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Posted: 3/14/2006 7:25:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/30/2006 9:58:24 AM EDT by Hokie]




My levels are at 220. I'm 31. Guess I'd better change my 'eat whatever, drink whatever' lifestyle to something more nutritional. Funny, as you get older your immortality starts to go away.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:33:15 AM EDT
What are they supposed to be at?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:33:39 AM EDT
Like your an old man at 31! No more Mikey D for you!
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:34:33 AM EDT
I cut out the carbs, and started exercising...mine dropped, and have stayed down, in a matter of weeks...that was 2 years ago and mine are still down. Just watch what you eat, and stay active...you'll be fine.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:36:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 7:36:24 AM EDT by Mr45auto]
what the hell is a triglyceride???

( GOOGLE IS NOT MY FRIEND!!!)
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:38:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FAL:
I cut out the carbs, and started exercising...mine dropped, and have stayed down, in a matter of weeks...that was 2 years ago and mine are still down. Just watch what you eat, and stay active...you'll be fine.



That's my approach too I think - I don't take care of myself very well, but manage to keep myself and weight in control by staying active through my job. However it's not the gym and my diet ... well, I don't have a diet!

I'm not out of shape but I'm not exactly IN shape either. Guess I'll make some adjustments! 220 though, that set off an alarm when I heard that. "Normal" is supposed to be around or below 150.

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:40:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mr45auto:
what the hell is a triglyceride???

( GOOGLE IS NOT MY FRIEND!!!)




Pasted from a google search. Not trying to be a smartass but I had no idea until I read the following:

Triglycerides are the chemical form in which most fat exists in food as well as in the body. They're also present in blood plasma and, in association with cholesterol, form the plasma lipids.

Triglycerides in plasma are derived from fats eaten in foods or made in the body from other energy sources like carbohydrates. Calories ingested in a meal and not used immediately by tissues are converted to triglycerides and transported to fat cells to be stored. Hormones regulate the release of triglycerides from fat tissue so they meet the body's needs for energy between meals.

How is an excess of triglycerides harmful?

Excess triglycerides in plasma is called hypertriglyceridemia. It's linked to the occurrence of coronary artery disease in some people. Elevated triglycerides may be a consequence of other disease, such as untreated diabetes mellitus. Like cholesterol, increases in triglyceride levels can be detected by plasma measurements. These measurements should be made after an overnight food and alcohol fast.

The National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines for triglycerides are:

Normal Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high 150 to 199 mg/dL
High 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high 500 mg/dL or higher
These are based on fasting plasma triglyceride levels.


AHA Recommendation — Dietary treatment goals

Changes in lifestyle habits are the main therapy for hypertriglyceridemia. These are the changes you need to make:

If you're overweight, cut down on calories to reach your ideal body weight. This includes all sources of calories, from fats, proteins, carbohydrates and alcohol.
Reduce the saturated fat and cholesterol content of your diet.
Reduce your intake of alcohol considerably. Even small amounts of alcohol can lead to large changes in plasma triglyceride levels.
Be physically active for at least 30 minutes on most or all days each week.
People with high triglycerides may need to substitute monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — such as those found in canola oil, olive oil or liquid margarine — for saturated fats. Substituting carbohydrates for fats may raise triglyceride levels and may decrease HDL ("good") cholesterol in some people.
Substitute fish high in omega-3 fatty acids instead of meats high in saturated fat like hamburger. Fatty fish like mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon are high in omega-3 fatty acids.
Because other risk factors for coronary artery disease multiply the hazard from hyperlipidemia, control high blood pressure and avoid cigarette smoking. If drugs are used to treat hypertriglyceridemia, dietary management is still important. Patients should follow the specific plans laid out by their physicians and nutritionists.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:44:04 AM EDT
Yup, Im 28 and my cholesterol is 215. Im not overweight, 5' 10" 175, but it runs in my family. I really need to start watching what I eat, but pizza is so frickin good!

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:45:18 AM EDT
I'm a 37 year old fat slob ( well chubby anyhow) I eat everything that's bad for me and it shows. I quite frankly dont exercise nearly enough. My Doc said I had excellent cholesterol levels and all blood work looks great. With a family history of heart disease and my personal eating habits I wonder what the correlation really is??

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:50:59 AM EDT
Exercise will help.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:53:10 AM EDT
Stop putting so much butter on your Lobster!!!..............And stay out of Jay's Oyster Bar...if it is still there!!!!
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:54:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mr45auto:
I'm a 37 year old fat slob ( well chubby anyhow) I eat everything that's bad for me and it shows. I quite frankly dont exercise nearly enough. My Doc said I had excellent cholesterol levels and all blood work looks great. With a family history of heart disease and my personal eating habits I wonder what the correlation really is??


