Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 3/2/2006 4:59:14 AM EDT

I am planning on building a workbench this weekend (It sounds like a good project at least). I wouldlike to see some of your layouts and PLANS if you have them.

I want something that I can store all my cleaning stuff on, and build some sort of rack for my tools. I also plan on putting a small drill press on there for misc stuff, and a small vise, so I need help with a design sturdy enough for the vise so I can do some twisting, I also plan on building a rack to hang my dremel from and use the snake attachment. I also plan on leaving room for my reloader, whenever I finally get around to ordering one......

If you can provide me with some pictures of your setup, that would be great......, Plans would be EVEN BETTER.

Also if you could help me build up a list of tools, (Other than the obvious AR-15/Gun Tools). Like brass hammer, Types of pliers.... Im trying to get everything togather and get an extra set. (I am building this in my garage, so I don't have to go out to the building everytime I need to get a tool for a gun.



Thanks,
Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:08:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 5:10:51 AM EDT by wildearp]
This is an old pic, but a quick way to get the bench together. It now wraps around the room and the press is on the other wall. The bench top is over 2" thick.



My 'outside' bench is on 4" polyurethane wheels with locks, 2" 0.120"wall square tubing frame with 1/2" aluminum top. Only a vise is mounted. Drill press is in a separate area. Bench is 3'x 6'. I can't get pics right away. It is the ultimate in simplicity, and has been used for a ton of welding and AR building.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:14:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:
This is an old pic, but a quick way to get the bench together. It now wraps around the room and the press is on the other wall. The bench top is over 2" thick.

photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=32576



Was hoping for more ultility type benchs, but thanks for sharing. Got enough reloading stuff?

This is the one im thinking about building right now.
Think it will be sturdy enough?, What can I coat it with also to keep it chemical resistant.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:18:13 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:19:47 AM EDT
The bench in your link is strong enough, but if you are really going to be doing some tweaking/twisting, you might consider additional anchoring to the floor or wall.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:20:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
i picked up some free workbench plans from lowes and built one for my shop. took about 2 hours and about 80.00 worth of lumber.

one thing i found... use the thickest deck you can afford.



Yea if I go with the plan above, I plan on modifying it slightly and using bigger legs/supports/deck.

So wheres the pics?
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:22:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:
The bench in your link is strong enough, but if you are really going to be doing some tweaking/twisting, you might consider additional anchoring to the floor or wall.



Yes I plan on anchoring it to the wall, The floor is not really an options, I don't want to put anything into the concrete in case I want to move it later on.

I just need to find pegboard, it doesn't look like my local HD/Lowes sell it.

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:23:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:25:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
i picked up some free workbench plans from lowes and built one for my shop. took about 2 hours and about 80.00 worth of lumber.

one thing i found... use the thickest deck you can afford.



Yea if I go with the plan above, I plan on modifying it slightly and using bigger legs/supports/deck.

So wheres the pics?



to be honest the frame is more than sturdy. i way about 225 and got uip on the deck and jumped up and down on it to see how sturdy it was. it never flexed a bit. will try to get some pics this afternoon.




Cool thanks. So you think if I use the one I linked too and just use a thicker deck (mainly outta personal pref.), it will be fine, especially it is bolted to the wall too.

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:27:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 5:28:35 AM EDT by NewbHunter]

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By wildearp:
This is an old pic, but a quick way to get the bench together. It now wraps around the room and the press is on the other wall. The bench top is over 2" thick.

photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=32576



Was hoping for more ultility type benchs, but thanks for sharing. Got enough reloading stuff?

This is the one im thinking about building right now.
Think it will be sturdy enough?, What can I coat it with also to keep it chemical resistant.



I built two workbenches for my gun/reloading room a couple of months ago. I didn't use any plans, but just kind of made it up as I went. It turned out pretty similar to what is linked in your post. The only difference, and what I would highly recommend, is that I added some diagonal supports on the sides and back.

From the look of the bench in that link it will torque and twist a bit, especially if you are cranking on a vise or reloader handle. Adding one cross member to the back and one to each side makes a big difference in making the bench have a solid feel.

