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Posted: 2/27/2006 11:28:50 AM EDT
I know a lot of people don't know that the Coast Guard is part of the Military. I know I didn't until about 5 years ago (and they're pretty touchy about this... I remember when I was shilling for the Army/Navy/Air Force/Marine Corps Times, I was hung up on after being told "sorry, but you forgot the Coast Guard" about 20 times. Even though the Navy Times serves the CG, like it used to serve the Marine Corps until the MCTimes split off in 1998). But I recently talked to somebody who's part of the US Public Health Service who says that's a branch of the Military. I figured they'd know what they're talking about, so I believed them, but I was surprised.

So, how many are there? I know for a fact there's (in alphabetical order so I don't start inter-force rivalries up in this thread) the Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, Navy, and I believe (but I'm not entirely certain) the Public Health Service. Any others I'm missing?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:30:05 AM EDT
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:31:33 AM EDT
2

Infantry and everyone who works for Infantry.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:31:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



I don't know if this applies right now, but doesn't the Coast Guard technically become a part of the Navy in times of war?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:34:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



+1 and it was under the Treasury Deptartment before that IIRC.

CG is a good & valuable service, but it's priority is not to "kill people and break things" as is the primary mission of the US Military (Army, Navy, USMC, Air Force).
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:35:55 AM EDT
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:36:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:37:13 AM EDT by gardenWeasel]
The internet says:

Five of your choices are .mil and one is .gov.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:36:32 AM EDT
87 branches!

Research has proven this!
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:36:45 AM EDT
TWO: The Air Force, and the guys who go to war AFTER the Air Force
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:39:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Sorry, wrong answer.
Marines are part of the Department of the Navy, as is the United States Navy.
They are both seperate branches of the U.S. military.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:41:10 AM EDT
Wiki has a pretty decent listing of all the agencies that report to the DoD (i.e. NRO, NGA, MDA, etc)
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:41:55 AM EDT
Curiosity tag...
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:46:05 AM EDT
There are 6.

Few know about the 6th.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:46:50 AM EDT
I've been on Wikipedia trying to get an answer to this, and I found a quote from former Surgeon General Jocelyn Elders...

"We must stop this love affair with the fetus..."

Dis-gus-ting.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:47:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Waldo0506:
There are 6.

Few know about the 6th.



All of us SSDGs knew we were DoD.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:48:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By paramarine326:

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Sorry, wrong answer.
Marines are part of the Department of the Navy, as is the United States Navy.
They are both seperate branches of the U.S. military.


Ding!!
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:54:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:54:55 AM EDT by MagKnightX]

Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:

Originally Posted By Waldo0506:
There are 6.

Few know about the 6th.



All of us SSDGs knew we were DoD.



Ship Service Diesel Generators?

ETA: NM, I got it, Space Shuttle Door Gunner.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:55:20 AM EDT
SSDG: Same Shit, Different Goon?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:02:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 12:16:03 PM EDT by gardenWeasel]
7 Uniformed Services of the U.S.:

United States Navy
United States Marine Corps
United States Army
United States Air Force
United States Coast Guard
Public Health Service
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

5 of which are armed forces:

United States Navy
United States Marine Corps
United States Army
United States Air Force
United States Coast Guard




Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:35:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 12:36:18 PM EDT by AcidGambit]
Wroooonnnngggggg

The Coast Guard is part of the Department of Homeland Security. That is why there is no JCS from the Coast Guard. It times of war, conflict, or need to be deployed overseas, the USCG is under the control of the U.S. Navy.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:40:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By paramarine326:

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Sorry, wrong answer.
Marines are part of the Department of the Navy, as is the United States Navy.
They are both seperate branches of the U.S. military.



Same department, same service. While you maybe the men's department, you're still part of the Navy.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:45:33 PM EDT
Don't forget the Merchant Marines.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 1:58:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 1:59:45 PM EDT by Zaphod]

Originally Posted By paramarine326:

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Sorry, wrong answer.
Marines are part of the Department of the Navy, as is the United States Navy.
They are both seperate branches of the U.S. military.




Nice contradiction.

There are three branches of the DOD. If you want to count the Marines, then you have to count the USCG, which has already been identified as being in the DHS.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:03:19 PM EDT
Look at it this way:

Administratively:

DOD: Army, Navy, Air Force
DHS: USCG


Operationally:

Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, USCG



I don't know where the USMM fits in, but they do. They took it in the shorts something fierce during our wars, and deserve to be counted among the Armed Forces, especially since they help keep the USN's support ships going.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:04:42 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:11:17 PM EDT
I am an E-5 in the Coast Guard, went through MEPS with the other ones, had all my medical and dental done at navy and air force installations over the years and I am subject to the UCMJ. You mean they have been lying to me all this time about being part of the military
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:12:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sylvan:
So the Army is seperate from the Department of the Army?
Wow, thats confusing.





