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Posted: 3/2/2006 4:29:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 9:16:47 AM EDT by Gopher]
They won't come out and say what this really was. Thank God he didn't make it inside the stadium.

OU bombing accidental, experts say
The Oklahoman ^ | March 1, 2006 | Jane Glenn Cannon


SOURCE


NORMAN - A Norman police bomb expert said Tuesday he does not believe University of Oklahoma student Joel Henry Hinrichs III committed suicide by blowing himself up outside a packed football stadium.

"I believe he accidentally blew himself up," Sgt. George Mauldin said.

Mauldin said Hinrichs, 21, an engineering student, had two to three pounds of triacetone triperoxide, commonly known as TATP, in a backpack in his lap when it exploded Oct. 1.

When asked if he believed Hinrichs meant to enter the stadium with the explosives, Mauldin replied, "I don't believe he intended for an explosion to occur at that spot (on the park bench)."

"Some of us will forever wonder what he (Hinrichs) was doing at that time, at that place," Police Chief Phil Cotten said.

Hinrichs was sitting on a park bench 173 yards from the OU stadium during the second quarter of OU's night game against Kansas State when the TATP inside his backpack detonated.

"Someone saw him fiddling with it (the backpack) shortly before the explosion occurred. I think he got cocky, and it went off," Mauldin said.

Mauldin and Cotten briefed Norman City Council members about the explosion and their agency's investigation in a conference before Tuesday night's council meeting.

The FBI has said in the past its investigation did not uncover any links between the student and terrorist organizations. They have said they may never know whether the student wanted to get inside the stadium.

The student's father, Joel Hinrichs Jr., has said his son intended to kill only himself.

Mauldin, head of the Norman bomb unit, said investigators detonated at the scene the remains of Hinrichs' backpack, which contained wires, a battery and a circuit board.

Graphic photos of Hinrichs' headless body still upright on the park bench next to a tattered backpack were shown to the council.

Mauldin said investigators found "quite a bit more" explosive material inside Hinrichs' Parkview apartment on Sooner Drive, southeast of Lindsey Street and Stinson Drive.

A pint-size Tupperware container on a counter was filled with TATP Hinrichs had manufactured, Mauldin said.

A pill bottle packed with TATP with a fuse stuck in it was found behind a computer, he said.

The FBI reported in November that 0.4 pound of TATP was found inside Hinrichs' apartment. TATP is the most unstable explosive known and is "the explosive of choice" in the Middle East, Mauldin said. "It is so volatile, even a small amount on the tip of a finger will explode if it comes within 8 inches of a match," Mauldin said.

Investigators also found a quantity of acetone and hydrogen, components necessary for manufacturing TATP, inside the student's apartment.

"We found evidence of him compressing TATP, which is foolhardy, given its properties," Mauldin said.

Making TATP is a seven-step process, Mauldin said, with the substance becoming explosive after three steps.

Bomb squad officers used great care in removing the material from Hinrichs' apartment for fear it would explode, Mauldin said.

"And we wanted to get it out of there quickly. The longer TATP sits, the more likely (it is) to explode spontaneously," he said.

Officers also removed "a lot" of military rounds, many of them live, and pieces of metal from the student's apartment, Mauldin said.

Metal fragments often are added to explosives to make them more deadly, he said.

The explosives Hinrichs had outside the stadium were pure, with no fragmentation added, Mauldin said.

However, he said, the student kept careful notes of experimentation with explosives in the weeks leading up to the Oct. 1 blast.

Notes indicated Hinrichs experimented with adding fragmentation to explosives as if "he were trying to make a damaging product," Mauldin said.

Most of Hinrichs' experiments occurred at Red Rock Canyon, according to the notes.

Didn't post the link because of having to register to read it.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 4:33:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/2/2006 4:34:46 AM EDT by speedracer422]
Other than the technical misinformation, it seems like they are just trying to draw conclusions. I didn't know that AP was the terrorist's choice though...


Speed


ETA: Oh, you mean the "live military catridges" thing? Liberal hype.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 4:51:33 AM EDT
The article doesn't say anything about his ROP roomate...or going to the mosque..or the ROP literature in his apartment...

PC will be the end of this country!
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 4:51:42 AM EDT
Riiiiiight...

How could a reasonable person conclude that he just wanted to kill himself?

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 4:55:36 AM EDT
... See!!!

... Remember all those paranoid wackos on this site claiming it was a huge, 5th column conspiracy to bring down the US?

... "Excuse me sir, but your tin-foil has a hole in it"


Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:01:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 5:01:52 AM EDT
Where to begin:


Originally Posted By Gopher:
Mauldin said Hinrichs, 21, an engineering student, had two to three pounds of triacetone triperoxide, commonly known as TATP, in a backpack in his lap when it exploded Oct. 1.



Organic peroxides are extremely unstable. In organic chem class we did everything we could to avoid producing them.



Originally Posted By Gopher:
Investigators also found a quantity of acetone and hydrogen, components necessary for manufacturing TATP, inside the student's apartment.



They mean hydrogen peroxide.