I don't have any pictures on my computer, but I can take some tonight and post them tomorrow.

Basically the benches I made are comprised of a double thickness of 2x4's for the frame, 1 layer of 3/4" MDF for the bottom shelf, and 2 layers of 3/4" MDF for the bench surface. They are VERY HEAVY, but very sturdy.

I plan on adding some drawers to it later.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:29:21 AM EDT
If you can get ahold of an old door or two they make great counters for the bench.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:30:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NewbHunter:

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By wildearp:
This is an old pic, but a quick way to get the bench together. It now wraps around the room and the press is on the other wall. The bench top is over 2" thick.

photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=32576



Was hoping for more ultility type benchs, but thanks for sharing. Got enough reloading stuff?

This is the one im thinking about building right now.
Think it will be sturdy enough?, What can I coat it with also to keep it chemical resistant.



I built two workbenches for my gun/reloading room a couple of months ago. I didn't use any plans, but just kind of made it up as I went. It turned out pretty similar to what is linked in your post. The only difference, and what I would highly recommend, is that I added some diagonal supports on the sides and back.

From the look of the bench in that link it will torque and twist a bit, especially if you are cranking on a vise or reloader handle. Adding one cross member to the back and one to each side makes a big difference in making the bench have a solid feel.

I don't have any pictures on my computer, but I can take some tonight and post them tomorrow.

Basically the benches I made are comprised of a double thickness of 2x4's for the frame, 1 layer of 3/4" MDF for the bottom shelf, and 2 layers of 3/4" MDF for the bench surface. They are VERY HEAVY, but very sturdy.

I plan on adding some drawers to it later.



Yea I was thinking about this as I was getting a material list togather, I think I will take one 2x4 and run it at an angle from top to bottom/front to back, and then on the other side the oposite way, and running two in the backk towards the middle.

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:32:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By NewbHunter:

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By wildearp:
This is an old pic, but a quick way to get the bench together. It now wraps around the room and the press is on the other wall. The bench top is over 2" thick.

photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/Attachments/DownloadAttach.asp?iImageUnq=32576



Was hoping for more ultility type benchs, but thanks for sharing. Got enough reloading stuff?

This is the one im thinking about building right now.
Think it will be sturdy enough?, What can I coat it with also to keep it chemical resistant.



I built two workbenches for my gun/reloading room a couple of months ago. I didn't use any plans, but just kind of made it up as I went. It turned out pretty similar to what is linked in your post. The only difference, and what I would highly recommend, is that I added some diagonal supports on the sides and back.

From the look of the bench in that link it will torque and twist a bit, especially if you are cranking on a vise or reloader handle. Adding one cross member to the back and one to each side makes a big difference in making the bench have a solid feel.

I don't have any pictures on my computer, but I can take some tonight and post them tomorrow.

Basically the benches I made are comprised of a double thickness of 2x4's for the frame, 1 layer of 3/4" MDF for the bottom shelf, and 2 layers of 3/4" MDF for the bench surface. They are VERY HEAVY, but very sturdy.

I plan on adding some drawers to it later.



Yea I was thinking about this as I was getting a material list togather, I think I will take one 2x4 and run it at an angle from top to bottom/front to back, and then on the other side the oposite way, and running two in the backk towards the middle.

Josh



On mine I just ran one length along the back from top to bottom, from one corner to the other. Going to the middle might be agood idea too, but mine is plenty sturdy. It made a pretty big difference just adding those three pieces of wood.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:34:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 5:35:02 AM EDT by Old_Painless]
The plan you have will work well.

But I would suggest one change.

I built my top out of a piece of 3/4 OSB, glued and screwed to a piece of 3/4 Plywood. I then put an edge around the top and left it 1/4 inch proud. I then placed and screwed a piece of 1/4 inch Masonite on the top of the bench.

That way, when the top of the bench gets banged up, as they will, you can remove the Masonite and replace it and have a new bench.

Good luck with the project.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:34:54 AM EDT
Cool thanks. I hope to see some pictures soon.

