Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 3/17/2006 8:17:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/17/2006 8:38:35 PM EDT by COLE-CARBINE]
SPECIAL OPERATIONS VEHICLE REVIEW....

While perhaps quiet insertions of small teams for recon and precision strike missions are the hallmark of SOF, the necessity for tactical mobility within an area of operations has become essential, especially in light of the expanding role of special forces in the global war on terror. SOTECH looks at a variety of vehicle options for the SOF warrior.


GMV
Within the U.S. SOF world, three vehicles lead the way: the Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV), the ground resupply vehicle and the interim fast attack vehicle.

The extremely adaptable, tried-and-true HMMWV, manufactured by AM General, South Bend, Ind., forms the backbone of Special Forces ground mobility. Craig MacNabb, AM General’s director of public relations, told SOTECH that the Special Forces GMV is the basic HMMWV modified to fit the mission profile of Special Forces teams.

“It has an upper body configured to suit the Special Forces warriors,” MacNabb said. “So there’s a lot of talk today, for example, about armor on Humvees for improvised explosive devices and adding more armor. But the Ground Mobility Vehicle that the Special Forces people use is not an armored vehicle as a general rule.”

That’s because Special Forces place a high value on mobility, flexibility and carrying as many weapons as possible. Too much armor would weigh the vehicle down and diminish its capacity to carry personnel, weapons and supplies.

“In fact, most of the vehicles don’t have any glass in the windshield because they want to be able to fire weapons out through the front where the windshield would be,” MacNabb noted. “The vehicles tend to bristle with weapons mounts.”

An HMMWV typically might have a weapons mount on its turret for a .50 or a 7.62 mm machine gun, but the GMV has the ability to carry four or five weapons—including .50 caliber machine guns, anti-materiel rifles, automatic grenade launchers and 7.62 machine guns—around its perimeter on mounts that swing out from its door posts.

The Ground Mobility Vehicle also usually has a satellite radio antenna mounted on it, MacNabb added. It carries camouflage nets and water and fuel cans not normally found on an HMMWV. A variety of other racks are fitted to hold weapons such as the AT-4 or Javelin as well as ammunition, food and supplies to operate independently for several days at a time if necessary.

While the GMV is a darling of Special Forces, special operators weren’t certain they would like the vehicle when they first entered Afghanistan and Iraq for operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. “There was a time a few years’ back that Special Forces weren’t sure that they were too fond of Humvees,” MacNabb said. “They thought they were too big and noisy and distinct. They wanted something smaller and less obtrusive. But discovered in Afghanistan and especially in the campaigns they fought in northern Iraq during the combat phase of the war just what they could accomplish with a Humvee.”

Following the lead of Army Special Forces, the Rangers, SEALS and Air Force Special Operations Command have acquired their own GMVs, each slightly modified to meet their own specific operational needs.

War Pig

Since the Long Range Desert Group of World War II fame, special operations patrols have needed a mother ship of sorts to keep the smaller tactical vehicles supplied with fuel, rations and ammunition. That need still exists today.

Before going into Afghanistan and Iraq, U.S. Army Special Forces 5th Group at Fort Bragg modified several Stewart & Stevenson LMTVs to act as mother ships. In some circles called the ground resupply vehicle but commonly known as the War Pig, the trucks had the cabs cut down and the rear deck altered to handle an average load of 36-40 fuel cans, 20-24 water cans, four GMV tires, plus various racks for ammunition. When deployed, typically a sheet of plywood would be put on top of the fuel/water cans and have personal gear, MREs and other supply items secured on top. A crane was mounted on the left side of the rear deck for, among other things, lifting 55-gallon drums of fuel aboard. A standard cargo trailer was also modified with an 18-inch tongue for better swing capability to increase the overall carrying capacity. Lethality was not sacrificed—after all it is a Special Forces truck—with several swing arm mounts up front and a pintle mount on the rear deck for a .50 caliber or MK 19.

As the GMV has evolved, so too has the War Pig. While the original War Pig was converted by backyard mechanics and wood, PVC and fittings from Home Depot, Letterkenney Army Depot has just sent out the first prototype of the new and improved War Pig for test and evaluation. Some of the enhancements include, a space frame cab with half door armor and a roof turret; improved ammunition and modular racks for fuel, water, rations, and personal gear; space for four GMV spare tires; a multi-position electric crane for handling tires and 55-gallon drums; DC to AC power conversion; slide-out trays and racks in frame assembly; a ballistic windshield; armor protection for key components such as the battery, fuel tanks and engine; compressed air tanks relocated and equipped with retractable hose for use on tools and tires; an improved communications and intercom system; and a diesel auxiliary power unit.

