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Posted: 3/9/2006 11:01:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2006 11:11:01 AM EDT by COLE-CARBINE]
Raytheon's Virtual Battlefield Software Provides Advanced Simulation Capability

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., March 9, 2006 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon Company has
developed virtual-battlefield software -- building on imagery supplied by
sensors and algorithms -- that automatically recognizes and tracks targets for
a variety of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems
operated by military and government customers.

The company can simulate a war game battle plan, complete with imagery of
hostile convoys in motion, persistent surveillance of them from air and space,
and a successful missile attack, on the screen of a laptop computer for
maximum portability. The simulation, which portrays ways for allied forces to
detect hostile activity deep within the borders of potential adversaries, is
based on the Silent Hammer naval exercise recently conducted off the coast of
Southern California.

Characterized as a "virtual crystal ball" by Dr. Ken Moore, director of
advanced concepts and architectures at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems
(SAS), the technology integrates the highest-fidelity simulations in industry
and government of current and likely future products, systems and concepts of
operations.

"Raytheon is the premier electronics company for the Department of
Defense," Moore said. "We needed a way to show our customers how we use the
highest-fidelity weapons and C3 (command, control, communications) ISR
simulations in industry to help them solve their most difficult problems. We
can do this because we build the systems and know more about them and their
capabilities than anyone."

The team's objective was to display the power, agility and speed of
Raytheon solutions enabled by Moore's Enterprise Modeling and Simulation team.
Among other things, modeling and simulation allows a manufacturer to test its
products and systems and evaluate alternatives through realistic and animated
electronic imagery played on computer screens to create, perhaps, the
consummate "what-if" possibility.

Drawing upon the Silent Hammer exercise, a scenario imagines that "Red
Country," Southern California, is preparing an amphibious assault.

The Raytheon simulation displays persistent surveillance measures employed
by coalition forces to monitor Red activities at four inland military bases
hidden by mountain ranges or distance from the sensors of manned and unmanned
surveillance aircraft. Convoys are observed by airborne and space-based
sensors en route to a railhead where missile launchers are spotted awaiting
transport to the coast by train.

The simulation then enlists the Navy's next-generation destroyer, DD(X),
on which Raytheon is the lead systems integrator. The ship launches a
loitering Raytheon Tomahawk missile. Its initial mission is to fly over
convoys and train to gather more information about the cargoes.

Eventually, the train is determined to be the target of highest value. To
avoid having to hit a moving objective, the missile is directed to strike the
tracks ahead of the engine, stopping it and preventing the missile launchers
from reaching the coast.

Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) is the leading provider of
sensor systems giving military forces the most accurate and timely information
available for the network-centric battlefield. With 2005 revenues of $4.2
billion and 13,000 employees, SAS is headquartered in El Segundo. Additional
facilities are in Goleta, Calif.; Forest, Miss.; Dallas, McKinney and Plano,
Texas; and several international locations.

Link Posted: 3/9/2006 11:05:58 AM EDT
Sweet. Sounds like the theory behind "Gun Kata" in the movie "Equilibrium".

They took different algorithms and observed responses in gunfights and developed a fighting style to maximize accuracy and move to positions where return fire would be innefective.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 12:49:20 PM EDT

The team's objective was to display the power, agility and speed of
Raytheon solutions enabled by Moore's Enterprise Modeling and Simulation team.
Among other things, modeling and simulation allows a manufacturer to test its
products and systems and evaluate alternatives through realistic and animated
electronic imagery played on computer screens to create, perhaps, the
consummate "what-if" possibility.

Drawing upon the Silent Hammer exercise, a scenario imagines that "Red
Country," Southern California, is preparing an amphibious assault.



I thought this line was pretty interesting. Wasn't "Silent Hammer" conducted about 2 years ago?
I also thought "Silent Hammer" was to mostly test the Ohio class Tactical Trident conversion submarine. I wonder what the reasoning was to launch a Tomahawk from a simulated DDX instead of the SSGN?
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 5:32:37 PM EDT
night crew bump
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 5:34:06 PM EDT
bots
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