Huh?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:14:11 PM EDT
take lessons in counting from Monty Python did we?

1,2, 5......
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:19:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Strictly speaking, you are correct.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:19:54 PM EDT
I would like to know where teh Merchant Marine falls into the whole military equation. There is even a Merchant Marine Academy.


Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:20:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 2:25:04 PM EDT by kozmic]
Hey... Where's the option that includes the BATFE? (flamesuit on)
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:07:44 PM EDT
Six. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, and Chuck Norris.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:15:22 PM EDT
The Puddle Pirates (USCG) were the 9th largest Navy in the world at one time.

<­BR>Semper Fi
DOC
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 7:48:42 PM EDT
Right now two, The Air Force, and the guys on the ground picking up the shattered fragments....

Within a decade or two after SpaceCom (StratCom) breaks off it'll still be two, just the AF will have lsot it's altitude advantage
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 8:53:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:
I am an E-5 in the Coast Guard, went through MEPS with the other ones, had all my medical and dental done at navy and air force installations over the years and I am subject to the UCMJ. You mean they have been lying to me all this time about being part of the military


In my mind, that's the dichotomy that decides whether one is military or not.

Then again, just being subject to the UCMJ may or may not make you a "separate branch," if you catch my drift. IOW, if you're subject to the UCMJ, then you still must answer the question of *how* you are subject to the UCMJ.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:01:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:07:50 PM EDT
There are three types of Congressional Medals of Honor. One for the Air Force, one for the Navy, and one for the Army. Likewise there is the Navy Cross, the Air Force Cross, and the Army Cross. Find a Coast Guard cross and you can add them, same for the Marine Corps (they get the Navy Cross, of course). Three, count em, three branches.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:16:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lordtrader:

Originally Posted By Zaphod:
Strictly speaking, three.

Army, Navy, Air Force.

The Marines are part of the Navy, whether they like to admit it or not.



Well there you go. Paycheck they get say Dept. of the Navy on it.

The Department of the Navy is run by the Secretary of the Navy.

The Department of the Navy wording on the Marine Corps seal does NOT mean that the Marine Corps is a department of the Navy, it means that the Marine Corps falls under the Department of the Navy.

The fucking Chairman of the Joint Cheifs of Staff is a Marine. How the fuck do you explain that one? Lunatics running the asylum? If the Marine Corps were part of the Navy, the Commandant of the Marine Corps would be a subordinate to the Cheif of Naval Operations. He wouldn't be sitting next to him on the JCS. And the CNO's boss certainly would not be a Marine.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:24:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tyman:
2
Infantry and everyone who works for Infantry.

Probably the best answer. With the exception of Nuclear Weapons, every piece of military personnel & hardware is designed to ultimately support a guy on the ground with a rifle in his hand.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:15:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 10:28:58 PM EDT by LANCEMAN]

Originally Posted By Chairborne:
There are three types of Congressional Medals of Honor. One for the Air Force, one for the Navy, and one for the Army. Likewise there is the Navy Cross, the Air Force Cross, and the Army Cross. Find a Coast Guard cross and you can add them, same for the Marine Corps (they get the Navy Cross, of course). Three, count em, three branches.

www.cmohs.org/images/medal4_efficient.jpg



Coast Guard Signalman First Class Douglas Munro won a Medal of Honor in WWII at Guadalcanal.
It was the Navy MOH.

ETA: To answer your question the USCG falls under the Navy MOH and Navy Cross as it's highest awards.


The Only Member Of The United States Coast Guard To Be Awarded The Nations Highest Military Honor - May God Rest His Soul

The Coast Guard's first major participation in the Pacific war was at Guadalcanal. Here the service played a large part in the landings on the islands. So critical was their task that they were later involved in every major amphibious campaign during World War II. During the war, the Coast Guard manned 351 Navy warships, 288 Army vessels, 802 cutters and hundreds more amphibious type assault craft. It was in these ships and craft that the Coast Guard fulfilled one of its most important but least glamorous roles during the war--that is getting the men to the beaches. The initial landings were made on Guadalcanal in August 1942, and this hard-fought campaign lasted for nearly six months. Seven weeks after the initial landings, during a small engagement near the Matanikau River, Signalman First Class Douglas Albert Munro, died while rescuing a group of marines near the Matanikau River.