IFAV

The U.S. Marine Corps uses a G-Class vehicle, manufactured by Advanced Vehicle Systems (AVS) of Jacksonville, N.C., as its Interim Fast Attack Vehicle (IFAV). But the “G” in G-Class represents the Geländewagen, a 4x4 manufactured by automobile giant DaimlerChrysler.

Kevin Shusko, AVS vice president of training and logistics, told Special Operations Technology that the IFAV project began in 1999. The Marine Corps needed a replacement for its M151 Fast Attack Vehicle, so Marine Corps System Command contracted for a commercial off-the-shelf replacement for the vehicle until a new one could be developed. “So our company looked at all of the various off-road vehicles that met the operational requirements, and we felt that the Geländewagen had the best chance of fulfilling all of the requirements,” Shusko said. “We worked with Mercedes Benz, and we made a lot of different modifications to the vehicle to support the Marine Corps mission.”

The AVS integrated Mercedes-Benz G-Class base vehicle exhibits power, agility, durability and safety—a rare but valuable combination, according to AVS. The G-Class can travel at 96 mph, and it can tackle terrain with a grade of 80 percent or less. Currently, more than 50,000 of them are in service under NATO, according to AVS.

“It has a lot of advantages, such as the sustainability of the vehicle,” Shusko said. “The vehicle gets 18 to 22 miles per the gallon, in comparison to a lot of other tactical vehicles that only get 12. So your fuel legs on the vehicle are about 500 miles.”

In addition, the vehicle has a turbo-charged five-cylinder engine that generates 156 horsepower, making its performance comparable to many eight-cylinder engines, Shusko said. The vehicle has the additional advantage of being a true four-wheel drive vehicle. “With a lot of your off-road vehicles, you might call it a four-wheel drive, but you can’t lock in every wheel, you can only lock in the differentials. This vehicle here you can lock in hydraulically each wheel, so you have four wheels either pulling or pushing,” Shusko said.

The G-Class base was originally developed in 1979, Shusko said. The vehicle is much narrower than a Humvee, which allows it to fit in helicopters and be deployed into areas that are difficult to reach, such as mountainous terrain.

rest of article found here
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:08:58 PM EDT
SOTECH visits USASOC’s 3rd Group and looks at their GMVs and GRVs.

link

From the war in Afghanistan came an urgent combat mission needs statement (CMNS) for tactical transport. One of the platforms needed was a small truck capable of off-roading and carrying a reasonable load. The quick choice was a combination of Toyota pickup trucks acquired from surprised and very happy Toyota dealers in Kentucky and Tennessee.

The first vehicles were converted by L3 Communications Integrated Systems, Lexington, KY, and delivered to the theater in about five weeks from the CMNS date. The modifications were relatively minor, featuring mainly a rear bed rollbar with an integrated shelf for ammunition stowage and a socket for a weapon mount. Although perhaps not a perfect solution, they filled the need immediately and were appreciated. After months of abusive work in the moonscape of Afghanistan, many of the Toyotas were considered expended, and it is believed that 5th Group, for example, did not bring any of the vehicles home.

Ground Mobility Vehicle

With the short-term need filled, efforts were focused on a long term solution, and the HMMWV was the clear choice. Standardization of parts and logistics support, and the fact that the HMMWV has the capacity and size to haul the supplies and personnel for the operational detachment alphas (ODA) when deployed, carried the decision. While the basic HMMWV was the perfect base for the Ground Mobility Vehicle (GMV), it needed a lot of work to have the lethality, survivability and sustainability that the ODAs needed.

The GMV is a HMMWV on steroids. Over the course of its development, and it is still considered a work in progress, special forces teams have added weapons, communications systems, survivability features, mobility aids, straps, boxes and just about anything that can be imagined.

According to Mike Cooney, manager of Mobility Products Sales Development with Military Systems Group (MSG), there are three main variants of the GMV. “Each organization has slightly different mission requirements,” said Cooney. “Although the modification may be different, Cooney said, “from a supportability perspective, “any GMV could roll into a motor pool and be serviced easily.”

