Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 3/6/2006 5:05:01 PM EDT
Guys,
I have decide to build my own garage. Are any of you familiar with the all inclusive kits you can buy from 84 lumber? It seems like a good way to go. The problem is that they do not really display what the garage looks like before you get the plans. Do you know of a way of seeing them ahead of time. Have any of you built one. I want a 2 car garage with little extra room for workbenches.
Let me know what you know
Belgianbeast
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:06:25 PM EDT
its never big enough
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:07:19 PM EDT
install a floor drain
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:09:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DeadSled:
its never big enough



Precisely. Whatever you decide for the overall square footage, double it. Within two years, it will still be too small.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:13:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2006 5:14:04 PM EDT by Belgianbeast]

Originally Posted By AILapua:

Originally Posted By DeadSled:
its never big enough



Precisely. Whatever you decide for the overall square footage, double it. Within two years, it will still be too small.



I agree. Used to have 3 car garage plus two level 26x40 barn but can not afford much more than two car garage where I live now (space and $). And it will be 24x28 that I do not have now
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:14:34 PM EDT
8" pad
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:14:56 PM EDT
First and foremost, check on building permits. I've heard too many stories of people having to jump through hoops because they built something and didnt get the permits.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:15:58 PM EDT
Ask your local 84 to give you names/addresses of some kits that they've delivered.Also,they can change it around easily to suit your needs.Add length,or height.A good idea is to set it on 3 course of block,then just get taller doors.That way,you can fit regular sized vehicles,and the bottom is more secure from critters getting in,rot,wash down water,etc.They do it right there on the computer for you.Dave
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:22:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:
First and foremost, check on building permits. I've heard too many stories of people having to jump through hoops because they built something and didnt get the permits.



Oh yes
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:23:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dave15:
Ask your local 84 to give you names/addresses of some kits that they've delivered.Also,they can change it around easily to suit your needs.Add length,or height.A good idea is to set it on 3 course of block,then just get taller doors.That way,you can fit regular sized vehicles,and the bottom is more secure from critters getting in,rot,wash down water,etc.They do it right there on the computer for you.Dave



3 course of blocks is a very good way to go. How hard is it to lay blocks?
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:25:10 PM EDT
Didn't someone else here just build a nice garage themselves?
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:26:58 PM EDT
Build the whole thing from blocks. The cost won't be much different, it's fire proof, easier to heat/cool and wind wont push it over. You can paint it any color you want.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:31:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Build the whole thing from blocks. The cost won't be much different, it's fire proof, easier to heat/cool and wind wont push it over. You can paint it any color you want.



Easier to cool, yes. Easier to heat, no. I own a block bldg, the thing is an icebox in the winter even in mild GA winters.

rj
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:31:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Belgianbeast:

Originally Posted By Dave15:
Ask your local 84 to give you names/addresses of some kits that they've delivered.Also,they can change it around easily to suit your needs.Add length,or height.A good idea is to set it on 3 course of block,then just get taller doors.That way,you can fit regular sized vehicles,and the bottom is more secure from critters getting in,rot,wash down water,etc.They do it right there on the computer for you.Dave



3 course of blocks is a very good way to go. How hard is it to lay blocks?




Volunteer to help a mason one Saturday.
My father built a place in the late 40's.Told me he had never laid block before (REAL cinder blocks).Said he figured time he got up to grade,he'd know what he was doing and it'd look good enough.He was right.It's still standing.
Building it all out of block is great in that it's stronger,no need to side or finish interior,and cost effective,but unless you have done alot and have some speed (and help) it'll take forever.Dave
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:32:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rjay:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Build the whole thing from blocks. The cost won't be much different, it's fire proof, easier to heat/cool and wind wont push it over. You can paint it any color you want.



Easier to cool, yes. Easier to heat, no. I own a block bldg, the thing is an icebox in the winter even in mild GA winters.

rj



You could get those foam insulation sheets and put them on the inside.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:35:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rjay:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Build the whole thing from blocks. The cost won't be much different, it's fire proof, easier to heat/cool and wind wont push it over. You can paint it any color you want.