I don't think there is a 100% link to diet and excersize and genes.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 8:16:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 8:19:06 AM EDT by 53vortec]
About three years ago I had a routine checkup, and my triglycerides were through the roof.

I knew that wouldn't stand. I went to a low carb (not no carb) diet of my own design, and started a reasonable fitness routine - two months later my triglycerides were normal.

IM me if you want more info, particularly on the diet. It didn't bother me, and I used to be nicknamed "Wimpy" for my affection of cheeseburgers!
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 8:28:43 AM EDT
Double cheeseburger please... Don't worry about it... it will only cut off the last few years of your life. You know, when you can't getup, can't walk etc...

Eat less candy too . Thats what I'm attempting to do.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 8:40:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 9:03:16 AM EDT by rkbar15]
Reduce your BMI with weight loss and exercise and replace carbs with fat and protein. You need to go on a low carb way of eating for life and not a "diet".

Replace fast acting carbs from cakes, cookies, breads, pasta and starchy vegetables with slow acting carbs from green leafy vegetables (avocados, broccoli, green beans, spinach, asparagus, celery, cauliflower, brussel sprouts etc). Increase your intake of fats from olive oil, fish, tree nuts, eggs and some meats.

ETA: You should also take a high EPA fish oil supplement.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 9:00:27 AM EDT
It's all crap.

I'm 6'2" 200lbs, 34" waist, good shape, exercise 30 min a day, cardio and weights.


My cholesterol is 325, (triglycerides only 43!)


Mine's hereditary, but I'm not sacrificing liver function by taking the meds they want me to.


Live life, then die.



roy d.....I'll die with a smile and a half eaten steak in front of me, not choking on a radish.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 11:26:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 11:27:01 AM EDT by H46Driver]
Square that away. Two years ago I was carrying 15-20 pounds more than today and was getting total cholesterol numbers in the 220s/230s.

Most recent numbers after tightening up my eating habits (less sausage pizza and more salmon). Numbers in parentheses are normal or good values. Lower is better for every entry except HDLs.

Total Cholesterol 204 (200)
Triglycerides 71 (150)
HDL 76
LDL 114 (130)
VLDL 14 (50)
Risk Factor 2.7 (4)


Lower than they were 10 years ago when I was 28. There is a significant genetic component to this stuff, but diet and exercise have an effect as well.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 11:37:09 AM EDT
I'm gonna put some real effort into this...it struck a cord with me, especially now that I'm a father.

My initial guess based on my own knowledge of how I conduct my life...is that a modification to diet and my exercise routine will help significantly. I hope.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 11:52:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 11:53:25 AM EDT by AzSteven]

Originally Posted By warlord:

Originally Posted By Mr45auto:
I'm a 37 year old fat slob ( well chubby anyhow) I eat everything that's bad for me and it shows. I quite frankly dont exercise nearly enough. My Doc said I had excellent cholesterol levels and all blood work looks great. With a family history of heart disease and my personal eating habits I wonder what the correlation really is??


I don't think there is a 100% link to diet and excersize and genes.



Definitely true - my dad has been pretty much the same as Mr45auto; no problems depsite poor diet/exercise regimen. Meanwhile, my brother the cop/fitness nut with the very healthy diet is very careful about his meals, is in PRIME condition physically, and reguarly gets chided for bad cholesterol. His doctor admits that some folks are just naturally blessed or cursed; the diet and exercise can help, but are not necessarily a cure-all.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:00:10 PM EDT
If you can lower it with diet and exercise, that's the way to go. Otherwise, you might want to look at statins.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:12:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By Mr45auto:
what the hell is a triglyceride???

( GOOGLE IS NOT MY FRIEND!!!)




Pasted from a google search. Not trying to be a smartass but I had no idea until I read the following:

Triglycerides are the chemical form in which most fat exists in food as well as in the body. They're also present in blood plasma and, in association with cholesterol, form the plasma lipids.

Triglycerides in plasma are derived from fats eaten in foods or made in the body from other energy sources like carbohydrates. Calories ingested in a meal and not used immediately by tissues are converted to triglycerides and transported to fat cells to be stored. Hormones regulate the release of triglycerides from fat tissue so they meet the body's needs for energy between meals.

How is an excess of triglycerides harmful?

Excess triglycerides in plasma is called hypertriglyceridemia. It's linked to the occurrence of coronary artery disease in some people. Elevated triglycerides may be a consequence of other disease, such as untreated diabetes mellitus. Like cholesterol, increases in triglyceride levels can be detected by plasma measurements. These measurements should be made after an overnight food and alcohol fast.