MSG became involved in the GMV program back in 1997 when, after seeing the company’s swing arm machine gun mounts on some UAE vehicles, members of 5th Special Forces Group requested similar fittings. After tracking the company down, that first contact formed a long-time relationship that has developed a list of more than 120 line item enhancements that can be added to the GMV in groups or by picking and choosing the add-ons that best fit particular mission needs.

The GMVs first used the M1025A2, while later GMVs are now based on the M1113 turbo-charged HMMWV.

SOTECH recently spent several days at Ft. Bragg and had the chance to visit with 3rd Group and look over their vehicles. While they were unanimous in their appreciation of the modified Toyotas and the array of ATVs that were dropped into the theater, the GMV was, without a doubt, considered a great vehicle and allowed them the success in the field, both in Afghanistan and Iraq.

There are usually four GMVs per team, with three members on each. In the field, teams usually tried to carry enough supplies for independent operations for 10 days. This meant plenty of tires, fuels, ammunition and food. When tires proved especially vulnerable in the jagged terrain of Afghanistan, Super Swamper tires were delivered with heavier knobs and a 10-ply sidewall.

The MGS swing arm mounts allowed a fixed number of gun positions to offer firepower with maximum effect in every direction. The key is putting as much firepower on a target as quickly as possible. The mounts can carry virtually anything from machine guns from 7.62 mm up through the .50-caliber, the Mk 19 automatic grenade launcher and the Barrett sniper rifle. The team usually carried two Javelin launchers with each vehicle carrying extra rockets. The teams found the system valuable and added straps in other locations around their GMVs for additional rounds.

The remoteness and mission requirements of SOF operators in Afghanistan magnified the need for a broad range of communication tools in the hands of the ODAs. Starting with a system that worked well previously, they made sure it was a Gentex intercom system in the GMV. This is an open system that allowed the vehicle team members to know what each was doing and seeing. Each GMV usually had two SINCGARS radios, and two of the four team vehicles have SATCOM systems with bat-wing antennas that allowed a link-on-the-move capability. Amplifiers were added to the SATCOMs to boost their capability, especially when in a deep valley. The AN/PRC-117F by Harris and the MBITR by Thales were also critical according to team members. A Blue Force Tracker system and a PSN-11 GPS system rounded out the communications package on most GMVs.

Rangers and SEALS

The 75th Ranger Regiment initially brought the Land Rover series 110 into service as the Ranger Special Operations Vehicle (RSOV) primarily because it fit inside a C-141 and still allowed parachute operations from both side doors of the aircraft. Doctrinal changes, combined with the fielding of the C-17, eliminated that requirement. The Rangers initially acquired 42 M1025A2 GMVs and will have 72 of the M1113 GMVs allowing one company per battalion to conduct quick strike missions.

The Navy Seals at Coronado have also recently requested 60 vehicles (50 of them in full GMV mod). Despite the fact that there were already more than 110 different options available for the GMV conversion, the SEALS requested a number of ‘new’ additions for their vehicles.

Mother Ship

Despite everything that the GMV can carry, it is still a relatively small tactical vehicle and needs support when on extended operations – hence the mothership. There is history to this method of support dating back to World War II with the British SAS and LRDG. The modern day special ops mother ship is the LMTV, first modified by 5th Group.

Captain Ken Ates took SOTECH on a tour of the 3rd Group Ground Resupply Vehicles GRVs and showed us the vehicle and the 3rd Group mods on their enhanced trucks.

Up front on the cab, the doors were both cut down. On the driver’s side, a small cut out was made and filled in with plexiglas. These changes were all made to increase visibility, especially for the driver when operating in the close-in urban areas that were prevalent in Iraq.

The top of the cab was removed, a modified driver’s side windscreen put together, and a roll bar was added. Two MSG swing-arm mounts were added that, when combined with the two-four-tube grenade launchers on the bumper, offered self-protection capabilities over the frontal arc. Various boxes, jerry can racks, and a PVC tube were added to the front end of the GRV for storage and self-protection.

A crew of three man the GRV: driver/mechanic, gunner/loader and vehicle commander.

Inside the cab, the innovativeness of Ates and his team are obvious. The firing mechanisms for the grenade launchers, power plugs for the IR light, various communication devices, GPS, and Blue Force Tracking had to be added where possible, mainly from commercially available devices. Antennas for radio communications, including SATCOM, were magnetically attached, wired and even taped to the roll bar where possible.

The back end of the GRV is what makes it important. An average rear deck load would be 36-40 fuel cans, 20-24 water cans, four GMV tires, plus various racks for ammunition. When deployed, typically a sheet of plywood would be put on top of the fuel/water cans and have personal gear, MREs and other supply items secured on top. A crane is also carried on the left side of the rear deck for, among other things, lifting 55-gallon drums of fuel aboard.

