Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 3/5/2006 10:54:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 10:55:41 AM EDT by 1GUNRUNNER]
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:00:56 AM EDT
Dude, that thing is awesome! You need to find a hit and miss engine now. Try ebay for starters.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:06:01 AM EDT
Damn dude!!! you are about 2 months too late. I have a 10 horse 3 phase motor that I left at the house with the ex because I never found a use for it. (got it off previous employer for free!!!) Would have gladly shipped it to you for only the cost of shipping.

But, the planer is SWEET
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:08:19 AM EDT
I am so jealous right now. You scored well my friend. How did you find that jewell ?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:08:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:09:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:12:56 AM EDT
WOW $ 400.00 !!!!!!!!! you must have had a hard time keeping a straight face paying for it
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:21:58 AM EDT
My gawd. That thing looks scary. I have a 14" jointer that would go well with that?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:25:56 AM EDT
Nice score.

Do you think it will work?

Looks like it needs a good refurb.

Are parts available for that thing?

Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:34:00 AM EDT
WILL THAT BUFF OUT?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:35:29 AM EDT
So what does this machine do?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:38:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:39:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:39:43 AM EDT
Use that to remove your gallbladder and be sure to post pics and video.



Nice looking planer.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:44:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By MSKOOTER:
So what does this machine do?



Planes.



Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:46:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 11:48:52 AM EDT by R-32]

Originally Posted By 19suburban96:
WOW $ 400.00 !!!!!!!!! you must have had a hard time keeping a straight face paying for it



The reason he could not keep a straight face is because he bought it from the Nudist Camp up the street from me.

Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:46:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:47:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 11:50:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 11:51:46 AM EDT by R-32]

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By R-32:

Originally Posted By 19suburban96:
WOW $ 400.00 !!!!!!!!! you must have had a hard time keeping a straight face paying for it



The reason he could not keep a straight face is because he bought it from the Nudist Camp up the street from me.




Forgot to mention that part.



Ya know that Lake Bronson has parks all over the US, You could get yourself and TRG one of those membership things, and no matter where you two lovers end up. you can have a place to crash.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 12:02:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 12:19:03 PM EDT

Before I clicked on the link, I thought "Yeah, right, it isn't OLD until you need to run the leather belt from the planer pulley to the steam engine or water wheel output."

Then I clicked... Okay, it's old.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 12:21:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 12:32:00 PM EDT
Awesome find. Definitely get a 10HP motor for that beast, anything less and you will regret it. After a cleaning and servicing it will probably spit out lumber better than a brand new machine bought today.


My co-worker's step father was a carpenter/furniture builder and had some 50s-70s era USA made tools. He passed away last year and now all his tools are stored in a garage. From what he told me, he maintained his tools like they were his children and still has all the user manuals. I only wish they would be offered for sale; I hate to be a dick and ask.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 4:58:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_G:
Awesome find. Definitely get a 10HP motor for that beast, anything less and you will regret it. After a cleaning and servicing it will probably spit out lumber better than a brand new machine bought today.


My co-worker's step father was a carpenter/furniture builder and had some 50s-70s era USA made tools. He passed away last year and now all his tools are stored in a garage. From what he told me, he maintained his tools like they were his children and still has all the user manuals. I only wish they would be offered for sale; I hate to be a dick and ask.



A planer is a planer. It dimensions wood. I'm sure that planer with the proper service and motor(probably about $800-$1000 for decent new 3 ph 10 hp motor) will dimension wood. Will it work better than a new machine? Most certainly not, but it will probably outlast most stuff built today. Most industrial planers today, such as SCMI, Altendorf, Buttfering ect., are designed to be finish planers, with micro adjustment capabilities, multi knife helical heads, sound control, speed control, and quick change blade features. They also start at about $20k and go up to about 200k. At $400 you probably can't go wrong if you are mechanically inclined. The exposed belts and drive gears are VERY SCARY. BE CAREFUL. I have an old 14" jointer (NORFOLK 1950) that has been in the back of the shop for years after being replaced. I need to find it a new home. Interested?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 5:28:05 PM EDT
how does a nudist colony end up with such a thing?
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 5:34:08 PM EDT
Just curious, why would you want a three phase motor? Do you have three phase power at your shop? If so you are one lucky mofo. I'd love to get three phase. Equipment is so much cheaper.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 5:37:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 6:47:35 PM EDT
Whoa! talk about a flash back. That thing was orginally set up for power by an over head belt drive I bet. My Dad got one almost exactly like that from a friend who had it sittiing in a field for years. It had a 24 inch wide bed and would open up to 12 inches of depth. We used a Toyota 4 cyl engine and manual transmission to drive the cutter head and used the powersteering pump and hydraulic motor to drive the rollers (he removed the cogs that synch the rollers to the cutters). He put in a hyrdraulic "throttle" to control the feed speed. To make it go all you had to do was start the engine in neutral, apply the clutch lever, put the tranny in 3rd gear, and slooowly release the clutch. It was awesome!! The whole thing was mounted on a trailer and it would make some nice boards. You could literally put in a couple of railroad tie sized boards at a time if you wanted to.