The National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines for triglycerides are:

Normal Less than 150 mg/dL
Borderline-high 150 to 199 mg/dL
High 200 to 499 mg/dL
Very high 500 mg/dL or higher
These are based on fasting plasma triglyceride levels.


AHA Recommendation — Dietary treatment goals

Changes in lifestyle habits are the main therapy for hypertriglyceridemia. These are the changes you need to make:

If you're overweight, cut down on calories to reach your ideal body weight. This includes all sources of calories, from fats, proteins, carbohydrates and alcohol.
Reduce the saturated fat and cholesterol content of your diet.
Reduce your intake of alcohol considerably. Even small amounts of alcohol can lead to large changes in plasma triglyceride levels.
Be physically active for at least 30 minutes on most or all days each week.
People with high triglycerides may need to substitute monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — such as those found in canola oil, olive oil or liquid margarine — for saturated fats. Substituting carbohydrates for fats may raise triglyceride levels and may decrease HDL ("good") cholesterol in some people.
Substitute fish high in omega-3 fatty acids instead of meats high in saturated fat like hamburger. Fatty fish like mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon are high in omega-3 fatty acids.
Because other risk factors for coronary artery disease multiply the hazard from hyperlipidemia, control high blood pressure and avoid cigarette smoking. If drugs are used to treat hypertriglyceridemia, dietary management is still important. Patients should follow the specific plans laid out by their physicians and nutritionists.


All good points but missing one important fact, that being intake of trans-fats from artificially hydrogenated vegetable oils is a MAJOR contributor to triglycerides in the blood. Why? Because the body absorbs fats after the action of the lipase enzymes on the triglycerides. But trans fats are not fully reduced into its composition of three fatty acids and a glycerol by the action of lipases. The absorption of these mono and diglycerides into the blood is where most triglycerides in the blood comes from. Because the blood is rich in fatty acids, these mono and diglycerides quickly reform triglycerides through the process of esterification.

So, what to do? Eliminate your consumption of hydrogenated vegetable oil products. Fortunately, recent laws have mandated the disclosure of trans fat content so one could carefully read the label but its best to avoid these hydrogenated vegetable oils. Modern packaging has eliminated the need (rancidity) for such oils.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:18:48 PM EDT
damn Keith, you are wise in the ways of Lipid Management <- healthy sugar free beer
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:32:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:
damn Keith, you are wise in the ways of Lipid Management <- healthy sugar free beer



You are welcome..and beer contains NO trans fats! Neither does scotch!

I am on a low trans fat diet. I eat a ton of pork because pigs cannot be fed any trans fats, unlike fowl, beef or fish. Wild fish is ok as is venison. I buy my eggs from a local farmer who ranges her flock so they are also free of trans fats.

So I only buy wild fish or pork at the store. Since the better half is a non-feather or furred animal consumer, she only eats fish and eggs. But she is cool with my piggie consumption as it keeps the ROPs away . And piggies are kept clean, unlike cattle or chickens. A clean piggie is a happy piggie.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:37:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
damn Keith, you are wise in the ways of Lipid Management <- healthy sugar free beer



You are welcome..and beer contains NO trans fats! Neither does scotch!



whew!!!

For a minute there I was getting REAL nervous about this!
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:40:35 PM EDT
Hi Hokie and welcome to the club.

31 here and my triglycerides are too high.

Simple solution: Try to reduce fats and eat leaner meat. Exercise a little more. If you are successful at gaining such self mastery, please let me know how so I can do it too.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:47:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:




My levels are at 220. I'm 31. Guess I'd better change my 'eat whatever, drink whatever' lifestyle to something more nutritional. Funny, as you get older your immortality starts to go away.



Pfffft....

At my retirement physical last month, my triglycerides were 897.

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 12:49:37 PM EDT
What about the Omega 3 in Flax seed instead of the fish oil variety?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:01:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 3:12:07 PM EDT by rkbar15]

Originally Posted By Riotgun:
At my retirement physical last month, my triglycerides were 897.




What was your fasting blood glucose? If you are overweight and your blood glucose and BP are also elevated you are setting yourself up for some very serious medical problems in the coming years.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:07:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 3:07:37 PM EDT by rkbar15]

Originally Posted By Shane333:
Hi Hokie and welcome to the club.

31 here and my triglycerides are too high.

Simple solution: Try to reduce fats and eat leaner meat. Exercise a little more. If you are successful at gaining such self mastery, please let me know how so I can do it too.