To round out the GSV capabilities is a standard cargo trailer, but with an 18-inch modification of the tongue that allows tight turning enough to clear the rear tire rack.

In a perfect world, the GRV would park and have two GMVS pull in, driver to driver on opposite sides of the GRV. In the center of the rear deck is .50-caliber machine gun, mounted on a post high enough to close-in protection on either side of the GMVs.

Program Success

The GMV and GRV are perfect examples of a working understanding between industry and the actual operators of a system. The overall command has been supportive of the concept of allowing the end user to interact with equipment developers and design systems that fill specific needs with purpose-built items. SOF tools are mission oriented and rarely come from a cookie-cutter pattern. The enhancements that Military Systems Group has developed have been done based on operator requirements. “What has made this program move so well and so fast is that Special Operations Command allows their NCOs to interact directly with the vendors that can provide the services. This direct interaction insures that the current requirements from the operator in the field are articulated correctly to the vendor,” said Cooney.

Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:37:22 PM EDT
hanging a bunch of guns on it is cool and all but its still going to be slow as hell. not to mention big and ungainly. as a gun-truck i imagine its pretty good but for getting somewhere fast through the alleys of a centuries old urban environment ill take a diesel toyota thanks. i got a close friend in an HSLD outfit in Canada and they got their hands on some humvees and rave over them. WTF over? they could have had diesel LR 110's
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:47:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
hanging a bunch of guns on it is cool and all but its still going to be slow as hell. not to mention big and ungainly. as a gun-truck i imagine its pretty good but for getting somewhere fast through the alleys of a centuries old urban environment ill take a diesel toyota thanks. i got a close friend in an HSLD outfit in Canada and they got their hands on some humvees and rave over them. WTF over? they could have had diesel LR 110's



The new HMMWVs have turbo diesels, and are NOT slow. I don't know what engine this one has (I didn't read the whole post), but I doubt they are underpowered. A standard HMMWV weighs 5,200 lbs, the MP variant weighed 18,000 w/ armor. The MP variant had a more powerful engine that got it around pretty good. I doubt this version is even as close to as heavy as 18,000 lbs.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:50:00 PM EDT
wOOt! Rat Patrol
1
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:54:47 PM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:57:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:08:08 PM EDT by COLE-CARBINE]

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
hanging a bunch of guns on it is cool and all but its still going to be slow as hell. not to mention big and ungainly. as a gun-truck i imagine its pretty good but for getting somewhere fast through the alleys of a centuries old urban environment ill take a diesel toyota thanks. i got a close friend in an HSLD outfit in Canada and they got their hands on some humvees and rave over them. WTF over? they could have had diesel LR 110's



Beginning of article mentions that they used toyotas that were outfitted to their specs but essentially they couldn't take the abuse long term.


Although perhaps not a perfect solution, they filled the need immediately and were appreciated. After months of abusive work in the moonscape of Afghanistan, many of the Toyotas were considered expended, and it is believed that 5th Group, for example, did not bring any of the vehicles home.


IIRC US Rangers were using land rovers but switched to humvee's due to reliability problems with the land rover RSOV.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:57:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:01:24 PM EDT by Young-Kiwi]
The Australian Solution...



note on the side the 81mm Mortar Base plate on the side.

Big bad men off to cause hurt....
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:00:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Young-Kiwi:
The Australian Solution...

www.molki.free.fr/6roues/militaire/Australia%20SAS%20Land%20Rover%20Perentie%206­x6%20LR%20patrol%20vehicle%20near%20Bagram,%2­0Afghanistan%202002-08-02%20-1.jpg

note on the side the 81mm Mortar Base plate on the side.



I like the M4 mounted on the windshield.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:04:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:08:04 PM EDT by Young-Kiwi]
such a big change in 60 years since wwII

Non Vi Sed Arte - Not by Strength, by Guile

Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:05:11 PM EDT
I guess if you need your rifle, you need it RIGHT NOW
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:07:37 PM EDT
The more things change, the more they stay the same...





Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:15:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rifleman2000:

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
hanging a bunch of guns on it is cool and all but its still going to be slow as hell. not to mention big and ungainly. as a gun-truck i imagine its pretty good but for getting somewhere fast through the alleys of a centuries old urban environment ill take a diesel toyota thanks. i got a close friend in an HSLD outfit in Canada and they got their hands on some humvees and rave over them. WTF over? they could have had diesel LR 110's



The new HMMWVs have turbo diesels, and are NOT slow. I don't know what engine this one has (I didn't read the whole post), but I doubt they are underpowered. A standard HMMWV weighs 5,200 lbs, the MP variant weighed 18,000 w/ armor. The MP variant had a more powerful engine that got it around pretty good. I doubt this version is even as close to as heavy as 18,000 lbs.



I think the engine is 6.5L turbo-charged. 190 ponies and 380 ft.lbs torque. I figure with the Blue Force Tracker set-up, these things can cover a lot of ground quickly. Add in targeting via GPS/ROVER and this "light"vehicle can call in more firepower (say B1, B52, or AH-64/ A-10) than all the machine gun mounts could ever muster (no offense to the old timers pictured). Throw in Javelin AT and it really is a lot of boom-juice for a small vehicle.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:43:40 PM EDT
In the Document it mentions the New Zealand solution...
Pinzgauer


A vehicle made for easy transport within a CH-47 or MH-53 is the Pinzgauer from U.K. company Automotive Technik Ltd. The Pizgauer is highly configurable as well, with variants including the weapons platform, command-and-control and an ambulance variant.

“The Pinzgauer first entered service in the early 1970s with the Swiss Army followed by the Austrians and Yugoslavia. Sales quickly spread to over 26 different customers worldwide, including Oman, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela,” Bill Waddell, sales and marketing manager at Automotive Technik, told SOTECH.

The British Army also uses the Pinzgauer, which has been a favorite of the U.K. Rapid Response Forces, particularly the Royal Marines and airborne brigades. The Royal Navy and Air Force also use the vehicle. British armed forces have deployed more than 1,200 Pinzgauers in Afghanistan, Iraq and Sierra Leone, according to Waddell.

“The Pinzgauer has been introduced to the United States under Advanced Vehicle Systems Incorporated representation,” Waddell noted. “The Pinzgauer, while demonstrating superior off-road performances, has also been recognized for its unique dimensions, higher payloads than the Humvee but with a smaller footprint, critically important when assessing deployability onboard ships and for tactical internal helicopter transportation.”

U.S. Special Forces are evaluating the Pinzgauer as a command-and-control vehicle. In addition to fitting onboard the MH-53E, the V-22 could airlift the vehicle, Waddell pointed out, even though the vehicle carries in the neighborhood of 4,000 pounds of payload, adding to its versatility, Waddell said.

The typical Pinzgauer can carry up to 14 fully armed men, two standard NATO pallets or a mix of other equipment and personnel. The U.S. military is also examining the Pinzgauer’s usefulness as a mothership, supporting long-range reconnaissance by other vehicles, and as a heavy weapons platform. Both the Pinzgauer 4x4 and 6x6 have a common chassis with design configurations in the variants coming in the form of body modifications.

For much of its life, the Pinzgauer was made by Austrian company Steyr-Daimler-Puch. Canadian company Magna acquired Steyr in the late 1990s and transferred production to Automotive Technik, which was purchased by Stewart & Stevenson in April 2005.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:50:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:52:04 PM EDT by Young-Kiwi]

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:

Originally Posted By rifleman2000:

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
hanging a bunch of guns on it is cool and all but its still going to be slow as hell. not to mention big and ungainly. as a gun-truck i imagine its pretty good but for getting somewhere fast through the alleys of a centuries old urban environment ill take a diesel toyota thanks. i got a close friend in an HSLD outfit in Canada and they got their hands on some humvees and rave over them. WTF over? they could have had diesel LR 110's



The new HMMWVs have turbo diesels, and are NOT slow. I don't know what engine this one has (I didn't read the whole post), but I doubt they are underpowered. A standard HMMWV weighs 5,200 lbs, the MP variant weighed 18,000 w/ armor. The MP variant had a more powerful engine that got it around pretty good. I doubt this version is even as close to as heavy as 18,000 lbs.



I think the engine is 6.5L turbo-charged. 190 ponies and 380 ft.lbs torque. I figure with the Blue Force Tracker set-up, these things can cover a lot of ground quickly. Add in targeting via GPS/ROVER and this "light"vehicle can call in more firepower (say B1, B52, or AH-64/ A-10) than all the machine gun mounts could ever muster (no offense to the old timers pictured). Throw in Javelin AT and it really is a lot of boom-juice for a small vehicle.