After my Dad died it was sold to settle his estate. I wish I would have kept it. It was a cool conversation piece to say the least. When people would come over he would start it and demonstrate it for them! He also built a sawmill. He always wanted a sawmill but was too cheap to buy one so he constructed one over a two year period. It startd one Christmas when my youger brother gave my Dad a Honda 550 Four for xmas. Dad took the motorcycle apart and used the engien and transmission as the main powerplant. It was basically a monster badn saw that elevated and traversed along the log. It was awesome! It had not muffler and when we would cut logs the neighbors wouyld coem out to drink beer and watch the machine at work. It had hydrraulics for log turning and clamping as well as a hydro motor traverse the saw carriage.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 8:32:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By clippen:

Originally Posted By A_G:
Awesome find. Definitely get a 10HP motor for that beast, anything less and you will regret it. After a cleaning and servicing it will probably spit out lumber better than a brand new machine bought today.


My co-worker's step father was a carpenter/furniture builder and had some 50s-70s era USA made tools. He passed away last year and now all his tools are stored in a garage. From what he told me, he maintained his tools like they were his children and still has all the user manuals. I only wish they would be offered for sale; I hate to be a dick and ask.



A planer is a planer. It dimensions wood. I'm sure that planer with the proper service and motor(probably about $800-$1000 for decent new 3 ph 10 hp motor) will dimension wood. Will it work better than a new machine? Most certainly not, but it will probably outlast most stuff built today. Most industrial planers today, such as SCMI, Altendorf, Buttfering ect., are designed to be finish planers, with micro adjustment capabilities, multi knife helical heads, sound control, speed control, and quick change blade features. They also start at about $20k and go up to about 200k. At $400 you probably can't go wrong if you are mechanically inclined. The exposed belts and drive gears are VERY SCARY. BE CAREFUL. I have an old 14" jointer (NORFOLK 1950) that has been in the back of the shop for years after being replaced. I need to find it a new home. Interested?



All tools are not created equally. You're right, an industrial machine costing several thousand dollars will do an excellent job on lumber with all the features you described. The planer he bought will most probably do a better job than a comparable unit from Powermatic, General Tool, Delta, or a few of the other manufacturers that most shops usually purchase from today. The machines you described are generally used in mills and plants, not small/medium shops. So for a roughly $1,500 investment when all is said and done, I think he did better than buying a new unit (I'd be surprised if most of the top end machines from the makers I mentioned aren't made in Taiwan these days too).
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 1:43:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2006 1:52:48 AM EDT by R-32]

Originally Posted By torstin:
how does a nudist colony end up with such a thing?



Im willing to bet it came with the property...

This area used to be very strong in the timber businesses, there are lots of old mills in the area. It is not uncommon to be hunting around here and find old broken down Steam Donkeys, and left over tracks.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:01:47 AM EDT
I'm so frigging jealous. Would love to find something sweet liike that to replace my 13" planer.

You need to pimp it out by adding a Byrd shelix cutter head to it.



Link Posted: 3/6/2006 7:14:33 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 8:22:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
Gonna try and get it running as is at the moment.



You are sooo gonna put yer eye out.

Nice find BTW. One thing to note: Make sure to torque the bolts holding the knives in properly, I've had a old planar (c. 1910) throw the knives and rip a hole in the side of the building...Loc-tite might be a good idea as well.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 11:52:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 11:55:44 AM EDT
Yeah hit and miss engine would just about do it.

Watch your fingers!
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 11:58:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 11:59:06 AM EDT
Check evil bay for motors and drives.