Dietary intake of fat has very little effect on total cholesterol levels and almost no effect on triglyceride levels for the vast majority of people. Excess carbohydrates are the primary cause of abnormal triglycerides.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:11:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rkbar15:

Originally Posted By Riotgun:
At my retirement physical last month, my triglycerides were 897.




What was your fasting blood glucose?



I dunno, I haven't got a copy of it yet. They just called me and told me that my triglycerides were 897 and cholesterol was 261.

From my last physical in June 2005, my triglycerides were 569 and my glucose was 93. Does that mean something?

My doctor told me that the triglycerides are probably hereditary. My liver enzymes were normal (whatever that means).
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:22:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 3:23:31 PM EDT by slaughter]

Originally Posted By Riotgun:

Originally Posted By rkbar15:

Originally Posted By Riotgun:
At my retirement physical last month, my triglycerides were 897.




What was your fasting blood glucose?



I dunno, I haven't got a copy of it yet. They just called me and told me that my triglycerides were 897 and cholesterol was 261.

From my last physical in June 2005, my triglycerides were 569 and my glucose was 93. Does that mean something?

My doctor told me that the triglycerides are probably hereditary. My liver enzymes were normal (whatever that means).



You're fine, this whole tri and cholesteral stuff is really being pushed by



the pharmaceutical companies -- the people who make the pills.

And the docs are going with it.

It isn't half as bad as they are telling people.

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:25:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Riotgun:

Originally Posted By rkbar15:

Originally Posted By Riotgun:
At my retirement physical last month, my triglycerides were 897.




What was your fasting blood glucose?



I dunno, I haven't got a copy of it yet. They just called me and told me that my triglycerides were 897 and cholesterol was 261.

From my last physical in June 2005, my triglycerides were 569 and my glucose was 93. Does that mean something?

My doctor told me that the triglycerides are probably hereditary. My liver enzymes were normal (whatever that means).



If your triglycerides are over 400 some of the other cholesterol levels will not be accurate unless they were directly measured. You did fast for these blood tests; correct?

You should follow-up with your doctor as he knows your complete medical history. You might also consider seeing another doctor for a second opinion on the cause of your elevated triglycerides.

Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:28:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zeekh:
What about the Omega 3 in Flax seed instead of the fish oil variety?



Freshly ground flax seed is good but you should still take a fish oil supplement or eat fatty fish.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:33:32 PM EDT
Well, the pill companies are getting their money.

I did fast for the tests.

My doctor said I should cut down on red meats, alcohol, and smoking. I told her if I have to give all that up, why would I want to live?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 3:56:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RoyDamnMercer:
It's all crap.

I'm 6'2" 200lbs, 34" waist, good shape, exercise 30 min a day, cardio and weights.
My cholesterol is 325, (triglycerides only 43!)
Mine's hereditary, but I'm not sacrificing liver function by taking the meds they want me to.
Live life, then die.

roy d.....I'll die with a smile and a half eaten steak in front of me, not choking on a radish.



At the age of 92, no doubt.

You should really screw with your doc. "You know, I feel so good I think I'll take up smoking..."

Jim
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 4:02:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:




My levels are at 220. I'm 31. Guess I'd better change my 'eat whatever, drink whatever' lifestyle to something more nutritional. Funny, as you get older your immortality starts to go away.



I am 36 posted numbers like that for several years. The Doc put me on meds now it's 160. Genetics ain't it a bitch.
Link Posted: 3/30/2006 9:57:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/30/2006 9:59:00 AM EDT by Hokie]
Whew...

Total Cholesterol: 215
Good Stuff: 47
Bad: 127
Triglycerides: 207
Glucose: 79

I ain't dead yet!!!

I'm gonna go gnaw on a head of lettuce and run around the block tonight, see if I can drop it another couple points. Then go get an ice cream.
Link Posted: 3/30/2006 10:10:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:




My levels are at 220. I'm 31. Guess I'd better change my 'eat whatever, drink whatever' lifestyle to something more nutritional. Funny, as you get older your immortality starts to go away.



220 isnt that bad. You did fast properly before the test? Exercise and some change in diet should take care of it.
Link Posted: 3/30/2006 10:19:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rxdawg:

Originally Posted By Hokie:




My levels are at 220. I'm 31. Guess I'd better change my 'eat whatever, drink whatever' lifestyle to something more nutritional. Funny, as you get older your immortality starts to go away.



220 isnt that bad. You did fast properly before the test? Exercise and some change in diet should take care of it.



yeah I drank water for 24 hours straight with nothing else in my diet, then went for the test. I was told a modest adjustment to my lifestyle and diet would fix it outright. Figure it's a good investment of energy, so I'm gonna do it.
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