DOUGLAS MUNRO'S MEDAL OF HONOR CITATION

Awarded posthumously to

DOUGLAS ALBERT MUNRO, SIGNALMAN FIRST CLASS, U.S. COAST GUARD

"For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty as Office-in-Charge of a group of Higgins boats, engaged in the evacuation of a Battalion of Marines trapped by enemy Japanese forces at Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on September 27, 1942. After making preliminary plans for the evacuation of nearly 500 beleaguered Marines, Munro, under constant risk of his life, daringly led five of his small craft toward the shore. As he closed the beach, he signalled [sic] the others to land, and then in order to draw the enemy's fire and protect the heavily loaded boats, he valiantly placed his craft with its two small guns as a shield between the beachhead and the Japanese. When the perilous task of evacuation was nearly completed, Munro was killed by enemy fire, but his crew, two of whom were wounded, carried on until the last boat had loaded and cleared the beach. By his outstanding leadership, expert planning, and dauntless devotion to duty, he and his courageous comrades undoubtedly saved the lives of many who otherwise would have perished. He gallantly gave up his life in defense of his country."

The Medal was presented to his Mother by Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States. Douglas is buried at the Laurel Hills Memorial Park in Cle Elum, Washington.


http://www.medalofhonor.com/DouglasMunro.htm
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:34:51 PM EDT
The US Public Health Service does carry a US uniformed services identification card, plus they have rank structures similar to the navy and marine corp, depending on what their job is. For example a surgeon or scientist that works with NOAA may wear naval rank, where as other members that are not seafaring will wear Marine rank. In any case they are all officers, there are no enlisted persons that I am aware of since I have never seen any of them. I see the officer sort everyday because I work at the CDC.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:13:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



+1 and it was under the Treasury Deptartment before that IIRC.

CG is a good & valuable service, but it's priority is not to "kill people and break things" as is the primary mission of the US Military (Army, Navy, USMC, Air Force).



The primary mission of the military is to fight and win the Nation's wars. Killing people and breakng things is simply a method. Quoting Rush Limbaugh as a military expert is laughable.

Regarding the rest of this thread - once again, we are arguing semantics. Until you can define "branch" this argument is ridiculous.

How many cabinet level department are there with armed forces? 2 - DoD and DHS.

How many subordinate departments within DoD? 3 - Army, Navy, AF

How many separate armed forces are there? 5 - Army, Navy, AF, USMC, CG.

Merchant Marines fall under the Navy as needed in wartime, and only then would they considered "military." For a group to be paert of the armed forces, it is pretty much a given they should be, well, ARMED. In addition, their mission profile should include OFFENSIVE use if those weapons. A requirement and expectation of the offensive use of force is what separates the role of the military from law enforcement / anyone else legally armed to defend themselves.

Most Merchant Marine Officers, IIRC, hold commissions in the US Navy Reserve, FWIW.

Public Health Service and such is not military. All military are uniformed services, but all uniformed services are not military (see my earlier comment about being armed).

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:20:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Adam_White:

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



+1 and it was under the Treasury Deptartment before that IIRC.

CG is a good & valuable service, but it's priority is not to "kill people and break things" as is the primary mission of the US Military (Army, Navy, USMC, Air Force).



The primary mission of the military is to fight and win the Nation's wars. Killing people and breakng things is simply a method. Quoting Rush Limbaugh as a military expert is laughable.

Regarding the rest of this thread - once again, we are arguing semantics. Until you can define "branch" this argument is ridiculous.

How many cabinet level department are there with armed forces? 2 - DoD and DHS.

How many subordinate departments within DoD? 3 - Army, Navy, AF

How many separate armed forces are there? 5 - Army, AF,Navy, USMC part of Dept of Navy at left <, CG. (does not fall under the three subordinate departments you listed above)

Merchant Marines fall under the Navy as needed in wartime, and only then would they considered "military." For a group to be paert of the armed forces, it is pretty much a given they should be, well, ARMED. In addition, their mission profile should include OFFENSIVE use if those weapons. A requirement and expectation of the offensive use of force is what separates the role of the military from law enforcement / anyone else legally armed to defend themselves.

Most Merchant Marine Officers, IIRC, hold commissions in the US Navy Reserve, FWIW.

Public Health Service and such is not military. All military are uniformed services, but all uniformed services are not military (see my earlier comment about being armed).




