Perhaps a mild shock collar that you can press a button to "call" the dog". Two shocks is sit, three is lay down, etc. And by mild I mean VERY mild.

Actually, touch might be enough. I've never thought about training a deaf dog.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:29:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 7:29:47 PM EDT by NimmerMehr]

Originally Posted By blacklisted:
Perhaps a mild shock collar that you can press a button to "call" the dog". Two shocks is sit, three is lay down, etc. And by mild I mean VERY mild.

Actually, touch might be enough. I've never thought about training a deaf dog.



No! Tape a pager to his collar, set to vibrate, then when you want himto come you just phone him home!

Edit: On speed dial!
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:30:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 7:30:56 PM EDT by blacklisted]

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By blacklisted:
Perhaps a mild shock collar that you can press a button to "call" the dog". Two shocks is sit, three is lay down, etc. And by mild I mean VERY mild.

Actually, touch might be enough. I've never thought about training a deaf dog.



No! Tape a pager to his collar, set to vibrate, then when you want himto come you just phone him home!

Edit: On speed dial!



You may be on to something. A device that vibrates in different patterns on command could be useful for training a deaf dog. Not a dildo though (just have to cover this before some sick bastard brings it up).
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:32:00 PM EDT
Thank you Gotguns! I'm probably in over my head, eh?

He's beautiful though and it only cost us fifty bucks for a dog from a breeder that usually sells these for over a few thousand dollars. It was love at first sight and I just had to do it.

So, just treat as normal then but with emphasis on body language? I don't want him to do tricks or anything just obey simple commands.

I think he may be only partially deaf since he seems to wake up when I yell. He doesn't respond to anything less than a yell or loud whistle and even then I'm not sure if he's just feeling vibrations. He was tested by a vet and they said he was completely deaf, but I wonder.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:32:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By blacklisted:
Perhaps a mild shock collar that you can press a button to "call" the dog". Two shocks is sit, three is lay down, etc. And by mild I mean VERY mild.

Actually, touch might be enough. I've never thought about training a deaf dog.



No! Tape a pager to his collar, set to vibrate, then when you want himto come you just phone him home!

Edit: On speed dial!




We actually put a vibrating pager on my lab once just to see what he would do.

He freaked out and thought some sort of bug was getting him. You could tell exactly when the pager stopped vibrating because he'd stop spazzing out and start looking around on the ground like whatever it was that was buzzing him must have fallen off.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:36:37 PM EDT
I never dealt with a deaf dog, but I owned a blind greyhound. His kennel name was One-Eyed-Joe, because one of his eyes was all white. The truth was that he was blind in both eyes.

Joe was amazing. Once he knew the lay of the land, he would run without fear, and he could navigate through the house with no problem. He could even find his food or water if it was moved to a new location.

Joe died at the young age of 7. He had a vascular incident in his sleep. You couldn;t ask for a better companion.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:39:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Best way to house train any dog is to crate train them.



crate training is fine if you want your dog to shit and piss in the house. My dogs are taught that the crate is a safe place. They eat and sleep in the crate, get their bones in a crate.

How do you get the dog to learn to go outside?

I live in an apartment with 3 dogs. My Rotty puppy was trained in 2 weeks at the most. Since he was 11 weeks old he has not had any accidents in the house. My dogs spends 8-12 hours in a crate while I'm at work and the last thing I want to do is to clean a cage and him every day after work.

If you supervise the dog as much as you can for the first few weeks it will make it easier as time goes on.

Link Posted: 3/18/2006 7:43:58 PM EDT

How do you get the dog to learn to go outside?

That's my question. It's especially hard because you can't scream at him to let him know he was bad.

With my hearing dog I would just do the nose rub spanking and nose rub outside. Is that what you did, Gotguns? If not, what?
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:00:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 8:02:25 PM EDT by Got_Guns]
hughjafj,

The how do you get the dog to go outside comment was directed at the crate training suggestion.

For me, I didn't use the rub the nose in it trick or the spanking trick. As I stated earlier when the puppy is loose in the house it must be supervised and boundaries must be set up. Just like a human baby, you wouldn't allow your child to roam free at a few months or years old. I made sure that the dog was only allowed in the kitchen (linoleum floor as apposed to carpet - much easier to clean up) and when the dog was in process, I would grab him and bring him outside. When he did his business outside I would praise him vocally, and with a pat to his side, I would also have a treat ready. If you find a mess somewhere in the house but did not catch him in the act, then there isn't much you could do, the damage is done. Your actions are most effective when you catch him in the act.