I picked up a 3ph 7HP motor for $65 that was new in the wrap from Graingers!
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 12:54:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 1:11:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 1:11:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ranxerox911:

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
Gonna try and get it running as is at the moment.



You are sooo gonna put yer eye out.

Nice find BTW. One thing to note: Make sure to torque the bolts holding the knives in properly, I've had a old planar (c. 1910) throw the knives and rip a hole in the side of the building...Loc-tite might be a good idea as well.



And maybe weld up a shield around the pully and gears, to keep important body parts from being caught in it.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 1:37:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By Ranxerox911:
Nice find BTW. One thing to note: Make sure to torque the bolts holding the knives in properly, I've had a old planar (c. 1910) throw the knives and rip a hole in the side of the building...Loc-tite might be a good idea as well.





Now you got me concerned.



Maybe if you are lucky, It will throw one of those knives, and hit you in the gallbladder.

Link Posted: 3/11/2006 3:40:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_G:

Originally Posted By clippen:

Originally Posted By A_G:
Awesome find. Definitely get a 10HP motor for that beast, anything less and you will regret it. After a cleaning and servicing it will probably spit out lumber better than a brand new machine bought today.


My co-worker's step father was a carpenter/furniture builder and had some 50s-70s era USA made tools. He passed away last year and now all his tools are stored in a garage. From what he told me, he maintained his tools like they were his children and still has all the user manuals. I only wish they would be offered for sale; I hate to be a dick and ask.



A planer is a planer. It dimensions wood. I'm sure that planer with the proper service and motor(probably about $800-$1000 for decent new 3 ph 10 hp motor) will dimension wood. Will it work better than a new machine? Most certainly not, but it will probably outlast most stuff built today. Most industrial planers today, such as SCMI, Altendorf, Buttfering ect., are designed to be finish planers, with micro adjustment capabilities, multi knife helical heads, sound control, speed control, and quick change blade features. They also start at about $20k and go up to about 200k. At $400 you probably can't go wrong if you are mechanically inclined. The exposed belts and drive gears are VERY SCARY. BE CAREFUL. I have an old 14" jointer (NORFOLK 1950) that has been in the back of the shop for years after being replaced. I need to find it a new home. Interested?



All tools are not created equally. You're right, an industrial machine costing several thousand dollars will do an excellent job on lumber with all the features you described. The planer he bought will most probably do a better job than a comparable unit from Powermatic, General Tool, Delta, or a few of the other manufacturers that most shops usually purchase from today. The machines you described are generally used in mills and plants, not small/medium shops. So for a roughly $1,500 investment when all is said and done, I think he did better than buying a new unit (I'd be surprised if most of the top end machines from the makers I mentioned aren't made in Taiwan these days too).



I agree, I didn't think he did bad, I wish him luck and hope to see a pic of that machine hawgin wood. I work in a small custom funiture shop and have been lucky enough to use some extremely high end equiptment. I also agree with fabricating up a sheild for the gears and belts. Not only would I check and locktight the knife retention screws as I would on a new machine, but, I would check ALL bolts, shafts, keys, ect. I wonder if some of you realize the RPM and amount of strain on moving parts under a small work load. Safety first.
Link Posted: 3/11/2006 4:58:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/11/2006 4:58:49 PM EDT by 1GUNRUNNER]
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 8:04:05 PM EDT
I agree with clippen about checking all the nuts, bolts, screws, shafts, etc. and making sure nothing is bent, corroded/pitted enough to throw a part out of spec. etc.

I don't know how much work it would be to fabricate such a device, but one of the best ways to prevent kickback on a jointer or planer is to never feed a piece of wood into it shorter than the width of the bed. In your case, 24". This prevents the piece from being able to turn and get thrown back by the knives.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 5:14:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 5:28:37 PM EDT
I have a rebuilt chevy 350 in the garage that should spin them knives just fine.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 5:29:42 PM EDT
Here is a good resource for info: "http://www.owwm.com/Menu/new_logo.jpg"
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:52:15 PM EDT
Steam engine and over head belts, why stop half way?

You could probably get a machine shop to fab up some anti-kickback devices by scaling up something used on a saw.

And definitely not stand "behind" it in any case
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 10:06:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 10:07:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 11:27:29 PM EDT
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top