Good points, but being armed alone does not make you an "armed force". If it did the DEA, FBI, CIA, etc would all count. The distinction is carrying on offensive operations in support of the nation's defense. The Coast Guard does not do this, they are not part of the 3 DoD branches, they are not a US Military branch, period. They are a pseudo-navy, and they have an important mission (although defensive only) but they don't have a single weapon in their inventory with a strictly offensive purpose.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:34:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chairborne:

Originally Posted By Adam_White:

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



+1 and it was under the Treasury Deptartment before that IIRC.

CG is a good & valuable service, but it's priority is not to "kill people and break things" as is the primary mission of the US Military (Army, Navy, USMC, Air Force).



The primary mission of the military is to fight and win the Nation's wars. Killing people and breakng things is simply a method. Quoting Rush Limbaugh as a military expert is laughable.

Regarding the rest of this thread - once again, we are arguing semantics. Until you can define "branch" this argument is ridiculous.

How many cabinet level department are there with armed forces? 2 - DoD and DHS.

How many subordinate departments within DoD? 3 - Army, Navy, AF

How many separate armed forces are there? 5 - Army, AF,Navy, USMC part of Dept of Navy at left <, CG. (does not fall under the three subordinate departments you listed above)

Merchant Marines fall under the Navy as needed in wartime, and only then would they considered "military." For a group to be paert of the armed forces, it is pretty much a given they should be, well, ARMED. In addition, their mission profile should include OFFENSIVE use if those weapons. A requirement and expectation of the offensive use of force is what separates the role of the military from law enforcement / anyone else legally armed to defend themselves.

Most Merchant Marine Officers, IIRC, hold commissions in the US Navy Reserve, FWIW.

Public Health Service and such is not military. All military are uniformed services, but all uniformed services are not military (see my earlier comment about being armed).




Good points, but being armed alone does not make you an "armed force". If it did the DEA, FBI, CIA, etc would all count. The distinction is carrying on offensive operations in support of the nation's defense. The Coast Guard does not do this, they are not part of the 3 DoD branches, they are not a US Military branch, period. They are a pseudo-navy, and they have an important mission (although defensive only) but they don't have a single weapon in their inventory with a strictly offensive purpose.



Reading Comprehension is a dying art.


you: Good points, but being armed alone does not make you an "armed force". If it did the DEA, FBI, CIA, etc would all count. The distinction is carrying on offensive operations in support of the nation's defense.


Allow myself to quote... myself:


me: A requirement and expectation of the offensive use of force is what separates the role of the military from law enforcement / anyone else legally armed to defend themselves.


As for the coast guard - offensive ops may not be their bread and butter, but they are capable of it is need be, and have done so in the past. The first shots in the US Civil War fired against a confederate ship were from a Revenue Cutter vessel.

Ships operating in defensive roles can only fire against threats - in offensive operations, any ship belonging to an established enemy is fair game, whetehr it poses a threat or not. There is nothing I know of, doctrinally or legally , stopping Coast Guard ships OPCON to Navy commanders in wartime from making such engagements.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:37:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:39:56 PM EDT by LANCEMAN]

Originally Posted By Chairborne:

Originally Posted By Adam_White:

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By BTBOB:
Actually the coast guard in now in the department of homeland security, not the department of defense.



+1 and it was under the Treasury Deptartment before that IIRC.

CG is a good & valuable service, but it's priority is not to "kill people and break things" as is the primary mission of the US Military (Army, Navy, USMC, Air Force).



The primary mission of the military is to fight and win the Nation's wars. Killing people and breakng things is simply a method. Quoting Rush Limbaugh as a military expert is laughable.

Regarding the rest of this thread - once again, we are arguing semantics. Until you can define "branch" this argument is ridiculous.

How many cabinet level department are there with armed forces? 2 - DoD and DHS.

How many subordinate departments within DoD? 3 - Army, Navy, AF

How many separate armed forces are there? 5 - Army, AF,Navy, USMC part of Dept of Navy at left <, CG. (does not fall under the three subordinate departments you listed above)

Merchant Marines fall under the Navy as needed in wartime, and only then would they considered "military." For a group to be paert of the armed forces, it is pretty much a given they should be, well, ARMED. In addition, their mission profile should include OFFENSIVE use if those weapons. A requirement and expectation of the offensive use of force is what separates the role of the military from law enforcement / anyone else legally armed to defend themselves.

Most Merchant Marine Officers, IIRC, hold commissions in the US Navy Reserve, FWIW.

Public Health Service and such is not military. All military are uniformed services, but all uniformed services are not military (see my earlier comment about being armed).




Good points, but being armed alone does not make you an "armed force". If it did the DEA, FBI, CIA, etc would all count. The distinction is carrying on offensive operations in support of the nation's defense. The Coast Guard does not do this, they are not part of the 3 DoD branches, they are not a US Military branch, period. They are a pseudo-navy, and they have an important mission (although defensive only) but they don't have a single weapon in their inventory with a strictly offensive purpose.



