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Posted: 3/2/2006 12:18:20 PM EDT
Alot of my gun projects lately, I end up making some sort of aluminum something or other adapter type of something to attach a stock or other something.

What should I get to do light machining on aluminum?

Typically I'm using bar stock, aqnd fabricating something.

I'm willing to spend up to $2K.



Link Posted: 3/2/2006 1:14:47 PM EDT
A milling machine?
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 1:23:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 71-Hour_Achmed:
A milling machine?



Something like that. I'm not really knowedgeable on metal working.

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 1:40:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By garandman:
Alot of my gun projects lately, I end up making some sort of aluminum something or other adapter type of something to attach a stock or other something.

What should I get to do light machining on aluminum?

Typically I'm using bar stock, aqnd fabricating something.

I'm willing to spend up to $2K.






What you are looking for is a vertical mill. Looks like a drill press with a table that can move in three directions. For $2K you're not going to find much, but try Harbor Freight or Northern Tools for cheap stuff.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 1:55:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ranxerox911:

Originally Posted By garandman:
Alot of my gun projects lately, I end up making some sort of aluminum something or other adapter type of something to attach a stock or other something.

What should I get to do light machining on aluminum?

Typically I'm using bar stock, aqnd fabricating something.

I'm willing to spend up to $2K.






What you are looking for is a vertical mill. Looks like a drill press with a table that can move in three directions. For $2K you're not going to find much, but try Harbor Freight or Northern Tools for cheap stuff.



Better yet, there are plenty of old mills from machine shops around. I'd rather have an well made old US or Japanese made mill than a Chinese one from HF or NT. Try looking for a repair shop, they would have leads for used equipment.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 2:38:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 2:39:41 PM EDT by KS_Physicist]
Too bad you're in SC, if you were closer to Kansas City my brother-in-law would be able to help you out. Machinists know where to get cheap used mills...

He does have one Harbor Freight type machine in his workshop. He used it as his 'main' production machine until he bought his new C&C mill. It's been a pretty useful mill, and he still uses it for one-off stuff if the C&C is in use.

I think it's something like this one. (Edit: No, his is similar, but much larger.)

Jim
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 2:45:44 PM EDT
This is the only way to go. www.taigtools.com/mmill.html

Stay away from Grizzly if you want a precision machine.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 2:59:36 PM EDT
around here you can get a good used bridgport around a grand with som tooling and didgitail read outs to but you will need three phase to run them or a hundreddollar phase converter.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:01:54 PM EDT
An older, late 60's earlt 70's 'J' Head Bridgeport with the small table,( 9" X 36" ) can be had for under 2g's. Perfect size for the 'Home' machinest. Stop in at some local machine shops and ask if they know where you might find one. I found mine that way, was a little rusty and needed paint, but for $500.00, I
couldnt pass it up.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:09:34 PM EDT
At the risk of looking like a snob, I wouldn't invest the cash in a mill unless it is a Bridgeport. There are many of these machines that still work well after many decades of use. I'd shop online for used Bridgeports, and become somehwhat knowledgable about how they function. Some of the older machines may be somewhat sloppy/loose, but can always be rebuilt. There's always a machine shop going out of business, especially with manual mills, so an informed buyer MAY be able to pick one up for $2000.

Good luck.

M.L.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:10:20 PM EDT
if you can't do it with a dremel it's not worth doing
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:17:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gunner1X:
This is the only way to go. www.taigtools.com/mmill.html

Stay away from Grizzly if you want a precision machine.



the taig are awesome, me and my brother have converted 2 of them too CNC operated and they are great little machines.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:20:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 3:20:27 PM EDT by Cypher214]

Originally Posted By logem:
At the risk of looking like a snob, I wouldn't invest the cash in a mill unless it is a Bridgeport. There are many of these machines that still work well after many decades of use. I'd shop online for used Bridgeports, and become somehwhat knowledgable about how they function. Some of the older machines may be somewhat sloppy/loose, but can always be rebuilt. There's always a machine shop going out of business, especially with manual mills, so an informed buyer MAY be able to pick one up for $2000.

Good luck.

M.L.



+1

Bridgeport is the best for manual mills.

Our shop had one that was built in the early 80's and it worked as good as new.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:54:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 3:58:53 PM EDT by jchewie]
Shop around for a used Bridgeport or similar style import knee mill, or buy new if you can swing it.
My engineering workplace consolidated equipment when we moved buildings, and sold a 9x48 Tiawan made mill that was in great shape for $400. I had no idea that the price was so low, or I would have bid on it.

If you get a minimill you will probably outgrow it pretty quickly. They don't have all that much space between the table and the quill.

Head over to here or here for more info.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:59:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 3:59:41 PM EDT by cduarte]

Originally Posted By Cypher214:

Originally Posted By logem:
At the risk of looking like a snob, I wouldn't invest the cash in a mill unless it is a Bridgeport. There are many of these machines that still work well after many decades of use. I'd shop online for used Bridgeports, and become somehwhat knowledgable about how they function. Some of the older machines may be somewhat sloppy/loose, but can always be rebuilt. There's always a machine shop going out of business, especially with manual mills, so an informed buyer MAY be able to pick one up for $2000.

Good luck.

M.L.



+1

Bridgeport is the best for manual mills.

Our shop had one that was built in the early 80's and it worked as good as new.



+1million... and I paid $650 for mine, which was made in the 60s and works fine.


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