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Posted: 2/27/2006 2:50:37 PM EDT
Anyone ever re-seeded or re-sodded their lawns with this grass? Is it more wear resistant than Bermuda grass? Any knowledgable advice appreciated.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:53:55 PM EDT
My dad plugged his lawn with it 25 years ago and it is like carpet now. Though in the summer it doesn't seem to do well (the blades curl like corn from the lack of water) The yard is rather rocky and it drains well which is why it doesn't seem to get enough water in the summer. All in all when it is doing well it is great and the envy of the neighborhood.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:55:06 PM EDT
tag


I want to check that stuff out when I finally buy a house.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:57:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 3:01:12 PM EDT by callgood]
Don't fall for the deal that it grows in shade. It doesn't. I have a pin oak in my back yard that has grown over the years, pushing my zoisia back a little each summer. Lime/fertilize/water it and it's tough stuff. We had it in Mobile growing up and we played football on it. (barefoot) It got little or no care, other than cutting.

ETA- depending on what part of Texas you're in, you may need to LOWER the soil ph. If you have the kleechee (sp) soil you'll have to add peat or something and till it pretty good so the roots can get established. We planted it in red clay (plugged) and once it took over it grew almost year round (semi tropical).
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:58:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
tag


I want to check that stuff out when I finally buy a house.




Red,
I did some research on Zoysia grass and apparently it doesn't grow worth a damn here in Wisconsin. It is better suited to areas below the Mason-Dixon line.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:00:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dalesimpson:

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
tag


I want to check that stuff out when I finally buy a house.




Red,
I did some research on Zoysia grass and apparently it doesn't grow worth a damn here in Wisconsin. It is better suited to areas below the Mason-Dixon line.

Hard winters will usually kill it pretty bad. Virginia is about as far north as it will grow. Even some golf courses in Maryland have a hard time keeping it alive during the winter.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:01:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By dalesimpson:

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
tag


I want to check that stuff out when I finally buy a house.




Red,
I did some research on Zoysia grass and apparently it doesn't grow worth a damn here in Wisconsin. It is better suited to areas below the Mason-Dixon line.

Hard winters will usually kill it pretty bad. Virginia is about as far north as it will grow. Even some golf courses in Maryland have a hard time keeping it alive during the winter.



Dang ... scratch that then, as I don't plan on buying a house until I can move back to north dakota, or to minnesota.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:05:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
My dad plugged his lawn with it 25 years ago and it is like carpet now. Though in the summer it doesn't seem to do well (the blades curl like corn from the lack of water) The yard is rather rocky and it drains well which is why it doesn't seem to get enough water in the summer. All in all when it is doing well it is great and the envy of the neighborhood.




That's what I'm looking for. My bermuda does ok, but I want something a little tougher. I'm putting in a sprink system next month any for my current lawn, but it stays straggly during the AUG months. I'm wanting that carpet like quality.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:11:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By soowah:

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
My dad plugged his lawn with it 25 years ago and it is like carpet now. Though in the summer it doesn't seem to do well (the blades curl like corn from the lack of water) The yard is rather rocky and it drains well which is why it doesn't seem to get enough water in the summer. All in all when it is doing well it is great and the envy of the neighborhood.




That's what I'm looking for. My bermuda does ok, but I want something a little tougher. I'm putting in a sprink system next month any for my current lawn, but it stays straggly during the AUG months. I'm wanting that carpet like quality.

What is your soil like? If there is a lot of corse material just below the surface you are going to have a hard time with any grass in August though if it holds moisture well then the zoysia should do ok.

CHARACTERISTICS:
Warm-season grass - leaf texture from fine to medium coarse - color ranges from light to medium green - forms a dense, low maintenance lawn - spreads by stolons and rhizomes - shoot growth rate is slow. Easy to maintain.

RECOMMENDED USAGE:
Hot, humid and tropical climates - can withstand very heavy usage - recommended for residential and commercial lawn sites.

TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE:
Tolerates heat exceptionally well up to 100(F, - subject to winter dormancy as it turns tan to brown at temperatures below 55(F, Zoysia japonica has fair cold hardiness, the best of the zoysias, but still ranks lower than cool-season turfgrasses.

DROUGHT RESISTANCE:
Moderate to good - remains green and resists short periods of drought - takes heat as well or better than any other grass. Can go into summer dormancy when irrigation is withheld; upon return of moisture supply, will green up again. Some varieties have better tolerance to heat and drought.

SHADE ADAPTATION:
Good - slow growing in partial shade, but much better than some warm-season grasses.

WEAR RESISTANCE:
Superior - exceptionally hardy, has the best wear resistance of any grass - tolerates heavy traffic - but slow to recover from severe thinning.

There is another grass that might suit you well. I can't remember the name but it is from South Africa and used in a number of golf courses in California. I think one of those courses is Riviera but I can't be sure. Anyway this grass will grow well in sandy soil in dry warm climates.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:16:21 PM EDT
No I've got good soil. About 3-10ft of good rich black earth soil. There is one place I've got that is about 3' square and only about 5" of soil then it turns to caliche. I have given up on that spot and going to build a planter or a stone fountain.

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