Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 3/14/2006 5:52:45 PM EDT


The local Albertson's had these on sale for $1 a bag.

10¢ worth was more than I could take.

I heated up one pouch of "Hearty Beef" in the microwave for 90 seconds, following the instructions.

Poured the result into a bowl, fluffed with a fork.

It smelled like old socks.

Didn't taste (and yes, I tasted) any better than it smelled. Yecch! Tabasco couldn't save this stuff.

I'm not sure I could eat this crap if it was all I had after a hurricane. Who thinks up this stuff, and (more importantly) who approves it for production?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 5:54:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 5:54:39 PM EDT by mjohn3006]
Yes. The perservitive they use to keep that stuff "fresh" ruins it.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 5:56:38 PM EDT
The Uncle Bens is no better. I tried it once, could not eat it.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 5:59:49 PM EDT
Think that's bad, try this:
www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn6185


Army rations rehydrated by urine

* 19:00 21 July 2004
* Exclusive from New Scientist Print Edition
* Duncan Graham-Rowe

Would you eat food cooked in your own urine? Food scientists working for the US military have developed a dried food ration that troops can hydrate by adding the filthiest of muddy swamp water or even peeing on it.

The ration comes in a pouch containing a filter that removes 99.9 per cent of bacteria and most toxic chemicals from the water used to rehydrate it, according to the Combat Feeding Directorate, part of the US Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Massachusetts. This is the same organisation that created the "indestructible sandwich" that will stay fresh for three years (New Scientist print edition, 10 April 2002).

The aim is to reduce the amount of water soldiers need to carry. One day's food supply of three meals, weighs 3.5 kilograms but that can be reduced to about 0.4 kilograms with the dehydrated pouches, says spokeswoman Diane Wood.

The pouch - containing chicken and rice initially - relies on osmosis to filter the water or urine. When two solutions of different concentrations are separated by a semipermeable membrane, with gaps that allow only water molecules to pass through, the water is drawn to the more concentrated side.
Hungry soldier

The membranes are made of thin sheets of a cellulose-based plastic, with gaps between the fibres that are just 0.5 nanometres across, too small for bacteria to pass through.

A hungry soldier pours dirty water into one end of a foil sachet containing two inner pouches separated by the membrane. The water seeps through the membrane into the dehydrated food on the other side. As it dissolves large molecules in the food, it creates a very high concentration solution. The osmotic pressure created then draws more water through the membrane.

Hydration Technology of Albany, Oregon, which makes the membrane, says soldiers should only use urine in an absolute emergency because the membrane is too coarse to filter out urea.

The body will not find this toxic over the short term, says Ed Beaudry, an engineer with HTI, but rehydrating food this way in the long term would cause kidney damage





Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:00:22 PM EDT
The Frozen Rice packs are very good.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:02:45 PM EDT
I have had good luck with the Zatarans Jambalaya...I slice some andui(sp?) sausage into it, Yummie!!!


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:11:49 PM EDT
OMFG!!!




Originally Posted By Chairborne:
Think that's bad, try this:
www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn6185


Army rations rehydrated by urine

* 19:00 21 July 2004
* Exclusive from New Scientist Print Edition
* Duncan Graham-Rowe

Would you eat food cooked in your own urine? Food scientists working for the US military have developed a dried food ration that troops can hydrate by adding the filthiest of muddy swamp water or even peeing on it.

The ration comes in a pouch containing a filter that removes 99.9 per cent of bacteria and most toxic chemicals from the water used to rehydrate it, according to the Combat Feeding Directorate, part of the US Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Massachusetts. This is the same organisation that created the "indestructible sandwich" that will stay fresh for three years (New Scientist print edition, 10 April 2002).

The aim is to reduce the amount of water soldiers need to carry. One day's food supply of three meals, weighs 3.5 kilograms but that can be reduced to about 0.4 kilograms with the dehydrated pouches, says spokeswoman Diane Wood.