Originally Posted By Gopher:
The FBI reported in November that 0.4 pound of TATP was found inside Hinrichs' apartment. TATP is the most unstable explosive known and is "the explosive of choice" in the Middle East, Mauldin said. "It is so volatile, even a small amount on the tip of a finger will explode if it comes within 8 inches of a match," Mauldin said.





Link Posted: 3/2/2006 8:40:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Gopher:
They won't come out and say what this really was. Thank God he didn't make it inside the stadium.

OU bombing accidental, experts say
The Oklahoman ^ | March 1, 2006 | Jane Glenn Cannon


SOURCE


NORMAN - A Norman police bomb expert said Tuesday he does not believe University of Oklahoma student Joel Henry Hinrichs III committed suicide by blowing himself up outside a packed football stadium.

.....


Mauldin, head of the Norman bomb unit, said investigators detonated at the scene the remains of Hinrichs' backpack, which contained wires, a battery and a circuit board.

Graphic photos of Hinrichs' headless body still upright on the park bench next to a tattered backpack were shown to the council.

Mauldin said investigators found "quite a bit more" explosive material inside Hinrichs' Parkview apartment on Sooner Drive, southeast of Lindsey Street and Stinson Drive.

......

quote]

Ok, I'll be the first to say it:

THIS THREAD IS WORTHLESS WITHOUT PICS!!!!

Merlin
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 12:37:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By C-4:

The FBI reported in November that 0.4 pound of TATP was found inside Hinrichs' apartment. TATP is the most unstable explosive known and is "the explosive of choice" in the Middle East, Mauldin said. "It is so volatile, even a small amount on the tip of a finger will explode if it comes within 8 inches of a match," Mauldin said.





As opposed to ammonium triiodide??
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:00:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 71-Hour_Achmed:

Originally Posted By C-4:

The FBI reported in November that 0.4 pound of TATP was found inside Hinrichs' apartment. TATP is the most unstable explosive known and is "the explosive of choice" in the Middle East, Mauldin said. "It is so volatile, even a small amount on the tip of a finger will explode if it comes within 8 inches of a match," Mauldin said.





As opposed to ammonium triiodide??



Organic peroxides are inherantly unstable and can detonate from very little provocation. I highly doubt that terrorists in the Middle East are resorting to TATP as their "explosive of choice" when they can easily smuggle in compound detonators. Handling TATP is akin to doing jumping jacks while holding a loaded gun to your head with your finger on the trigger.

Ammonium tri-iodide, or more appropriately, nitrogen tri-iodide (NI3) is exquisitely sensitive to the slightest movement; even the slightest air movement will set it off. I've heard stories () of people placing a small amount (25mg) on a piece of banana and watch a fly try to land, only to see it killed by the mini-explosion.

The problem with NI3 is that it is so sensitive that once it dries out enough, even the weight of the crystals on the top of the little pile is enough to cause it to detonate. It has never been used by any military or by any terrorist. It is fun as a 'parlour trick' but nothing more.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 6:53:19 PM EDT
I'm sure he was a good kid that just made some bad decisions, he would NEVER have hurt anyone else[/friggin moron]
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:21:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By 71-Hour_Achmed:

Originally Posted By C-4:

The FBI reported in November that 0.4 pound of TATP was found inside Hinrichs' apartment. TATP is the most unstable explosive known and is "the explosive of choice" in the Middle East, Mauldin said. "It is so volatile, even a small amount on the tip of a finger will explode if it comes within 8 inches of a match," Mauldin said.





As opposed to ammonium triiodide??



Organic peroxides are inherantly unstable and can detonate from very little provocation. I highly doubt that terrorists in the Middle East are resorting to TATP as their "explosive of choice" when they can easily smuggle in compound detonators. Handling TATP is akin to doing jumping jacks while holding a loaded gun to your head with your finger on the trigger.

Ammonium tri-iodide, or more appropriately, nitrogen tri-iodide (NI3) is exquisitely sensitive to the slightest movement; even the slightest air movement will set it off. I've heard stories () of people placing a small amount (25mg) on a piece of banana and watch a fly try to land, only to see it killed by the mini-explosion.

The problem with NI3 is that it is so sensitive that once it dries out enough, even the weight of the crystals on the top of the little pile is enough to cause it to detonate. It has never been used by any military or by any terrorist. It is fun as a 'parlour trick' but nothing more.



The terrorists have been producing TATP in the West bank and Gaza for years. I was first briefed on it in 1991 or 1992 by the Israelis and it was old news then. Lots of bombers got killed making it, but it could be made easily (albeit very dangerously) with relatively common ingredients.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:31:20 PM EDT
Can anyone tell me how the Norman Police found out that he had dandruff?
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:37:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Another_Dude:
Can anyone tell me how the Norman Police found out that he had dandruff?



They found his "Head and Shoulders" in the bushes...I can't believe you dredged up that old assed joke!!
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:39:41 PM EDT

They found his "Head and Shoulders" in the bushes...I can't believe you dredged up that old assed joke!!



Really? If you knew me you would know that joke wasn't wasn't out of line.
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