Easier to cool, yes. Easier to heat, no. I own a block bldg, the thing is an icebox in the winter even in mild GA winters.

rj



Hmmm? Maybe it was my wood burning heater versus whatever you were using? It stayed toasty. YMMV
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:49:43 PM EDT
I see this posting is already going way down in the list. I guess I should have posted something about electrocuting myself or Hillary Clinton making a funny face.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 6:38:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Belgianbeast:
I see this posting is already going way down in the list. I guess I should have posted something about electrocuting myself or Hillary Clinton making a funny face.


Maybe if you say you intend to electrocute Hillary Clinton in your new garage you'll get more notice.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:10:11 PM EDT
plenty of power, lots of light. tall doors for real trucks. radiant floor heating is nice. phone, networking, cable


beer fridge
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:12:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:17:36 PM EDT
1) Know what you are doing when you order concrete.


2) Ask Ready mix supplier for "test cylinders" to be brought out with the load. Fill them up when you pour.

Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:35:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Specop_007:

Originally Posted By rjay:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Build the whole thing from blocks. The cost won't be much different, it's fire proof, easier to heat/cool and wind wont push it over. You can paint it any color you want.



Easier to cool, yes. Easier to heat, no. I own a block bldg, the thing is an icebox in the winter even in mild GA winters.

rj



You could get those foam insulation sheets and put them on the inside.



Use insulated concrete forms.

I would form out and pour concrete over laying three courses of block. When you consider, price of block, Mason, delivery, mortor. Solid concrete is better. You can sub out some if the concrete work cheaper than doing it yourself.

On the last garage I slanted the slab out othe door. About 1/8 inch per foot. It hoses out real nice. I also built it (stick built) on a small concrete wall as others suggested. Use a footing below the frost line and use slab heating if you are going to heat it. If you do plan to eat it and its stick built, frame with 2 by six for extar insulation. Install plastic under the slab to keep the moisture down.

Good luck,
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:45:35 PM EDT
Bigger is allways better ! Bought plans & material for a 24'x38' at our local Menards store, $6,000 for a stick building, add concrete, wiring,extra Ins and infloor heating along with 9' doors $15,000 total investment. Property value increased $25,000 as did the taxes.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:47:46 PM EDT
I would just do a pole barn.


Get it large enough that you can just park the cars sloppy and be fine.


General Steel is always advertising theirs.......
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 8:20:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
I would just do a pole barn.


Get it large enough that you can just park the cars sloppy and be fine.


General Steel is always advertising theirs.......



General Steel is over $10 a square foot. How much for the 84 Lumber kits?

I will be building one myself, 2 cars with shop and storage loft. I don't like the vinyl siding of the 84 kits but genuine Hardy siding panel would be fine.

How about steel stud framing? This is also fire resistant, something most people don't realize is VERY important for parking automobiles and the bikes.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 3:07:03 AM EDT
Tag for later
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 3:23:15 AM EDT
I had an all block garage, and now I have a concrete slab + wood garage. Both are very cold in the winter, but the one with the wood/insulated sides seems to heat up faster in the winter.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 3:50:21 AM EDT
Leave a pit for quick oil changes

I'll be building one myself when I move out of here.

Min. of 4 car wide by 4 deep.
Concrete floor on steel decking/framing, allowing a basement.
Living accomodations above.
Min of 200 amp service
Floor drainage.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 3:54:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 4:07:08 AM EDT
Tag.

Link Posted: 3/8/2006 4:31:24 AM EDT
If you want to do block and aren't confident of you masonry skills, consider using the block and surface bonding cement. This is a cement with short strands of fiberglass. The process is about as simple as it gets. Embed first course of block in your footing/floor (half a block is sufficient), stack remaining block to the desired height, trowel on the surface bonding cement over both the inside and outside of the block wall to a depth of around 1/8"...let set (24-48 hrs), finish installing roof and remainder of ammenities...

The stuff is a little pricey, but it's FAST and easy to do (an $8 bag covers up to about 40 sq ft or so) and it holds up at least as well as a typical block wall. My father and I did his shop with this stuff back in the late 70's, it's still holding up just fine. We've used it to reinforce a block seawall and it too did a super job...the stuff's for real.