The pouch - containing chicken and rice initially - relies on osmosis to filter the water or urine. When two solutions of different concentrations are separated by a semipermeable membrane, with gaps that allow only water molecules to pass through, the water is drawn to the more concentrated side.
Hungry soldier

The membranes are made of thin sheets of a cellulose-based plastic, with gaps between the fibres that are just 0.5 nanometres across, too small for bacteria to pass through.

A hungry soldier pours dirty water into one end of a foil sachet containing two inner pouches separated by the membrane. The water seeps through the membrane into the dehydrated food on the other side. As it dissolves large molecules in the food, it creates a very high concentration solution. The osmotic pressure created then draws more water through the membrane.

Hydration Technology of Albany, Oregon, which makes the membrane, says soldiers should only use urine in an absolute emergency because the membrane is too coarse to filter out urea.

The body will not find this toxic over the short term, says Ed Beaudry, an engineer with HTI, but rehydrating food this way in the long term would cause kidney damage






Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:12:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JBowles:
The Frozen Rice packs are very good.

Whose?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:16:34 PM EDT
Shrug. I eat the microwave rice all the time and it tastes fine.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 6:32:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KBaker:

Originally Posted By JBowles:
The Frozen Rice packs are very good.

Whose?



VIP steamworks


Its like making popcorn

just nuke the bag and it get all big, then its ready to eat
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 12:46:06 AM EDT
Cool.. if you play it in reverse you can have dehydrated piss....... Just add water!
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 12:51:51 AM EDT
There's better tasting stuff out there, for sure.

MREs are too friggin' heavy. I feel sorry for you guys that have to lug them around in a pack.
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 12:54:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By heysoos:
OMFG!!!




Originally Posted By Chairborne:
Think that's bad, try this:
www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn6185


Army rations rehydrated by urine

* 19:00 21 July 2004
* Exclusive from New Scientist Print Edition
* Duncan Graham-Rowe

Would you eat food cooked in your own urine? Food scientists working for the US military have developed a dried food ration that troops can hydrate by adding the filthiest of muddy swamp water or even peeing on it.

The ration comes in a pouch containing a filter that removes 99.9 per cent of bacteria and most toxic chemicals from the water used to rehydrate it, according to the Combat Feeding Directorate, part of the US Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Massachusetts. This is the same organisation that created the "indestructible sandwich" that will stay fresh for three years (New Scientist print edition, 10 April 2002).

The aim is to reduce the amount of water soldiers need to carry. One day's food supply of three meals, weighs 3.5 kilograms but that can be reduced to about 0.4 kilograms with the dehydrated pouches, says spokeswoman Diane Wood.

The pouch - containing chicken and rice initially - relies on osmosis to filter the water or urine. When two solutions of different concentrations are separated by a semipermeable membrane, with gaps that allow only water molecules to pass through, the water is drawn to the more concentrated side.
Hungry soldier

The membranes are made of thin sheets of a cellulose-based plastic, with gaps between the fibres that are just 0.5 nanometres across, too small for bacteria to pass through.

A hungry soldier pours dirty water into one end of a foil sachet containing two inner pouches separated by the membrane. The water seeps through the membrane into the dehydrated food on the other side. As it dissolves large molecules in the food, it creates a very high concentration solution. The osmotic pressure created then draws more water through the membrane.

Hydration Technology of Albany, Oregon, which makes the membrane, says soldiers should only use urine in an absolute emergency because the membrane is too coarse to filter out urea.

The body will not find this toxic over the short term, says Ed Beaudry, an engineer with HTI, but rehydrating food this way in the long term would cause kidney damage











I would rather starve than pour piss through a filter to eat something...

"Hey Fred...come over here and piss in this thing...

Link Posted: 4/8/2006 12:57:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KBaker:
I'm not sure I could eat this crap if it was all I had after a hurricane. Who thinks up this stuff, and (more importantly) who approves it for production?



WTF are you worried about hurricanes for?

You should worry about hoards of Californians coming into your state following "The Big One."
Top Top