That often is the role, to bring in the heavy stuff.
What you see one these vehicles is just useful stuff, you might need if you bump into someone. When that happens you need firepower NOW.

It is reasonably safe to assume that teams such as this will be operating without immediate aircover. So at least for a time they will access only to the resources they carry.
(Remember only 3 guys per vehicle, maybe 4 vehicles in a patrol, if they bump into anything, they are in trouble, and need will need to shoot their way out)
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:51:33 PM EDT
Those things are cool!
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:53:30 PM EDT

A vehicle made for easy transport within a CH-47 or MH-53 is the Pinzgauer from U.K. company Automotive Technik Ltd. The Pizgauer is highly configurable as well, with variants including the weapons platform, command-and-control and an ambulance variant.


Pretty impressive. Would like to see what it looks like with a cab and windshield though. I have a Polaris Ranger 6x6 and it is a go buggy off-road, I can only imagine what the Pizgauer can do.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:59:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Young-Kiwi:

That often is the role, to bring in the heavy stuff.
What you see one these vehicles is just useful stuff, you might need if you bump into someone. When that happens you need firepower NOW.

It is reasonably safe to assume that teams such as this will be operating without immediate aircover. So at least for a time they will access only to the resources they carry.
(Remember only 3 guys per vehicle, maybe 4 vehicles in a patrol, if they bump into anything, they are in trouble, and need will need to shoot their way out)



I concur. I do believe that spec-ops used this set up to great effect in Iraq and Afganistan with lots of air-power available. No doubt that the MG's are just to get the hell out of Dodge but the ability to call down the thunder from a B1 or say an AC-130 is, to quote Beck..."Where it's at."

However the MK-47 40mm greande launcher mounted on the GMV would be sweet.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:12:23 PM EDT

ThankS......

Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:16:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 888:
ThankS......




???
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:17:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By COLE-CARBINE:

Originally Posted By 888:
ThankS......




???



Link Posted: 3/21/2006 7:55:21 PM EDT
Definant TAG
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:08:09 AM EDT
"The Navy Seals at Coronado have also recently requested 60 vehicles (50 of them in full GMV mod). Despite the fact that there were already more than 110 different options available for the GMV conversion, the SEALS requested a number of ‘new’ additions for their vehicles."

Hair dryer, perfume dispenser, vanity mirrors?

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:13:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FourStringSlinger:
"The Navy Seals at Coronado have also recently requested 60 vehicles (50 of them in full GMV mod). Despite the fact that there were already more than 110 different options available for the GMV conversion, the SEALS requested a number of ‘new’ additions for their vehicles."

Hair dryer, perfume dispenser, vanity mirrors?




Seat Warmers
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:13:55 AM EDT
I'll take two

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:32:17 AM EDT
Here's the new Isreali take on this.


New special forces vehicle kicks ass — the llama

Article

TEL AVIV — Israel's military has found the perfect vehicle for special operations forces — the llama.

After extensive tests, the uncomplaining work-horse animals were found to easily out-perform donkeys. What's more, they need refuelling only every other day.

Military sources said the Israel Army plans to use llamas for reconnaissance and combat missions in enemy territory, Middle East Newsline reported. They described the llama as ideal for special operations missions in Lebanon against the Iranian-sponsored Hizbullah.

"The llama is a quiet and disciplined animal that can carry huge loads," a military source said. "Vehicles make noise and need roads and fuel. We've tried donkeys and they are not suitable for such missions."
The sources said the army has been training special forces to conduct low-signature ground missions in enemy territory. In January, llamas were employed in a special forces exercise in the Golan Heights.

The exercise employed a scenario in which a special operations unit entered Lebanon or Syria for reconnaissance and sabotage. During the exercise, the llamas carried more than 50 kilograms of equipment over mountainous terrain.

The army plans to train a force of llamas to carry up to 100 kilograms of equipment and supplies, the sources said. They said this would ease the burden on troops and enable special operations forces to focus on combat or reconnaissance.

The sources said donkeys also participated in the Golan Heights exercise. They said the donkeys did not perform as well and required much more food than llamas. The llamas could be fed once every other day.


Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:18:58 PM EDT
bump
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:30:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:35:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dpmmn:
I'll take two

www.panzerbaer.de/helper/pix/us_hmmwv_M1097_specops-001.jpg



We would be happy to build you two.

Cash or Charge?
When do you want them?
What color would you like?
OD, Camo or Tan?
Top Top