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Posted: 2/27/2006 12:25:18 PM EDT
How do I go about doing it?

Thanks

TXL
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:25:49 PM EDT
Yes.

Put shit in it, and put it in the oven.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:27:43 PM EDT
1. Wash skillet in hot, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and dry completely.
2. Apply a thin coating of melted shortening (Crisco, for example) or vegetable oil with a solf cloth or paper towel.
3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place skillet UPSIDE DOWN on top oven rack.
4. Place foil on a cookie sheet and place on bottom rack of oven. This will catch the drippings from the skillet.
5. Bake in oven for one hour.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:27:56 PM EDT
Yes, you can.

Wipe it with lard or cooking oil, heat oven to 350. Cast iron in oven for approximately one hour. Repeat as necessary.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:28:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chokey:
1. Wash skillet in hot, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and dry completely.
2. Apply a thin coating of melted shortening (Crisco, for example) or vegetable oil with a solf cloth or paper towel.
3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place skillet UPSIDE DOWN on top oven rack.
4. Place foil on a cookie sheet and place on bottom rack of oven. This will catch the drippings from the skillet.
5. Bake in oven for one hour.



what he said- light on the soap
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:29:22 PM EDT
I've found the best way to prepare a pan for seasoning is to stick it in a fire, get the sucker really hot then wash it off.

Repeat Chokey's seasoning method two or three times for a great coating (sans soap - once you have seasoning on it, NEVER, EVER use soap!)
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:30:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cleatus:

Originally Posted By Chokey:
1. Wash skillet in hot, soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and dry completely.
2. Apply a thin coating of melted shortening (Crisco, for example) or vegetable oil with a solf cloth or paper towel.
3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place skillet UPSIDE DOWN on top oven rack.
4. Place foil on a cookie sheet and place on bottom rack of oven. This will catch the drippings from the skillet.
5. Bake in oven for one hour.



what he said- light on the soap



And throw in a pinch of gasoline......



J/K

Yeah.

That's mostly the same proceedure I use for my new grills.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:35:38 PM EDT
thanks all


txl
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:42:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 12:44:26 PM EDT by callgood]
DANGER, WARNING, HOLD THE PHONE, JACKSON!

Yes, you can season your skillet. Peanut oil is best, it will withstand high heat without smoking. Two weeks ago I asked this same question here even as I was seasoning one in the oven.

Wife was out of town. Ah HA. Best time to proceed. I used Canola oil and started at 350 and slowly stepped it up to 410 in 10 degree increments. In the oven for 2-3 hours and no smoke. It seasoned beautifully, BUT...........

When the wife returned she said, "It smells like a KFC in here. I thought you were going to do your diet while I was gone!" I told her what I had done and for the next 3 days she complained of the odor.

If you have an outdoor propane fish cooker, use it on the patio to season your skillet. Or go to KFC and leave the carton laying around.

ETA: if you're single, disregard the above.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:49:38 PM EDT
NO SOAP ON CAST IRON, NEVER!!!

You'll never get it out, in other words, you'll ruin it.
Unless, you like soapy seasoning on your food?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:50:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gonzo_beyondo:
NO SOAP ON CAST IRON, NEVER!!!

You'll never get it out, in other words, you'll ruin it.
Unless, you like soapy seasoning on your food?



wash it when you first get it, then never wash it again.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:54:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:56:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 12:58:03 PM EDT by TxLewis]

Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:

Originally Posted By Chokey:

Originally Posted By gonzo_beyondo:
NO SOAP ON CAST IRON, NEVER!!!

You'll never get it out, in other words, you'll ruin it.
Unless, you like soapy seasoning on your food?



wash it when you first get it, then never wash it again.



Bulshit.

Pure Bullshit.

Since my divorce (two years ago?) I have used cast iron for all my cooking. I can, and will, use soap on them at anytime. Hell, I even put mine in the dishwasher.

I heat up water in the skillet, apply some soame and even SCRUB the skillet with the hot/soapy water.

If I am concerned about the 'seasoning' I rinse thoroughly and place the sillet bck on the warm burner. Once the water evaporates, I put in a dab of bacon grease, wipe witha paer towel and reuse for the next meal.

Hell, I even put mine in the dishwasher.

TRG





Fat lot of good that does, ask him about the erosion method of dish cleaning.

TXL
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:01:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:03:28 PM EDT
ya dumb fuck, it don't work when you have the original in your sigline below
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:03:59 PM EDT
THis no-soap stuff is pure horsepucky.

You can wash a cast iron pan with soap and water, it will not hurt the pan. It may thin the seasoning coating a bit, but using the pan will replenish it.

I don't always use soap and water though, mostly I use plain hot water and a brush. The water should be as hot as you can make it to cut the grease and dissolve cooked on food. It'll also kill most of the cooties if you can get the temp up towards boiling. The water from my kitchen sink comes out at 170 degrees, so it's real close to boiling already.

One of the big problems with not washing your cast iron out from time to time is that burnt in food particles can go rancid for one, and they can also begin to harbor other bits of nastiness. They can also impart an odor or flvor to other foods.

Sometimes a cast iron pan will get somethign stubborn on it and you must resort to abrasives to get rid of it. No problem. Even if you polish down to bare iron, turn on a stove burner and coat with the oil of your choice...I use butter as often as not. cook that stuff down at medium heat for a while. Recoat, lather, rinse and repeat as the saying goes. Then use the bastard. It'll reseason the spot in a matter od days of regular use. I reseasoned two pans this way this past weekend.

You can also buy Lodge cast iron pans pre-seasoned from the factory. Walmart sells them that way as well as other outlets.

My wife and I typically give a cast iron fry pan and lingerie as a wedding shower gift to new brides...kind of a punishment and rewards thing.

We have a wide selection of pans available to us including some expensive AllClad stuff. I'm moving more and more to the cast iron. Once seasoned it is anti-stick, even heating, easy to clean and just generally superior to all other options. Go easy on the cleaning, but a bit of soap and scrubbing from time-to-time won't hurt them.

The advise to flip the pans over in the over is pure gold. Most modern oils tend to pool and gum up rather than cook down and coat the pan. giving the excess somewhere to go is a good idea.
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