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Posted: 3/13/2006 5:07:55 PM EDT
I saw a recreation of the Kennedy assassination on the Discovery channel the other week.

To see how much a bullet deforms, they shot it through a log at very close range(a few yards.) The bullet was relatively undamaged when recovered, in fact it looked almost pristine.

When they shot a simulated human torso at a distance of 70 yards or so, the bullet struck a "bone"(I believe it was a pig's bone.) The bullet deformed quite a bit.

My question is: why does a bullet deform to a lesser degree when fired at very close range into wood than it does from glancing off a bone at much greater distance?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 5:12:51 PM EDT
Probably because wood is less dense than bone. Or at least most wood.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:11:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Coop_K:
I saw a recreation of the Kennedy assassination on the Discovery channel the other week.

To see how much a bullet deforms, they shot it through a log at very close range(a few yards.) The bullet was relatively undamaged when recovered, in fact it looked almost pristine.

When they shot a simulated human torso at a distance of 70 yards or so, the bullet struck a "bone"(I believe it was a pig's bone.) The bullet deformed quite a bit.

My question is: why does a bullet deform to a lesser degree when fired at very close range into wood than it does from glancing off a bone at much greater distance?



The bullet had an opportunity to yaw (turn sideways) going through Kennedy & Connally.

The bullet fired into the log never yawed...it remained point-forward, so it didn't get squeezed like a tube of toothpaste in its penetration
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