I still gotta get up a toollist though
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:36:24 AM EDT


Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:36:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
The plan you have will work well.

But I would suggest one change.

I built my top out of a piece of 3/4 OSB, glued and screwed to a piece of 3/4 Plywood. I then put an edge around the top and left it 1/4 inch proud. I then placed and screwed a piece of 1/4 inch Masonite on the top of the bench.

That way, when the top of the bench gets banged up, as they will, you can remove the Masonite and replace it and have a new bench.

Good luck with the project.



I have seen the light :p. I was looking for chemical resistant wood coatings but this sounds like the ticket.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:38:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ANGST:
www.cornbread.com/~angst/gunroom.jpg

Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.



Is this sturdy enough for you?

Doesnt look like you have a vise on there, but do you do any prying on the table?
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:39:03 AM EDT
I built mine out of a solid core door blank from Lowe's (as the top) with 6x6 legs. I also have 2x6s around the top just under the door blank to provide a little more rigidity. Pretty simple setup. I don't have any pictures, but it's not really that complicated to figure out. The legs are lag-bolted to the top (countersunk) with 4 lag bolts per leg. The 2x6s are just screwed together and then screwed to the top and to the legs with regulare wood screws. I then poly urethaned the whole thing to fill in the holes and provide a smooth surface.

I have my loader mounted on it, and a vice. It's not even attached to the wall, and it does not move when I work on it.

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:43:35 AM EDT
I put together one of these based on NRMA plans.



Plans are online here.

Very sturdy, based on 4x4 legs. The upper shelves are optional, I put my own together to increase benchtop space.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:47:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vsound:
I built mine out of a solid core door blank from Lowe's (as the top) with 6x6 legs. I also have 2x6s around the top just under the door blank to provide a little more rigidity. Pretty simple setup. I don't have any pictures, but it's not really that complicated to figure out. The legs are lag-bolted to the top (countersunk) with 4 lag bolts per leg. The 2x6s are just screwed together and then screwed to the top and to the legs with regulare wood screws. I then poly urethaned the whole thing to fill in the holes and provide a smooth surface.

I have my loader mounted on it, and a vice. It's not even attached to the wall, and it does not move when I work on it.




Does the poly hold up to chemicals like, breakfree powderblast, and clp etc...?
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:48:15 AM EDT
Here are a couple pics of the bench I built. I used the old door that used to go into the garage from the kitchen for the top of one bench. And the other I used an old desktop that I found in the basement. I bought my mom's old place. I'm refinishing the basement and I didn't have time to organize my stuff yet. Forgive the mess! I built these out of 1x3 boards that I had from taking beams down in the dining room and living room. It seems pretty sturdy. I can dance on them.

This is my first time posting pics so I hope we don't get any red x's! I'm not sure how well it will resize either.





Smalls
Sgt. of Marines
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:52:36 AM EDT
Smalls that looks pretty nice, its even better when you don't have to go buy the wood to make it isnt it . Seems like a lot of people go the door route it sounds like.

Thanks for sharing the pics.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:52:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ANGST:
www.cornbread.com/~angst/gunroom.jpg

Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.



Your workbench is on the space shuttle???

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:53:30 AM EDT
I used 3/16" by 1.5" Angle Iron, made 8' long and 2' deep and 3' tall.

Built two rectangles 2'x8' of angle iron... Tig Welded at the corners
Attached the legs at all four corners by the same method...
Top rectangle at the top of said legs and the second rectangle inverse to the top one and 8" above the floor... the bottom shelf is made from Expanded Metal to allow debris to fall through...
The original design I wanted a steel top 1/2" thick but have not been able to get to that yet so in the interim I used 2x6 lumber for the top these need to be screwed in place or alternatively you could use 3/4" Plywood cut a sheet in half and sandwich both pieces on top then bolt them down.
5" Vises on both ends... this bench is designed... for a machineshop type environment...
We use it in the Gunshop and it takes a pounding and has stayed together... I still want the Steel top though...
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:56:58 AM EDT
I wish I had pics of the one I left in Miami.