So all those armed USCG guys and boats over in the Persian Gulf right now don't count huh Since you say they are a "pseudo-navy" I guess they are only kinda sorta there.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:44:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:
So all those armed USCG guys and boats over in the Persian Gulf right now don't count huh Since you say they are a "pseudo-navy" I guess they are only kinda sorta there.



"All those"? Whats that, 10 guys and a dinghy providing port security? j/k, I know the USCG has an important mission, and that a handful of them are in the gulf performing strictly defensive security patrols, but just being in the AOR does not make you a "combatant", the AAFES contractors are over there too. The USCG has nothing to be ashamed of, but they are NOT part of the DoD, and never have been, and they are no more "military" than the Border Patrol is.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 12:03:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Chairborne:

Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:
So all those armed USCG guys and boats over in the Persian Gulf right now don't count huh Since you say they are a "pseudo-navy" I guess they are only kinda sorta there.



"All those"? Whats that, 10 guys and a dinghy providing port security? j/k, I know the USCG has an important mission, and that a handful of them are in the gulf performing strictly defensive security patrols, but just being in the AOR does not make you a "combatant", the AAFES contractors are over there too. The USCG has nothing to be ashamed of, but they are NOT part of the DoD, and never have been, and they are no more "military" than the Border Patrol is.



Over the last few years it would be more like thousands of coasties, in port security units and as crews and support staff for many different ships and small patrol cutters. They are operating under the Navy's command so they are part of the DOD in these operations. You want to throw out the word "combatant", how many guys on the flightline at an air force base in the states are classified as "combatants" ? Doesn't really matter, they are in their place and doing their jobs, just like the USCG.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 12:23:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Napoleon_Tanerite:
SSDG: Same Shit, Different Goon?



Sorry....Someone ring?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 12:23:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:

Over the last few years it would be more like thousands of coasties, in port security units and as crews and support staff for many different ships and small patrol cutters. They are operating under the Navy's command so they are part of the DOD in these operations. You want to throw out the word "combatant", how many guys on the flightline at an air force base in the states are classified as "combatants" ? Doesn't really matter, they are in their place and doing their jobs, just like the USCG.



Normally I would just let this one fade away, but I've been drinking and I'm bored so I'll elaborate. You are correct that I, and my flightline bretheren serve in a support capacity, but we support the USAF warfighter (our pilots and aircrew) directly. The entire Army/USMC, as well support their warfighters, infantry, Armor, Artillery, etc. The USCG has no direct warfighters, so their support is for DoD service's warfighters. Yes, we are all much more "tail" than "tooth", but the USCG is all tail. I know I sound like an asshole, who is disparaging the USCG, but thats not the way I see it. The USCG serves a vital role in our nations defense, and just as importantly in the safety of the seas, but they have never been, and never will be, an offensive force.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 12:24:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Chairborne:

Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:
So all those armed USCG guys and boats over in the Persian Gulf right now don't count huh Since you say they are a "pseudo-navy" I guess they are only kinda sorta there.



"All those"? Whats that, 10 guys and a dinghy providing port security? j/k, I know the USCG has an important mission, and that a handful of them are in the gulf performing strictly defensive security patrols, but just being in the AOR does not make you a "combatant", the AAFES contractors are over there too. The USCG has nothing to be ashamed of, but they are NOT part of the DoD, and never have been, and they are no more "military" than the Border Patrol is.



MOST patrols in Iraq now are strictly defensive. Those Coast Guard crews in Iraq can and will fire upon the enemy if they receive intel or witness something to ID that enemy as such. This is NOTHING like the border patrol (or other law enforcement agencies), who can only use their weapons in defense of their lives or the loves of another.

IN addition, those "10 guys and a dinghy" likely have orders to employ deadly force in defense of that port. What strictly law enforcement agency can use deadly force unless in defense of a human life (maybe DOE, for nuke sites)?

Leave it to a Zoomie to feel a need to disparage the Coast Guard.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 12:30:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Chairborne:
... The USCG serves a vital role in our nations defense, and just as importantly in the safety of the seas, but they have never been, and never will be, an offensive force.



Again, reading comprehension is needed. I already stated a famous example of an offensive Coast Guard operation that predated even the name "Cosast Guard." There is NOTHING stopping a commander from using a Coast Guard crew in Iraq for an offensive op. To compare them to Aafes employees, who are not even allowed weapons or to even go outside the wire (we have to fly them everywhere), is just stupid.
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