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Posted: 3/5/2006 9:25:37 PM EDT
Any of you have one of these?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:34:16 PM EDT
yes
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:35:32 PM EDT
Yup. I loved it as a kid.

Good rifle to learn on too. Teaches bolt action and apeture sights. My 9 month old has his name on it now.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:41:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 9:43:51 PM EDT by MOGWAR]
I want to get one for my seven year old daughter, she has shot my 10/22 and loved it but being a tiny little girl even it was too big, so I'm thinking that a Chipmunk rifle of her own might keep her interested for a while.

ETA I'm probably going to spring for one, should I stick with irons or go with a scope, the irons are a good basic learning tool but the scope might be more fun for her.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:46:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 9:53:22 PM EDT by FishKepr]
Since she liked it, what about a reduced stock for the 10/22? Or is it too heavy?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:50:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MOGWAR:
I want to get one for my seven year old daughter, she has shot my 10/22 and loved it but being a tiny little girl even it was too big, so I'm thinking that a Chipmunk rifle of her own might keep her interested for a while.

ETA I'm probably going to spring for one, should I stick with irons or go with a scope, the irons are a good basic learning tool but the scope might be more fun for her.



Stick with the irons. Shooting should be fun enough.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:52:26 PM EDT
I remember when the Chipmunk was a simple, ultra-basic training rifle. The last one I saw had a laminated thumbhole stock and a bull barrel, and was still as light as a feather. Damn, that thing was nice!
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:56:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:03:27 PM EDT
My daughter had a chipmunk, but we traded it for a Savage Cub. The Savage fit her better, and had a better trigger, at least she thinks so.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:10:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FishKepr:
Since she liked it, what about a reduced stock for the 10/22? Or is it too heavy?


probaby still too heavy, my daughter is a munchkin, she has the skills and mind of a seven year old and the size of a skinny four year old.

BTW I love the pics beekeeper. Thats my girl if she had dark hair.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:12:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MOGWAR:

Originally Posted By FishKepr:
Since she liked it, what about a reduced stock for the 10/22? Or is it too heavy?


probaby still too heavy, my daughter is a munchkin, she has the skills and mind of a seven year old and the size of a skinny four year old.

BTW I love the pics beekeeper. Thats my girl if she had dark hair. This is her, bandaids fake tatoos and all.
i6.photobucket.com/albums/y206/MOGWAR/DSCN2743.jpg

Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:25:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 10:26:25 PM EDT by thebeekeeper1]
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:40:24 PM EDT
This is a great thread. I have been wanting to take my 10y/o niece out and teach her to shoot. Then when she gets old enough, to the highpower matches we go.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 10:52:51 PM EDT
Ruger is now making a compact version of the 10/22 and it only weighs 4 1/2 lbs.

www.ruger-firearms.com/Firearms/FAProdView?model=1168&return=Y
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:18:36 PM EDT
Bought one in '84. Well crafted and great for teaching kids to shoot.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:48:18 PM EDT
It's called an AR
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 12:58:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
This month is her birthday and tomorrow I'm ordering a Handy Rifle in .223 as her first "deer rifle." She will kill a deer with it in Missouri this October in the Youth Hunt. Add a Leupold scope, cut the stock down, and she will be deadly with it.


Awwww, man, get her a T/C Contender, and, separately, a carbine kit in .223! Those things are perfect for kids -- she can switch to .22LR for shooting tin cans and water balloons, then move up to .45/70 when she wants to kill a buffalo. As long as it's purchased as a pistol, she can then switch back to a handgun setup for metallic silhouette competition too.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 2:57:12 AM EDT
Mogwar,
Both of my sons received one for their 8th birthday. Keep 'em simple, no scope, plane wood stock IMHO. The are available in a few colors now, pink among them

My sons out grew them by the time they were 13 or 14yrs but they still have a fine weapon to teach their children markmanship.

Let me phrase it this way...

You'll regret NOT getting one for her. The few dollars one costs is nothing compared to the gain you and your daughter will have in ownership.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 3:18:49 AM EDT
Can chipmonks use rifles?

I'd thing the length of pull would be prohibitive for thier little paws.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 4:00:11 AM EDT
My neighbor's son has one, he loves it.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 4:06:36 AM EDT
I went with the CZ 452 Youth for my kids.
OUTSTANDING little rifle.

+1 on the balloons.Kids love targets that DO SOMETHING.Clay birds,water filled jugs,etc.

I also use old magazine and calender pics of game animals.Helps them pick THE spot.

Glad to see y'all involving the little ones!Dave
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 7:02:28 PM EDT
Hey, thanks for the advice and I can hardly wait to get one of these miniature rifles for my daughter.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 7:04:34 PM EDT
50BMG

go big or go home
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 6:37:37 AM EDT
My nephew has one. Great little learner gun.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 6:52:24 AM EDT
chipmunks are a fine rifle but if you want to step up a bit i would highly recommed a ruger 10-22. i would buy an extra synthetic stock and cut the "factory" wood stock way down and when they get older stick on the synthetic. you have a tone of options with the 10-22. it's a way better gun that will last them their life.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:05:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/7/2006 7:06:09 AM EDT by Cape_hunter]

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Originally Posted By MOGWAR:
BTW I love the pics beekeeper. Thats my girl if she had dark hair.
i6.photobucket.com/albums/y206/MOGWAR/DSCN2743.jpg



Thanks.

Not to hijack too much, but here she is at my grandmother's 90th birthday party. While everyone else was eating cake she wanted to shoot her Red Ryder--

photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=28961


ETA: Crap--I hit "Submit" too soon. I wanted to say your little girl is a doll!



She looks pretty serious. SHe has that "I am a Secret Service Sniper" look about her!
Great pic!
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 9:19:48 AM EDT
I got one for my daughter....in PINK . She enjoys shooting it.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 9:34:54 AM EDT
I had one, had a camouflage stock on it. Somebody stole it.



I want to get another one. Where can they be found?
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 9:39:53 AM EDT
The older models were great. They used to be made by-hand in Oregon...The old man who made them died (or was committed, or something like that) back around 1994 IIRC and the company got sold by his kids to some international outfit so if you can find an old one buy it.

The newer ones aren't half bad, but they sure aren't the old hand-made ones.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 9:53:53 AM EDT
Not a chipmonk but a crickett. Fun little rifle. They are bolt bolt action, manual cock. That means you need to pull back the charging rod in the back of the bolt once it's home to fire it. I got one for my kids. It takes some time to load and hopefully they will get the idea that every round counts (esp if they have to work at it). The only thing I wish they would add are some feed ramps. PIA for my larger fingers to load into the chamber. It can fire short, long, long rifle. This one has a bull barrel, a scope, thumbhole, laminated stock. But there are a lot of variaties if you check out Davey Crickett rifles. Not plugging them, but for kiddies, thats what I got, along with the 10/22, Marlin 39A, Marlin 983s, and the bushy in 22. Varity of rifle actions.
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