Over six feet long, built out of 2x4's with a door and layer of MDF for the top.

Storage shelves on each end, cabinet on front left for tools, set of nail/screw drawers on front right, back edge with outlets, front-mounted screwdriver/drill chargers.

Gonna have fun building another one, though.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:59:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 2:51:45 PM EDT by FALARAK]
Lowes. $150.


I used the MDF that came with it.... and put a combi stain and poly, and it REALLY makes a difference on how long the top will last, shed oil/water/grease, etc. Cleanup is a snap, and it looks so much better as well.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:59:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
I wish I had pics of the one I left in Miami.

Over six feet long, built out of 2x4's with a door and layer of MDF for the top.

Storage shelves on each end, cabinet on front left for tools, set of nail/screw drawers on front right, back edge with outlets, front-mounted screwdriver/drill chargers.

Gonna have fun building another one, though.



Sounds really nice!
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:59:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By ANGST:
www.cornbread.com/~angst/gunroom.jpg

Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.



Is this sturdy enough for you?

Doesnt look like you have a vise on there, but do you do any prying on the table?



It's very sturdy and attached to the wall with "L" brackets. The thing does not move.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:00:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcovercash:

Originally Posted By vsound:
I built mine out of a solid core door blank from Lowe's (as the top) with 6x6 legs. I also have 2x6s around the top just under the door blank to provide a little more rigidity. Pretty simple setup. I don't have any pictures, but it's not really that complicated to figure out. The legs are lag-bolted to the top (countersunk) with 4 lag bolts per leg. The 2x6s are just screwed together and then screwed to the top and to the legs with regulare wood screws. I then poly urethaned the whole thing to fill in the holes and provide a smooth surface.

I have my loader mounted on it, and a vice. It's not even attached to the wall, and it does not move when I work on it.




Does the poly hold up to chemicals like, breakfree powderblast, and clp etc...?



I haven't encountered any problems with anything I've spilled on it yet. I do usually put a towel down when I'm using cleaning solutions, etc., but that hasn't stopped it from getting at least some amount of chemicals on it.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:01:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FALARAK:
Lowes. $150.
chrysler.websitewelcome.com/~user1010/pics/guns/reloading/bench_top.JPG

I used the MDF that came with it.... and put a combi stain and poly, and it REALLY makes a difference on how long the top will last, shed oil/water/grease, etc. Cleanup is a snap, and it looks so much better as well.



NICE looking top. I like the ready made ones, just looking for a weekend project to build though. I like to make stuff so I figure this is something good to do.

How does the poly hold up to the cleaning chemicals?

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:01:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FALARAK:

Originally Posted By ANGST:
www.cornbread.com/~angst/gunroom.jpg

Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.



Your workbench is on the space shuttle???




Yeah, I'm a door gunner, but I don't like to talk about it.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:04:43 AM EDT
I have a sears bought one mounted right next to my deep sink. Great for cleaning weapons and paint stuff.

It didn't come with a top, I have a piece of 3/4" ply for a top that I gave 4 coats of oil high gloss white paint on, I put some left over 1/2 round trim on the edges.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:07:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:11:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Q3131A:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=9&t=442051



NICE. I thinking thats gonna be a problem, is im gonna build this, get a realoader in a month or so, and then say to myself, i need another bench for my reloading stuff, then I will have two side by side LOL!
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:16:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcovercash:
NICE. I thinking thats gonna be a problem, is im gonna build this, get a realoader in a month or so, and then say to myself, i need another bench for my reloading stuff, then I will have two side by side LOL!



That can be a good thing - to isolate your two tables - if you are charging/weighing on one bench, and seating on another.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:17:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jcovercash:
How does the poly hold up to the cleaning chemicals?
Josh



Impervious.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:19:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FALARAK:

Originally Posted By jcovercash:
How does the poly hold up to the cleaning chemicals?
Josh



Impervious.



Cool. Have you ever used breakfree powderblast on it? I know its not good to get one wood stocks on guns, so i was wondering how this did.