The most important thing that I did was to take him outside first thing in the morning (a routine that unfortunately he has gotten used to and even on the weekends I am outside at 6am). I also would take him outside before and after every feeding.

As I stated it may be a pain in the ass to watch the puppy all the time and to follow the same routine every day but it is a must if you want to get the dog housebroken quickly. The more you slack the more mess you will have to clean and the longer the house training will take. And don't get mad at the dog. As a puppy, he can't "hold it" for long periods of time.

Also, if you already have trained other dogs before than it may be easier to stick with the voice commands (it is what you are used to) but also incorporate touches or pokes and treats into the mix, as that kind of interaction will have a greater affect on your puppy.

Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:03:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Got_Guns:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Best way to house train any dog is to crate train them.



crate training is fine if you want your dog to shit and piss in the house. My dogs are taught that the crate is a safe place. They eat and sleep in the crate, get their bones in a crate.

How do you get the dog to learn to go outside?

I live in an apartment with 3 dogs. My Rotty puppy was trained in 2 weeks at the most. Since he was 11 weeks old he has not had any accidents in the house. My dogs spends 8-12 hours in a crate while I'm at work and the last thing I want to do is to clean a cage and him every day after work.

If you supervise the dog as much as you can for the first few weeks it will make it easier as time goes on.




First they have to learn to hold it before they learn where to leave it. Puppies who are not crate train do not pay attention to the act of relieving themselves for quite a while. Crating them makes them think about going. Once you take them out of the crate immediately put them where you want them to go and praise them. They make the connection a lot easier by crating then without. I house break several puppies a year [about 10] I know. Trust me, I know.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:05:40 PM EDT
Excellent, Gotguns. Thank you very much!
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:07:19 PM EDT
Thank you as well, Patty! Much food for thought. I appreciate the constructive input!
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:08:23 PM EDT
Why is the dog deaf?
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:19:01 PM EDT
+1,000 for crate training. Do a search to get full instructions. Whenever the pup is out of his crate you should be watching him. After you get tuned into the dog you will be able to tell when he's getting ready to go. A different walk, kinda waddling, rapid change in direction back and forth, excessive sniffing. When you see this snatch them up and run them outdoors. Lots of praise when you get there (with a deaf dog gentle petting and a happy expression will do). Train your dog with hand signals just like you would with words. Outdoors try waving your hands to get the dogs attention in the daytime(they have great peripheral vision). At night flick the porch lights to get them to come or light them up with a flashlight to get their attention. In the house get the dogs attention by stamping your foot. They can feel the vibration from a pretty good distance even upstairs in an older home.
There's alot more if you care to email me I can share some of what I've learned.-Mark
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 8:33:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hughjafj:
Thank you Gotguns! I'm probably in over my head, eh?

He's beautiful though and it only cost us fifty bucks for a dog from a breeder that usually sells these for over a few thousand dollars. It was love at first sight and I just had to do it.

So, just treat as normal then but with emphasis on body language? I don't want him to do tricks or anything just obey simple commands.

I think he may be only partially deaf since he seems to wake up when I yell. He doesn't respond to anything less than a yell or loud whistle and even then I'm not sure if he's just feeling vibrations. He was tested by a vet and they said he was completely deaf, but I wonder.



They can still feel vibrations.. if you have wood floors with a basement (your up north, so i'll assume yes) try stomping your foot. Or just maybe clapping. Or a bullhorn and riot gear (when he is bad)
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 9:01:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2006 9:04:19 PM EDT by hughjafj]
Patty, I guess it's genetic in some breeds, Old English Sheepdogs being one of those breeds. It was born that way.

Here's a pic:



Thanks for the additional encouragement and input Nimmer and Joker. I will most likely take you up on the offer of advice by email Mark. Thanks a bunch!
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 10:02:11 PM EDT
Any time.
What a sweety!
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 10:04:15 PM EDT
AnotherDude!!! LMFFAO!!!!!!
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