As far as other advice? a BIG +1 on extra outlets, and slope your floor...oh yeah, have a pro do the floor and footing, it's just faster and easier for them...and you know it'll be done right.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 4:36:46 AM EDT
Wood on concrete: treated
Slab: A little too thick, make triple sure you won't have water problems at the doors. Rubber seals do not work and splashing water falling off the roof during the rain will put water around and under.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 4:41:53 AM EDT
I found that this place builds a great product, and will work with you to customize as necessary.

www.mastergaragebuilders.com/

The garage is prebuilt in sections, arrives on one big-ass trailer, and assembled with the help of a crane and a crew of 3 or 4 guys.

I had them do a 24'X30' (2 1/2 car) with a 15'X30' loft.

Below is a pic with what they leave you with. Since then we added a driveway, sidewalks, and stained the building barn red. A cat 3 hurricane did nothing to faze it.

We paid $23K, about 6 years ago..., not including site prep. Prices have definately gone up, but I believe it was a great deal for the speed and quality.


Link Posted: 3/8/2006 7:54:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hsvhobbit:
If you want to do block and aren't confident of you masonry skills, consider using the block and surface bonding cement. This is a cement with short strands of fiberglass. The process is about as simple as it gets. Embed first course of block in your footing/floor (half a block is sufficient), stack remaining block to the desired height, trowel on the surface bonding cement over both the inside and outside of the block wall to a depth of around 1/8"...let set (24-48 hrs), finish installing roof and remainder of ammenities...

The stuff is a little pricey, but it's FAST and easy to do (an $8 bag covers up to about 40 sq ft or so) and it holds up at least as well as a typical block wall. My father and I did his shop with this stuff back in the late 70's, it's still holding up just fine. We've used it to reinforce a block seawall and it too did a super job...the stuff's for real.

As far as other advice? a BIG +1 on extra outlets, and slope your floor...oh yeah, have a pro do the floor and footing, it's just faster and easier for them...and you know it'll be done right.



Good idea! I will have to make the slab a bit larger but that will work. Plus I will fill the cores of the blocks under the rafters with rebar and concrete and cap with a good tie down plate. I might even attach the rebar to the slab foundation. Now I am thinking of prefab steel joists and rafters with metal roof to make it 100% fireproof.

This approach makes the block wall go up faster and look much better. With filled cores under the ceiling joists and rafters, its also quite sturdy. Now to find a small crete pumper to fill the cores fast!
If I fill the remaining cores with blow-in insulation, it shouldn't be too hard to heat and cool.

BTW, the electical service panel by the meter has a 200 A breaker! It used to service two houses...now only one. Yes, 3 phase x-former! I'll need a sump pump to have plumbing service due to elevation but am thinking of central drain since the walls will be waterproof.

Link Posted: 3/8/2006 12:35:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/8/2006 12:38:08 PM EDT by Keith_J]
I am going with a surface-bonded dry stack concrete block construction with concrete filled and rebar cores every 24" . I found a kick ass DIY plans for a stucco sprayer which will speed application of the fiberglass-reinforced stucco.
The plans are FREE! DIY stucco sprayer, worked for surface-bonded dry stack concrete blocks That crazy Canuck is gogin to use his for MAKING A STRAW BALE HOUSE! He has used it for surface bonded dry stack so I know it will work.

This is very economical construction because the structure is the siding and it looks great, unlike a regular mortar bonded block. And since the blocks will be filled with insulation, it will be damn easy to heat and cool.

Hell yes I will have a half bath. Might even put in a shower. Its going to be 24' x 26' with standing seam metal roof and storage loft above the cars.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 3:59:50 PM EDT
I'm building right now.
30' x 55'. Full poured concrete footer/foundation. 2 bays open up to the rafters, two bays with a second floor above. I have steel columns supporting 14" steel beams above the bays, with one beam supporting rafters and the other supporting floor joists.
my framing is a 2x6 balloon frame.
I designed it myself, and I'm doing most of the construction. I won't be pouring the floor.

No pictures now, I don't know how to post them.

I was setting the first rafters tonight, the second floor and sheathing are done. I've been working nights and weekends since christmas.

I don't have any problem with the kits, they go up pretty easy, but I thought I knew just what I wanted
Top Top