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:23:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 6:35:07 AM EDT by NewbHunter]
I came across some CAD drawings I whipped up when I was thinking about how I would make my bench. I hope this gives you some good ideas. Sorry, there aren't any dimensions in the pictures, but you'd probably have to modify it from my dimensions anyway. Not just for length and depth, but I've heard that the best height on a workbench is to make it such that the bench surface is at your belt buckle. All pieces, except the work surfaces were made out of 2x4's and were screwed and glued together.

Anyway, here you go:

First I built four legs like this -



Then I built four cross pieces that looked like this -



Then I combined two legs and two cross pieces to make the front and back sections like this -



Then cut eight 2x4's to the appropriate length for the depth that you want on your workbench and connect them to the front and back sections like this -





Once all eight 2x4's were screwed and glued in I added the diagonal supports and it looked like this -



Then I added one layer of 3/4" MDF to the bottom shelf (I had to cut a notch out of it to fit around the diagonal support there) and two layers of 3/4" MDF to the top.


ETA: That workbench leg kit looks pretty cool! That would have saved me a lot of time! These took me about a day to make (I made 2), even with a miter saw! Although they are absolutely rock solid and I'm happy with how they turned out.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:25:04 AM EDT
Check out GRIZZLY.COM. They have workbench tops and leg sets that are the best I have found. I bought a 6 ft and 8 ft top and couldn't be happier with the results.

Grizzly workbench
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:42:23 AM EDT
There are some really good ideas here...I'll try to post a pic of mine.
It's basically 2X4 framed with 3/4" plywood top and lower shelf, 1/2" plywood sides and doors.

The 3/4" ply is doubled at the front to support the presses, which it does quite well.

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:52:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PBIR:
If you can get ahold of an old door or two they make great counters for the bench.



Ditto. I picked up an old SOLID wood door at a recycled lumber yard, finished it with linseed oil, and based it on 2 X 6's with 4 X 4 legs.

One consideration: figure out what height works best for you & your uses, maybe try a few times laying the top on stacks of whatever, making adjustments. I personally prefer it higher than some do. Lets me sit on a high stool with my legs underneath; also think about leaving an overhang in front to allow C-clamps, etc.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:09:56 AM EDT
If you want to add strength and stability, consider using a top with a sacrificial top (Masonite like OP suggested, or an old solid door, or a thick sheet of Maple plywood) with a laminated substrate of 2x4s and box framing the substrate with 2x8 or 2x10s, then dropping 4x4 or angled 2x4 legs braced off the ground with 2x4s for stability and to support a lower shelf for storage.

This way is a little labor intensive as you have to plane the substrate flat, but you end up with a very solid bench.

If you are building from a kit or from plans, remember to select each piece of lumber carefully. Crooked and knotted lumber will cost you time and frustration when you are trying to build square, if not another trip to the store.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:12:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By scrum:
If you want to add strength and stability, consider using a top with a sacrificial top (Masonite like OP suggested, or an old solid door, or a thick sheet of Maple plywood) with a laminated substrate of 2x4s and box framing the substrate with 2x8 or 2x10s, then dropping 4x4 or angled 2x4 legs braced off the ground with 2x4s for stability and to support a lower shelf for storage.

This way is a little labor intensive as you have to plane the substrate flat, but you end up with a very solid bench.

If you are building from a kit or from plans, remember to select each piece of lumber carefully. Crooked and knotted lumber will cost you time and frustration when you are trying to build square, if not another trip to the store.



Yea im picking with the wood I buy from lowes, i inspect every peice to get the best part for my money.

Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:33:46 AM EDT
I don't have pics handy, but my favorite workbench design is two 4 X 8 sheets of 3/4" plywood for the top, 2 x 6's for the top rails and six 4 x 4's for the legs. I cut the plywood down to about 30" wide and 6' to 8' feet long (depends on what size your space is). Two legs on each end and two centered in the middle. I notch out the tops of the 4 x 4's so the 2" x 6" rail frame fits in perfectly flush on it's side and connect the rails to the 4 x 4's with 1/4" x 2.5 inch lag bolts and washers. I drill pilot holes for the lag bolts and use a spade or forstner bit to countersink about 3/8 of an inch so the lag bolt head and washer are not sticking out. About 10 inches from the floor I also notch the 4 x 4's there to put in a smaller 2 x 4 rail system and use those to either put a shelf or as a support for a custom built cabinet with drawers, shelves, etc.

If you really want to get fancy and do some "showy bitch" stuff you can do a half inch wide rabbit along the top inside frame of the 2 x 6 rail system about 1.5 inches deep and "drop" the two sheets of 3/4-inch ply into the rabbit and secure. Visually it looks better but doesn't provide any extra strength. You can also make the rabbit 1.75 inches deep and put a 1/4-inch sheet of hardboard on top of the plywood as a sort of "sacrificial" top and replace it when ever it gets trashed.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:40:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ANGST:
www.cornbread.com/~angst/gunroom.jpg

Mine is just 2x6 and 2x4 screwed together with a plywood top to cover the cracks on top and make a backsplash.



Nice! I like the tin foil protection you put in the work space. Helps keep out those CIA mind control waves.

J/K

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 8:13:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 8:21:48 AM EDT by ORinTX]


I put old carpet down where I work on my guns so I don't scratch 'em up.

ETA: Coming soon -- A dillon. Or two.

My vice isn't in this pic. The total workbench is 4 "sections" wide, a total of two stud-lengths.

It's anchored to studs in the wall, so it ain't going anywhere.

There's a switch on the far end that controls the juice for the overhead lights and the electrical outlets. The switch is fed by some romex with a grounded plug on the end, which plugs into a GFI outlet in the garage.

Nothin' but plywood and 2x4s. And some 2x12s for the shelves up top.

It took a few evenings to build, but was well worth it.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 8:27:21 AM EDT
My current bench I built. 4x4 legs, with a solid 2x4 top (all 2x4's laid flat next to each other and screwed down) and then a 1/2" piece of plywood on top of that. It has a shelf underneath built without all the 2x4's for storage. I wanted it to be heavy, sturdy, but yet movable if absolutely needed.

This summer I hope to build a second bench the same way, however I'm going to put countertop on top of it, since the plywood tends to absorb to much of the oils.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 8:38:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NewbHunter:
I came across some CAD drawings I whipped up when I was thinking about how I would make my bench. I hope this gives you some good ideas. Sorry, there aren't any dimensions in the pictures, but you'd probably have to modify it from my dimensions anyway. Not just for length and depth, but I've heard that the best height on a workbench is to make it such that the bench surface is at your belt buckle. All pieces, except the work surfaces were made out of 2x4's and were screwed and glued together.

Anyway, here you go:

First I built four legs like this -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/Leg.jpg

Then I built four cross pieces that looked like this -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/CrossPiece.jpg

Then I combined two legs and two cross pieces to make the front and back sections like this -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/EndPiece.jpg

Then cut eight 2x4's to the appropriate length for the depth that you want on your workbench and connect them to the front and back sections like this -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/Connect.jpg

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/Connected.jpg

Once all eight 2x4's were screwed and glued in I added the diagonal supports and it looked like this -

img.photobucket.com/albums/v242/samjham/Diagonal.jpg

Then I added one layer of 3/4" MDF to the bottom shelf (I had to cut a notch out of it to fit around the diagonal support there) and two layers of 3/4" MDF to the top.


ETA: That workbench leg kit looks pretty cool! That would have saved me a lot of time! These took me about a day to make (I made 2), even with a miter saw! Although they are absolutely rock solid and I'm happy with how they turned out.



After looking this over, a couple times, I have decided to build one like this.

Thanks,
Josh
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 10:19:10 AM EDT
Here is mne. It is recycled kitchen cabinets from when we remodeled the kitchen.

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 10:34:41 AM EDT
My work room.

I have another room with my safes and two 6'x6'x3' locking cabinets for powder etc. and ammo.

The benches were made with savings in mind, designed to use materials with not alot of waste.
The tops are made of a really heavy sanded plywood. I can measure them when I get home.

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top